450 Works

Data from: Rapid change in the thermal tolerance of a tropical lizard

Manuel Leal & Alex R. Gunderson
The predominant view is that the thermal physiology of tropical ectotherms, including lizards, is not labile over ecological timescales. We used the recent introduction (∼35 years ago) of the Puerto Rican lizard Anolis cristatellus to Miami, Florida, to test this thermal rigidity hypothesis. We measured lower (critical thermal minimum [CTmin]) and upper (critical thermal maximum [CTmax]) thermal tolerances and found that the introduced population tolerates significantly colder temperatures (by ∼3°C) than does the Puerto Rican...

Data from: A gain-of-function polymorphism controlling complex traits and fitness in nature

Kasavajhala V. S. K. Prasad, Bao-Hua Song, Carrie Olson-Manning, Jill T. Anderson, Cheng-Ruei Lee, M. Eric Schranz, Aaron J. Windsor, Maria J. Clauss, Antonio J. Manzaneda, Ibtehaj Naqvi, Michael Reichelt, Jonathan Gershenzon, Sanjeewa G. Rupasinghe, Mary A. Schuler & Thomas Mitchell-Olds
Identification of the causal genes that control complex trait variation remains challenging, limiting our appreciation of the evolutionary processes that influence polymorphisms in nature. We cloned a quantitative trait locus that controls plant defensive chemistry, damage by insect herbivores, survival, and reproduction in the natural environments where this polymorphism evolved. These ecological effects are driven by duplications in the BCMA (branched-chain methionine allocation) loci controlling this variation and by two selectively favored amino acid changes...

Data from: Aging in the natural world: comparative data reveal similar mortality patterns across primates

Anne M. Bronikowski, Jeanne Altmann, Diane K. Brockman, Marina Cords, Linda M. Fedigan, Anne Pusey, Tara Stoinski, William F. Morris, Karen B. Strier & Susan C. Alberts
Human senescence patterns – late onset of mortality increase, slow mortality acceleration, and exceptional longevity – are often described as unique in the animal world. Using an individual-based dataset from longitudinal studies of wild populations of seven primate species, we show that contrary to assumptions of human uniqueness, human senescence falls within the primate continuum of aging, the tendency for males to have shorter lifespans and higher age-specific mortality than females throughout much of adulthood...

Data from: Two-phase increase in the maximum size of life over 3.5 billion years reflects biological innovation and environmental opportunity

Jonathan L. Payne, Alison G. Boyer, James H. Brown, Seth Finnegan, Michal Kowaleski, , S. Kathleen Lyons, Craig R. McClain, Daniel W. McShea, Phillip M. Novack-Gottshall, Felisa A. Smith, Jennifer A. Stempien, Steve C. Wang, M. Kowalewski & R. A. Krause
NOTE: See also http://bodysize.nescent.org. ABSTRACT: The maximum size of organisms has increased enormously since the initial appearance of life >3.5 billion years ago (Gya), but the pattern and timing of this size increase is poorly known. Consequently, controls underlying the size spectrum of the global biota have been difficult to evaluate. Our period-level compilation of the largest known fossil organisms demonstrates that maximum size increased by 16 orders of magnitude since life first appeared in...

Data from: Genetic tradeoffs and conditional neutrality contribute to local adaptation

Jill T. Anderson, Cheng-Ruei Lee, Catherine A. Rushworth, Robert I. Colautti & Thomas Mitchell-Olds
Divergent natural selection promotes local adaptation and can lead to reproductive isolation of populations in contrasting environments; however, the genetic basis of local adaptation remains largely unresolved in natural populations. Local adaptation might result from antagonistic pleiotropy, where alternate alleles are favored in distinct habitats, and polymorphism is maintained by selection. Alternatively, under conditional neutrality some alleles may be favored in one environment but neutral at other locations. Antagonistic pleiotropy maintains genetic variation across the...

Data from: Host genotype and age shape the leaf and root microbiomes of a wild perennial plant

Maggie R. Wagner, Derek S. Lundberg, Tijana G. Del Rio, Susannah G. Tringe, Jeffery L. Dangl & Thomas Mitchell-Olds
Bacteria living on and in leaves and roots influence many aspects of plant health, so the extent of a plant’s genetic control over its microbiota is of great interest to crop breeders and evolutionary biologists. Laboratory-based studies, because they poorly simulate true environmental heterogeneity, may misestimate or totally miss the influence of certain host genes on the microbiome. Here we report a large-scale field experiment to disentangle the effects of genotype, environment, age and year...

