14 Works

Data from: A multi-faceted approach testing the effects of previous bacterial exposure on resistance and tolerance

Megan A. M. Kutzer, Joachim Kurtz & Sophie A. O. Armitage
1. Hosts can alter their strategy towards pathogens during their lifetime, i.e., they can show phenotypic plasticity in immunity or life history. Immune priming is one such example, where a previous encounter with a pathogen confers enhanced protection upon secondary challenge, resulting in reduced pathogen load (i.e. resistance) and improved host survival. However, an initial encounter might also enhance tolerance, particularly to less virulent opportunistic pathogens that establish persistent infections. In this scenario, individuals are...

Data from: Resting-state gamma-band power alterations in schizophrenia reveal E/I-balance abnormalities across illness-stages

Tineke Grent-'T-Jong, Joachim Gross, Jozien Goense, Michael Wibral, Ruchika Gajwani, Andrew I. Gumley, Stephen M. Lawrie, Matthias Schwannauer, Frauke Schultze-Lutter, Tobias Navarro Schröder, Dagmar Koethe, F. Markus Leweke, Wolf Singer & Peter J. Uhlhaas
We examined alterations in E/I-balance in schizophrenia (ScZ) through measurements of resting-state gamma-band activity in participants meeting clinical high-risk (CHR) criteria (n = 88), 21 first episode (FEP) patients and 34 chronic ScZ-patients. Furthermore, MRS-data were obtained in CHR-participants and matched controls. Magnetoencephalographic (MEG) resting-state activity was examined at source level and MEG-data were correlated with neuropsychological scores and clinical symptoms. CHR-participants were characterized by increased 64–90 Hz power. In contrast, FEP- and ScZ-patients showed...

Data from: Perceptually relevant speech tracking in auditory and motor cortex reflects distinct linguistic features

Anne Keitel, Joachim Gross & Christoph Kayser
During online speech processing, our brain tracks the acoustic fluctuations in speech at different timescales. Previous research has focused on generic timescales (for example, delta or theta bands) that are assumed to map onto linguistic features such as prosody or syllables. However, given the high intersubject variability in speaking patterns, such a generic association between the timescales of brain activity and speech properties can be ambiguous. Here, we analyse speech tracking in source-localised magnetoencephalographic data...

Data from: True homoplasy of retrotransposon insertions in primates

Liliya Doronina, Olga Reising, Hiram Clawson, David A. Ray & Jürgen Schmitz
How reliable are the presence/absence insertion patterns of the supposedly homoplasy-free retrotransposons, that were randomly inserted in the quasi infinite genomic space? To systematically examine this question in an up-to-date, multi-genome comparison, we screened millions of primate transposed Alu SINE elements for incidences of homoplasious precise insertions and deletions. In genome-wide analyses, we identified and manually verified nine cases of precise parallel Alu insertions of apparently identical elements at orthologous positions in two ape lineages...

Data from: A barrier island perspective on species-area-relationships

Christoph Scherber, Hagen Andert, Rolf Niedringhaus & Teja Tscharntke
Predictions of species richness by island area are a classical cornerstone in ecology, while the specific features of barrier islands have been little appreciated. Many shorelines are occupied by barrier islands, which are shaped by offshore sedimentation processes and annual storm tide events. Hence, the appearance of these islands may vary between years if they are not protected by dykes. Here, we analyzed more than 2,990 species across 36 taxonomic groups (including vertebrates, invertebrates and...

Data from: Multiple simultaneous treatments change plant response from adaptive parental effects to within-generation plasticity, in Arabidopsis thaliana

Christian Lampei
In general, studies on plant phenotypic plasticity concentrate on plant responses to different levels of a single environmental factor. Under natural conditions, however, multiple environmental factors often vary simultaneously. I studied the consequences for lifetime fitness caused by single treatments or treatment combinations by investigating patterns of phenotypic plasticity within and between generations. The parental plants (3 genotypes of the annual plant Arabidopsis thaliana) received zero, one or two stress treatments at an early life-stage....

Data from: Genotype and diet affect resistance, survival, and fecundity but not fecundity tolerance

M. A. M. Kutzer, J. Kurtz & S. A. O. Armitage
Insects are exposed to a variety of potential pathogens in their environment, many of which can severely impact fitness and health. Consequently, hosts have evolved resistance and tolerance strategies to suppress or cope with infections. Hosts utilizing resistance improve fitness by clearing or reducing pathogen loads, and hosts utilizing tolerance reduce harmful fitness effects per pathogen load. To understand variation in, and selective pressures on, resistance and tolerance, we asked to what degree they are...

