14 Works

Data from: Population genetic dynamics of an invasion reconstructed from the sediment egg bank

Markus Möst, Sarah Oexle, Silvia Markova, Dalia Aidukaite, Livia Baumgartner, Hans-Bernd Stich, Martin Wessels, Dominik Martin-Creuzburg & Piet Spaak
Biological invasions are a global issue with far-reaching consequences for single species, communities and whole ecosystems. Our understanding of modes and mechanisms of biological invasions requires knowledge of the genetic processes associated with successful invasions. In many instances, this information is particularly difficult to obtain as the initial phases of the invasion process often pass unnoticed and we rely on inferences from contemporary population genetic data. Here, we combined historic information with the genetic analysis...

Data from: Co-evolutionary dynamics between public good producers and cheats in the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Rolf Kümmerli, Lorenzo A. Santorelli, Elisa Granato, Zoé Dumas, Akos Dobay, Ashleigh S. Griffin & Stuart A. West
The production of beneficial public goods is common in the microbial world, and so is cheating – the exploitation of public goods by non-producing mutants. Here, we examine co-evolutionary dynamics between cooperators and cheats and ask whether cooperators can evolve strategies to reduce the burden of exploitation, and whether cheats in turn can improve their exploitation abilities. We evolved cooperators of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, producing the shareable iron-scavenging siderophore pyoverdine, together with cheats, defective...

Data from: Hybrid ‘superswarm’ leads to rapid divergence and establishment of populations during a biological invasion

Denis Roy, Kay Lucek, Ryan P. Walter & Ole Seehausen
Understanding the genetic background of invading species can be crucial information clarifying why they become invasive. Intraspecific genetic admixture among lineages separated in the native ranges may promote the rate and extent of an invasion by substantially increasing standing genetic variation. Here, we examined the genetic relationships among threespine stickleback that recently colonized Switzerland. This invasion results from several distinct genetic lineages that colonized multiple locations and have since undergone range expansions, where they coexist...

Data from: Escaping peril: perceived predation risk affects migratory propensity

Kaj Hulthén, Ben B. Chapman, P. Anders Nilsson, Jerker Vinterstare, Lars-Anders Hansson, Christian Skov, Jakob Brodersen, Henrik Baktoft & Christer Brönmark
Although migratory plasticity is increasingly documented, the ecological drivers of plasticity are not well understood. Predation risk can influence migratory dynamics, but whether seasonal migrants can adjust their migratory behaviour according to perceived risk is unknown. We used electronic tags to record the migration of individual roach (Rutilus rutilus), a partially migratory fish, in the wild following exposure to manipulation of direct (predator presence/absence) and indirect (high/low roach density) perceived predation risk in experimental mesocosms....

Data from: Individual-level trait diversity concepts and indices to comprehensively describe community change in multidimensional trait space

Simone Fontana, Owen L. Petchey & Francesco Pomati
Global environmental change can influence ecosystem processes directly or through changes in the trait composition of natural communities. Traits are individual-level features of organisms, and theory predicts that diversity in traits should relate to ecosystem processes. Validated indices that account for both intra- and interspecific trait variation in multidimensional trait space are lacking. In this article, we highlight how an individual-level perspective requires new concepts for trait diversity (TD) and we validate a set of...

Data from: Stoichiometric imbalances between detritus and detritivores are related to shifts in ecosystem functioning

André Frainer, Jérémy Jabiol, Mark O. Gessner, Andreas Bruder, Eric Chauvet, Brendan McKie & Brendan G. McKie
How are resource consumption and growth rates of litter-consuming detritivores affected by imbalances between consumer and litter C:N:P ratios? To address this question, we offered leaf litter as food to three aquatic detritivore species, which represent a gradient of increasing body N:P ratios: a crustacean, a caddisfly and a stonefly. The detritivores were placed in microcosms and submerged in a natural stream. Four contrasting leaf species were offered, both singly and in two-species mixtures, to...

Data from: Inferring species interactions in ecological communities: a comparison of methods at different levels of complexity

Francesco Carrara, Andrea Giometto, Mathew Seymour, Andrea Rinaldo & Florian Altermatt
1. Natural communities commonly contain many different species and functional groups, and multiple types of species interactions act simultaneously, such as competition, predation, commensalism or mutualism. However, experimental and theoretical investigations have generally been limited by focusing on one type of interaction at a time or by a lack of a common methodological and conceptual approach to measure species interactions. 2. We compared four methods to measure and express species interactions. These approaches are, with...