Data from: Assessing the joint behavior of species traits as filtered by environment

Erin M. Schliep, Alan E. Gelfand, Rachel M. Mitchell, Matthew E. Aiello-Lammens, & John A. Silander
Understanding and predicting how species traits are shaped by prevailing environmental conditions is an important yet challenging task in ecology. Functional trait based approaches can replace potentially idiosyncratic species-specific response models in learning about community behavior across environmental gradients. Customarily, models for traits given environment consider only trait means to predict species and functional diversity, as intra-taxon variability in traits is often thought to be negligible. A growing body of literature indicates that intra-taxon trait...

Data from: Reproductive sharing in relation to group and colony-level attributes in a cooperative breeding fish

Jennifer K. Hellmann, Isaac Y. Ligocki, Constance M. O'Connor, Adam R. Reddon, Kelly A. Garvy, Susan E. Marsh-Rollo, H. Lisle Gibbs, Sigal Balshine & Ian M. Hamilton
The degree to which group members share reproduction is dictated by both within-group (e.g. group size and composition) and between-group (e.g. density and position of neighbours) characteristics. While many studies have investigated reproductive patterns within social groups, few have simultaneously explored how within-group and between-group social structure influence these patterns. Here, we investigated how group size and composition, along with territory density and location within the colony, influenced parentage in 36 wild groups of a...

Data from: Phytochrome diversity in green plants and the origin of canonical plant phytochromes

Fay-Wei Li, Michael Melkonian, Carl J. Rothfels, Juan Carlos Villarreal, Dennis W. Stevenson, Sean W. Graham, Gane Ka-Shu Wong, Kathleen M. Pryer & Sarah Mathews
Phytochromes are red/far-red photoreceptors that play essential roles in diverse plant morphogenetic and physiological responses to light. Despite their functional significance, phytochrome diversity and evolution across photosynthetic eukaryotes remain poorly understood. Using newly available transcriptomic and genomic data we show that canonical plant phytochromes originated in a common ancestor of streptophytes (charophyte algae and land plants). Phytochromes in charophyte algae are structurally diverse, including canonical and non-canonical forms, whereas in land plants, phytochrome structure is...

Data from: A test for repertoire matching in eastern song sparrows

Adrienne L. DuBois, Stephen Nowicki & William A. Searcy
Repertoire matching occurs when one songbird replies to another with a song type that the two birds share. Repertoire matching has previously been demonstrated to occur at well above chance levels in a western population of song sparrows, where it is hypothesized to serve as a low level threat in a hierarchy of aggressive signals. Here we test for repertoire matching in an eastern population of song sparrows. Previous work indicates that this eastern population...

Evaluating the effects of land-use change and future climate change on vulnerability of coastal landscapes to saltwater intrusion

Abinash Bhattachan, Ryan Emanuel, Marcelo Ardon, Emily Bernhardt, Steven Anderson, Matthew Stillwagon, Emily Ury, Todd Bendor & Justin Wright
The exposure of freshwater-dependent coastal ecosystems to saltwater is a present-day impact of climate and land-use changes in many coastal regions, with the potential to harm freshwater and terrestrial biota, alter biogeochemical cycles and reduce agricultural yields. Land-use activities associated with artificial drainage infrastructure (canals, ditches, and drains) could exacerbate saltwater exposure. However, studies assessing the effects of artificial drainage on the vulnerability of coastal landscapes to saltwater exposure are lacking. We examined the extent...

Data from: Widespread generalist clones are associated with range and niche expansion in allopolyploids of Pacific Northwest Hawthorns (Crataegus L.)

Jennifer M. Coughlan, S. Han, Saša Stefanović & Timothy A. Dickinson
Range and niche expansion are commonly associated with transitions to asexuality, polyploidy, and hybridity (allopolyploidy) in plants. The ability of asexual polyploids to colonize novel habitats may be due to widespread generalist clones, multiple ecologically specialized clones, or may be a neutral byproduct of multiple, independent origins of asexual polyploids throughout the range. We have quantified niche size and divergence for hawthorns of the Pacific Northwest using data from herbarium vouchers with known cytotypes. We...

Data from: Leaf hydraulic parameters are more plastic in species that experience a wider range of leaf water potentials

Daniel M. Johnson, Z. Carter Berry, Kathyrn V. Baker, Duncan D. Smith, Katherine A. McCulloh, Jean-Christophe Domec & Kathryn V. Baker
1. Many plant species experience large differences in soil moisture availability within a season, potentially leading to a wide range of leaf water potentials (ΨLEAF). In order to decrease the risk of leaf dehydration, among species, there is a continuum ranging from strict control (isohydry) to little control (anisohydry) of minimum ΨLEAF. 2. In central Texas USA, species are exposed to a range of soil moisture from wet springs to hot, dry summers. There are...

