22 Works

Data from: Next-generation sequencing for molecular ecology: a caveat regarding pooled samples

Eric C. Anderson, Hans J. Skaug & Daniel J. Barshis
We develop a model based on the Dirichlet-compound multinomial distribution (CMD) and Ewens sampling formula to predict the fraction of SNP loci that will appear fixed for alternate alleles between two pooled samples drawn from the same underlying population. We apply this model to next-generation sequencing (NGS) data from Baltic Sea herring recently published by (Corander et al., , Molecular Ecology, 2931–2940), and show that there are many more fixed loci than expected in the...

Data from: Inferring the contribution of sexual reproduction, migration and off-season survival to the temporal maintenance of microbial populations: a case study on the wheat fungal pathogen Puccinia striiformis f.sp. tritici

Sajid Ali, Pierre Gladieux, Hidayatur Rahman, Muhammad Shahab Saqib, Muhammad Fiaz, Habib Ahmed, Marc Leconte, Angélique Gautier, Annemarie Fejer Justesen, Mogens Støvring Hovmøller, Jérôme Enjalbert & Claude De Vallavieille-Pope
Understanding the mode of temporal maintenance of plant pathogens is an important domain of microbial ecology research. Due to the inconspicuous nature of microbes, their temporal maintenance cannot be studied directly through tracking individuals and their progeny. Here, we suggest a series of population genetic analyses on molecular marker variation in temporally-spaced samples to infer about the relative contribution of sexual reproduction, off-season survival and migration in the temporal maintenance of pathogen populations. We used...

Data from: Phylogenomics resolves evolutionary relationships among ants, bees, and wasps

Brian R. Johnson, Marek L. Borowiec, Joanna C. Chiu, Ernest K. Lee, Joel Atallah & Philip S. Ward
Eusocial behavior has arisen in few animal groups, most notably in the aculeate Hymenoptera, a clade comprising ants, bees, and stinging wasps. Phylogeny is crucial to understanding the evolution of the salient features of these insects, including eusociality. Yet the phylogenetic relationships among the major lineages of aculeate Hymenoptera remain contentious. We address this problem here by generating and analyzing genomic data for a representative series of taxa. We obtain a single well-resolved and strongly...

Data from: Down-regulation of Rad51 activity during meiosis in yeast prevents competition with Dmc1 for repair of double-strand breaks

Yan Liu, William A. Gaines, Tracy Callender, Valeria Busygina, Ashwini Oke, Patrick Sung, Jennifer C. Fung & Nancy M. Hollingsworth
Interhomolog recombination plays a critical role in promoting proper meiotic chromosome segregation but a mechanistic understanding of this process is far from complete. In vegetative cells, Rad51 is a highly conserved recombinase that exhibits a preference for repairing double strand breaks (DSBs) using sister chromatids, in contrast to the conserved, meiosis-specific recombinase, Dmc1, which preferentially repairs programmed DSBs using homologs. Despite the different preferences for repair templates, both Rad51 and Dmc1 are required for interhomolog...

Data from: The quantitative genetics of physiological and morphological traits in an invasive terrestrial snail: additive versus non-additive genetic variation

Roberto F. Nespolo, Jose Luis Bartheld, Avia González, Andrea Bruning, Derek A. Roff, Leonardo D. Bacigalupe & Juan Diego Gaitan
1. The distribution of additive versus non-additive genetic variation in natural populations represents a central topic of research in evolutionary/organismal biology. For evolutionary physiologists, functional or whole-animal performance traits (“physiological traits”) are frequently studied assuming they are heritable and variable in populations. 2. Physiological traits of evolutionary relevance are those functional capacities measured at the whole-organism level, with a potential impact on fitness. They can be classified as capacities (or performances) or costs, the former...