Data from: Dense infraspecific sampling reveals rapid and independent trajectories of plastome degradation in a heterotrophic orchid complex

Craig F. Barrett, Susann Wicke & Chodon Sass
Heterotrophic plants provide excellent opportunities to study the effects of altered selective regimes on genome evolution. Plastid genome (plastome) studies in heterotrophic plants are often based on one or a few highly divergent species or sequences as representatives of an entire lineage, thus missing important evolutionary-transitory events. Here we present the first infraspecific analysis of plastome evolution in any heterotrophic plant. By combining genome skimming and targeted sequence capture, we address hypotheses on the degree...

Data from: Stress and early experience underlie dominance status and division of labour in a clonal insect

Abel Bernadou, Lukas Schrader, Julia Pable, Elisabeth Hoffacker, Karen Meusemann & Juergen Heinze
Cooperation and division of labour are fundamental in the “major transitions” in evolution. While the factors regulating cell differentiation in multicellular organisms are quite well understood, we are just beginning to unveil the mechanisms underlying individual specialization in cooperative groups of animals. Clonal ants allow studying which factors influence task allocation without confounding variation in genotype and morphology. Here, we subjected larvae and freshly hatched workers of the clonal ant Platythyrea punctata to different rearing...

Data from: Proteolytic processing of palmitoylated Hedgehog peptides specifies the 3-4 intervein region of the Drosophila wing

Sabine Schürmann, Georg Steffes, Dominique Manikowski, Philipp Kastl, Ursula Malkus, Shyam Bandari, Stefanie Ohlig, Corinna Ortmann, Rocio Rebollido-Rios, Mandy Otto, Harald Nüsse, Daniel Hoffmann, Christian Klämbt, Milos Galic, Jürgen Klingauf & Kay Grobe
Cell fate determination during development often requires morphogen transport from producing to distant responding cells. Hedgehog (Hh) morphogens present a challenge to this concept, as all Hhs are synthesized as terminally lipidated molecules that form insoluble clusters at the surface of producing cells. While several proposed Hh transport modes tie directly into these unusual properties, the crucial step of Hh relay from producing cells to receptors on remote responding cells remains unresolved. Using wing development...

Data from: X-ray computed tomography and its potential in ecological research: a review of studies and optimization of specimen preparation

Yeisson Gutiérrez, David Ott, Mareike Töpperwien, Tim Salditt & Christoph Scherber
Imaging techniques are a cornerstone of contemporary biology. Over the last decades, advances in micro-scale imaging techniques have allowed fascinating new insights into cell and tissue morphology and internal anatomy of organisms across kingdoms. However, most studies so far provided snapshots of given reference taxa, describing organs and tissues under “idealized” conditions. Surprisingly, there is an almost complete lack of studies investigating how an organism´s internal morphology changes in response to environmental drivers. Consequently, ecology...

Data from: Thermal limits in native and alien freshwater peracarid Crustacea: the role of habitat use and oxygen limitation

Wilco C.E.P. Verberk, Rob S.E.W. Leuven, Gerard Van Der Velde & Friederike Gabel
1. In order to predict which species can successfully cope with global warming and how other environmental stressors modulate their vulnerability to climate related environmental factors, an understanding of the ecophysiology underpinning thermal limits is essential for both conservation biology a nd invasion biology. 2. Heat tolerance and the extent to which heat tolerance differed with oxygen availability were examined for four native and four alien freshwater peracarid crustacean species, with differences in habitat use...

Data from: Parasite-infected sticklebacks increase the risk-taking behavior of uninfected group members

Nicolle Demandt, Benedikt Saus, Ralf H.J.M. Kurvers, Jens Krause, Joachim Kurtz, Jörn P. Scharsack & Ralf H. J. M. Kurvers
Trophically transmitted parasites frequently increase their hosts' risk-taking behaviour, to facilitate transmission to the next host. Whether such elevated risk-taking can spill over to uninfected group members is, however, unknown. To investigate this, we confronted groups of six three-spined sticklebacks, Gasterosteus aculeatus, containing 0, 2, 4 or 6 experimentally infected individuals with a simulated bird attack and studied their risk-taking behaviour. As a parasite, we used the tapeworm Schistocephalus solidus, which increases the risk-taking of...

Data from: Divergence in sex peptide-mediated female post-mating responses in Drosophila melanogaster

Kristina U. Wensing & Claudia Fricke
Transfer and receipt of seminal fluid proteins crucially affect reproductive processes in animals. Evolution in these male ejaculatory proteins is explained with post-mating sexual selection, but we lack a good understanding of the evolution of female post-mating responses to these proteins. Some of these proteins are expected to mediate sexually antagonistic coevolution generating the expectation that females evolve resistance. One candidate in Drosophila melanogaster is the sex peptide (SP) which confers cost of mating in...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    14

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    14

Affiliations

  • University of Münster
    14
  • University of Glasgow
    2
  • Institute of Landscape Ecology
    2
  • University of Göttingen
    2
  • University of Hohenheim
    1
  • West Virginia University
    1
  • Radboud University Nijmegen
    1
  • University of California, Berkeley
    1
  • University of Regensburg
    1
  • University of Edinburgh
    1