Data from: Species richness, but not phylogenetic diversity, influences community biomass production and temporal stability in a re-examination of 16 grassland biodiversity studies

Patrick Venail, Kevin Gross, Todd H. Oakley, Anita Narwani, Eric Allan, Pedro Flombaum, Forest Isbell, Jasmin Joshi, Peter B. Reich, David Tilman, Jasper Van Ruijven & Bradley J. Cardinale
1.Hundreds of experiments have now manipulated species richness of various groups of organisms and examined how this aspect of biological diversity influences ecosystem functioning. Ecologists have recently expanded this field to look at whether phylogenetic diversity among species, often quantified as the sum of branch lengths on a molecular phylogeny leading to all species in a community, also predicts ecological function. Some have hypothesized that phylogenetic divergence should be a superior predictor of ecological function...

Data from: Genetic and morphological variation in sexual and asexual parasitoids of the genus Lysiphlebus: an apparent link between wing shape and reproductive mode

Andjeljko Petrović, Milana Mitrović, Ana Ivanović, Vladimir Žikić, Nickolas G. Kavallieratos, Petr Starý, Ana Mitrovski Bogdanović, Zeljko Tomanović & Christoph Vorburger
Background Endoparasitoids of aphids belonging to the genus Lysiphlebus Foerster (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Aphidiinae) comprise over 20 species that exploit over a hundred species of aphid hosts including many important pest aphid species. Within the genus Lysiphlebus two genetically and morphologically well defined species groups are recognized: the "fabarum" and the "testaceipes" group both including taxa with sexual (arrhenotoky) and asexual (thelytoky) reproduction modes. However the diverse patterns of morphological variation which include clearly distinguishable morphotypes...

Data from: Shape up or ship out: migratory behaviour predicts morphology across spatial scale in a freshwater fish

Ben B. Chapman, Kaj Hulthén, Christer Brönmark, Anders P. Nilsson, Christian Skov, Lars-Anders Hansson & Jakob Brodersen
1. Migration is a widespread phenomenon, with powerful ecological and evolutionary consequences. Morphological adaptations to reduce the energetic costs associated with migratory transport are commonly documented for migratory species. However, few studies have investigated whether variation in body morphology can be explained by variation in migratory strategy within a species. 2. We address this question in roach Rutilus rutilus, a partially migratory freshwater fish that migrates from lakes into streams during winter. We both compare...

Data from: Condition-dependent movement and dispersal in experimental metacommunities

Emanuel A. Fronhofer, Jan Klecka, Carlos J. Melián & Florian Altermatt
Dispersal and the underlying movement behaviour are processes of pivotal importance for understanding and predicting metapopulation and metacommunity dynamics. Generally, dispersal decisions are condition-dependent and rely on information in the broad sense, like the presence of conspecifics. However, studies on metacommunities that include interspecific interactions generally disregard condition-dependence. Therefore, it remains unclear whether and how dispersal in metacommunities is condition-dependent and whether rules derived from single-species contexts can be scaled up to (meta)communities. Using experimental...

Data from: Evaluating genomic divergence and parallelism in replicate ecomorphs from young and old cichlid adaptive radiations

Matthew D. McGee, Russell Y. Neches & Ole Seehausen
Comparative genomic studies of closely related species typically focus on single species pairs at one given stage of divergence. That makes it difficult to infer the continuum of evolutionary process during speciation and beyond. Here, we use whole-genome resequencing to examine genomic patterns of divergence in three sympatric cichlid species pairs with very similar functional and ecological differentiation, but different ages. We find a strong signature of increasing genomic divergence with time in both the...

Data from: Interactions among bacterial strains and fluke genotypes shape virulence of co-infection

Katja-Riikka Louhi, Lotta-Riina Sundberg, Jukka Jokela & Anssi Karvonen
Most studies of virulence of infection focus on pairwise host-parasite interactions. However, hosts are almost universally co-infected by several parasite strains and/or genotypes of the same or different species. While theory predicts that co infection favours more virulent parasite genotypes through intensified competition for host resources, knowledge of effects of genotype by genotype (G×G) interactions between unrelated parasite species on virulence of co infection is limited. Here we tested such relationship by challenging rainbow trout...

Data from: Eco-evolutionary feedbacks during experimental range expansions

Emanuel A. Fronhofer & Florian Altermatt
Understanding biological range expansions and invasions is of great ecological and economical interest. Importantly, spatial dynamics can be deeply affected by rapid evolution depending on the ecological context. Using experimental evolution in replicated microcosm landscapes and numerical analyses we show experimentally that the ecological process of range expansions leads to the evolution of increased dispersal. This evolutionary change counter-intuitively feeds back on (macro-)ecological patterns affecting the spatial distribution of population densities. While existing theory suggests...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    14

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    14

Affiliations

  • Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology
    14
  • University of Bern
    3
  • Lund University
    2
  • University of Zurich
    2
  • Institute of Entomology
    2
  • Technical University of Denmark
    2
  • Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich
    2
  • Institute for Plant Protection and Environment
    1
  • University of Nis
    1
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    1