Data from: Extending ecological niche models to the past 120 000 years corroborates the lack of strong phylogeographic structure in the Crested Drongo (Dicrurus forficatus forficatus) on Madagascar

Jérôme Fuchs, Juan L. Parra, Steven M. Goodman, Marie Jeanne Raherilalao, Jeremy Vanderwal & Rauri C. K. Bowie
We conduct a phylogeographic study of the Crested Drongo (Dicrurus forficatus forficatus), a broadly distributed bird species on Madagascar. We first determined the demographic and spatial pattern inferred from mitochondrial and nuclear data, and then compared these results with predictions from a present to 0.120-Myr-old reconstruction of the spatial dynamics of the range of D. f. forficatus on Madagascar, enabling putative areas of stability (lineage persistence) to be detected. Weak genetic structure along an east–west...

Data from: Paths to selection on life history loci in different natural environments across the native range of Arabidopsis thaliana

Alexandre Fournier-Level, Amity M. Wilczek, Martha D. Cooper, Judith L. Roe, Jillian Anderson, Deren Eaton, Brook T. Moyers, Renee H. Petipas, Robert N. Schaeffer, Bjorn Pieper, Matthieu Reymond, Maarten Koornneef, Stephen M. Welch, David L. Remington & Johanna Schmitt
Selection on quantitative trait loci (QTL) may vary among natural environments due to differences in the genetic architecture of traits, environment-specific allelic effects or changes in the direction and magnitude of selection on specific traits. To dissect the environmental differences in selection on life history QTL across climatic regions, we grew a panel of interconnected recombinant inbred lines (RILs) of Arabidopsis thaliana in four field sites across its native European range. For each environment, we...

Data from: Diversification of the monoterpene synthase gene family (TPSb) in Protium, a highly diverse genus of tropical trees

Felipe Zapata, Paul V. A. Fine & Paul V.A. Fine
Plant monoterpenes are a diverse class of secondary metabolites mediating biotic and abiotic interactions with direct effects on plant fitness. To evaluate the hypothesis that monoterpene diversity is related to functional diversification after gene duplication, we reconstructed the evolutionary history of monoterpene synthases (TPSb) – the genes underlying monoterpene synthesis – in Protium, a taxonomically and chemically diverse genus of tropical trees. We isolated multiple copies of TPSb genes from chemically divergent Protium species, reconstructed...

Data from: An adaptive radiation of frogs in a Southeast Asian island archipelago

David C. Blackburn, Cameron D. Siler, Arvin C. Diesmos, Jimmy A. McGuire, David C. Cannatella & Rafe M. Brown
Living amphibians exhibit a diversity of ecologies, life histories, and species-rich lineages that offers opportunities for studies of adaptive radiation. We characterize a diverse clade of frogs (Kaloula, Microhylidae) in the Philippine island archipelago as an example of an adaptive radiation into three primary habitat specialists or ecotypes. We use a novel phylogenetic estimate for this clade to evaluate the tempo of lineage accumulation and morphological diversification. Because species-level phylogenetic estimates for Philippine Kaloula are...

Data from: Geographic variation in morphology of Dark-eyed Juncos and implications for population divergence

Elise D. Ferree
Geographic variation in morphology that develops among closely related populations can help drive genetic divergence, and eventually speciation, when those morphological traits are the basis for social interactions that influence reproduction. The North American Dark-eyed junco (Junco hyemalis) complex is an interesting case in speciation. The numerous subspecies have distinct breeding ranges and unique plumage coloration, but based on the presence of hybrid populations and recent genetic data, can be considered to belong to a...

Data from: Ecological speciation in anemone-associated snapping shrimps (Alpheus armatus species complex)

Carla Hurt, Katie Silliman, Arthur Anker & Nancy Knowlton
Divergent natural selection driven by competition for limited resources can promote speciation, even in the presence of gene flow. Reproductive isolation is more likely to result from divergent selection when the partitioned resource is closely linked to mating. Obligate symbiosis and host fidelity (mating on or near the host) can provide this link, creating ideal conditions for speciation in the absence of physical barriers to dispersal. Symbiotic organisms often experience competition for hosts, and host...

Data from: Unlocking the vault: next generation museum population genomics

Ke Bi, Tyler Linderoth, Dan Vanderpool, Jeffrey M. Good, Rasmus Nielsen & Craig Moritz
Natural history museum collections provide unique resources for understanding how species respond to environmental change, including the abrupt, anthropogenic climate change of the past century. Ideally, researchers would conduct genome-scale screening of museum specimens to explore the evolutionary consequences of environmental changes, but to date such analyses have been severely limited by the numerous challenges of working with the highly degraded DNA typical of historic samples. Here we circumvent these challenges by using custom, multiplexed,...

Data from: Postglacial recolonization history of the European crabapple (Malus sylvestris Mill.), a wild contributor to the domesticated apple

Amandine Cornille, Tatiana Giraud, Céline Bellard, Aurélien Tellier, Bruno Le Cam, Marinus J. Smulders, Jörg Kleinschmit, Isabel Roldán-Ruiz & Pierre Gladieux
Understanding the way in which the climatic oscillations of the Quaternary Period have shaped the distribution and genetic structure of extant tree species provides insight into the processes driving species diversification, distribution and survival. Deciphering the genetic consequences of past climatic change is also critical for the conservation and sustainable management of forest and tree genetic resources, a timely endeavour as the Earth heads into a period of fast climate change. We used a combination...

Data from: Large-scale parentage analysis reveals reproductive patterns and heritability of spawn timing in a hatchery population of steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

Alicia Abadía-Cardoso, Eric C. Anderson, Devon E. Pearse & John Carlos Garza
Understanding life history traits is an important first step in formulating effective conservation and management strategies. The use of artificial propagation and supplementation as such a strategy can have numerous effects on the supplemented natural populations and minimizing life history divergence is crucial in minimizing these effects. Here, we use single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotypes for large-scale parentage analysis and pedigree reconstruction in a hatchery population of steelhead, the anadromous form of rainbow trout. Nearly...

Data from: Patterns and processes in complex landscapes: testing alternative biogeographic hypotheses through integrated analysis of phylogeography and community ecology in Hawai'i

Jon Eldon, Jonathan P. Price, Donald K. Price & Karl Magnacca
The Island of Hawai‘i is a dynamic assemblage of five volcanoes with wet forest habitat currently existing in four distinct natural regions that vary in area, age, and geographic isolation. In this complex landscape, alternative assumptions of the relative importance of specific habitat characteristics on evolutionary and ecological processes predict strikingly different general patterns of local diversity and regional similarity. In this study we compare alternative a priori hypotheses against observed patterns within two distinct...

Data from: Parallel evolution of local adaptation and reproductive isolation in the face of gene flow

Roger K. Butlin, Maria Saura, Grégory Charrier, Benjamin Jackson, Carl André, Armando Caballero, Jerry A. Coyne, Juan Galindo, John W. Grahame, Johann Hollander, Petri Kemppainen, Mónica Martínez-Fernández, Marina Panova, Humberto Quesada, Kerstin Johannesson, Emilio Rolán-Alvarez & Johan Hollander
Parallel evolution of similar phenotypes provides strong evidence for the operation of natural selection. Where these phenotypes contribute to reproductive isolation, they further support a role for divergent, habitat-associated selection in speciation. However, the observation of pairs of divergent ecotypes currently occupying contrasting habitats in distinct geographical regions is not sufficient to infer parallel origins. Here we show striking parallel phenotypic divergence between populations of the rocky-shore gastropod, Littorina saxatilis, occupying contrasting habitats exposed to...

Data from: Crop-to-wild gene flow and spatial genetic structure in the closest wild relatives of the cultivated apple

Amandine Cornille, Pierre Gladieux & Tatiana Giraud
Crop-to-wild gene flow have important evolutionary and ecological consequences and require careful consideration in conservation programs for wild genetic resources of potential use in breeding programs and in assessments of the risk of transgene escape into natural ecosystems. Using 26 microsatellites and a set of 1181 trees, we investigated the extent of introgression from the cultivated apple, Malus domestica, to its three closest wild relatives, M. sylvestris in Europe, M. orientalis in the Caucasus and...

Data from: Artificial bat roosts did not accelerate forest regeneration in abandoned pastures in southern Costa Rica

J. Leighton Reid, Ellen K. Holste & Rakan A. Zahawi
Artificial roosts have been proposed as a tool for augmenting bat populations and catalyzing tropical forest regeneration. In the best case scenario, roosts would attract seed-carrying bats (Family Phyllostomidae) into degraded pastures and form nucleating patches of native vegetation. We tested this scenario by monitoring 48 artificial roosts in pastures and adjacent forest fragments in southern Costa Rica over 2 years. Half of the pasture roosts were exposed to direct sunlight and half were affixed...

Data from: Convergent evolution in the territorial communication of a classic adaptive radiation: Caribbean Anolis lizards

Terry J. Ord, Judy A. Stamps & Jonathan B. Losos
To demonstrate adaptive convergent evolution, it must be shown that shared phenotypes have evolved independently in different lineages and that a credible selection pressure underlies adaptive evolution. There are a number of robust examples of adaptive convergence in morphology for which both these criteria have been met, but examples from animal behaviour have rarely been tested as rigorously. Adaptive convergence should be common in behaviour, especially behaviour used for communication, because the environment often shapes...

Data from: Population structure of the oldest known macroscopic communities from Mistaken Point, Newfoundland

Simon A. F. Darroch, Marc Laflamme & Matthew E. Clapham
The presumed affinities of the Terminal Neoproterozoic Ediacara biota have been much debated. However, even in the absence of concrete evidence for phylogenetic affinity, numerical paleoecological approaches can be effectively used to make inferences about organismal biology, the nature of biotic interactions, and life history. Here, we examine the population structure of three Ediacaran rangeomorph taxa (Fractofusus, Beothukis, and Pectinofrons), and one non-rangeomorph taxon (Thectardis) across five fossil surfaces around the Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland, through...

Data from: Molecular phylogenetics of squirrelfishes and soldierfishes (Teleostei:Beryciformes: Holocentridae): reconciling more than 100 years of taxonomic confusion

Alex Dornburg, Jon A. Moore, Rachel Webster, Dan L. Warren, Matthew C. Brandley, Teresa L. Iglesias, Peter C. Wainwright & Thomas J. Near
Squirrelfishes and soldierfishes (Holocentridae) are among the most conspicuous species in the nocturnal reef fish community. However, there is no clear consensus regarding their evolutionary relationships, which is reflected in a complicated taxonomic history. We collected DNA sequence data from multiple single copy nuclear genes and one mitochondrial gene sampled from over fifty percent of the recognized holocentrid species and infer the first species-level phylogeny of the Holocentridae. Our results strongly support the monophyly of...

Data from: Hemocyanin gene family evolution in spiders (Araneae), with implications for phylogenetic relationships and divergence times in the infraorder Mygalomorphae

James Starrett, Marshal Hedin, Nadia Ayoub & Cheryl Y. Hayashi
Hemocyanins are multimeric copper-containing hemolymph proteins involved in oxygen binding and transport in all major arthropod lineages. Most arachnids have seven primary subunits (encoded by paralogous genes a–g), which combine to form a 24-mer (4 × 6) quaternary structure. Within some spider lineages, however, hemocyanin evolution has been a dynamic process with extensive paralog duplication and loss. We have obtained hemocyanin gene sequences from numerous representatives of the spider infraorders Mygalomorphae and Araneomorphae in order...

Registration Year

  • 2013
    22

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    22

Affiliations

  • University of California System
    22
  • University of California, Berkeley
    3
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    3
  • Yale University
    3
  • Southwest Fisheries Science Center
    2
  • University of Kansas
    1
  • National Museum
    1
  • University of Montana
    1
  • The University of Texas at Austin
    1
  • Field Museum of Natural History
    1