Data from: Fossil lemurs from Egypt and Kenya suggest an African origin for Madagascar’s aye-aye

Gregg F. Gunnell, Doug M. Boyer, Anthony F. Friscia, Steven Heritage, Fredrick K. Manthi, Ellen R. Miller, Hesham M. Sallam, Nancy B. Simmons, Nancy J. Stevens & Erik R. Seiffert
In 1967 G.G. Simpson described three partial mandibles from early Miocene deposits in Kenya that he interpreted as belonging to a new strepsirrhine primate, Propotto. This interpretation was quickly challenged, with the assertion that Propotto was not a primate, but rather a pteropodid fruit bat. The latter interpretation has not been questioned for almost half a century. Here we re-evaluate the affinities of Propotto, drawing upon diverse lines of evidence to establish that this strange...

High social status males experience accelerated epigenetic aging in wild baboons

Jordan Anderson, Rachel Johnston, Amanda Lea, Fernando Campos, Tawni Voyles, Mercy Akinyi, Susan Alberts, Elizabeth Archie & Jenny Tung
Aging, for virtually all life, is inescapable. However, within populations, biological aging rates vary. Understanding sources of variation in this process is central to understanding the biodemography of natural populations. We constructed a DNA methylation-based age predictor for an intensively studied wild baboon population in Kenya. Consistent with findings in humans, the resulting “epigenetic clock” closely tracks chronological age, but individuals are predicted to be somewhat older or younger than their known ages. Surprisingly, these...

Glucocorticoid exposure predicts survival in female baboons

Fernando Campos, Elizabeth Archie, Laurence Gesquiere, Jenny Tung, Jeanne Altmann & Susan Alberts
Are differences in HPA axis activation across the adult lifespan linked to differences in survival? This question has been the subject of considerable debate. We analyze the link between survival and fecal glucocorticoid (GC) measures in a wild primate population, leveraging an unusually extensive longitudinal dataset of 14,173 GC measurements from 242 adult female baboons over 1,634 female-years. We document a powerful link between GCs and survival: females with relatively high current GCs or high...

Flood-stimulated herbivory drives range retraction of a plant ecosystem

Camila Rocca, Pedro Daleo, Jesús D. Nuñez, Brian Silliman, Oscar Iribarne, Christine Angelini & Juan Alberti
Climate change is generating extreme climate events, affecting ecosystem integrity and function directly through increases in abiotic stress and disturbance and indirectly through changes in the strength of biotic interactions. As consumers play an essential role in ecosystem functioning and have been shown to be highly sensitive to climate conditions, improved understanding of their role under changing environmental conditions is necessary to accurately anticipate climate change impacts on ecosystem integrity. We evaluated if prolonged heavy...

A VIVO Community Update: Reflections on the Last Year and Where We Are Headed

Bruce Herbert, Anna Guillaumet, Terrie Wheeler, Douglas Hahn & Julia Trimmer

Climate warming threatens the persistence of a community of disturbance-adapted native annual plants

Paul Reed, Scott Bridgham, Laurel Pfeifer-Meister, Megan Peterson, Bart Johnson, Bitty Roy, Graham Bailes, Aaron Nelson, William Morris & Daniel Doak
With ongoing climate change, populations are expected to exhibit shifts in demographic performance that will alter where a species can persist. This presents unique challenges for managing plant populations and may require ongoing interventions, including in-situ management or introduction into new locations. However, few studies have examined how climate change may affect plant demographic performance for a suite of species, or how effective management actions could be in mitigating climate change effects. Over the course...

Monetary Policy Implementation in a Negative Rate Environment

Michael Boutros & Jonathan Witmer
Monetary policy implementation could, in theory, be constrained by deeply negative rates since overnight market participants may have an incentive to invest in cash rather than lend to other participants. To understand the functioning of overnight markets in such an environment, we add the option to exchange central bank reserves for cash to the standard workhorse model of monetary policy implementation (Poole 1968). Importantly, we show that monetary policy is not constrained when just the...

Data from: Phylogenetic structure in the Sphagnum recurvum complex (Bryophyta: Sphagnaceae) relative to taxonomy and geography

Aaron Duffy, Blanka Aguero, Hans Stenoien, Kjell Ivar Flatberg, Michael S. Ignatov, Kristian Hassel & Jonathan Shaw
METHODS RADseq analyses were applied to a sample of 384 collections representing the European, North American, and (to a lesser extent) Asian ranges of the complex. The data were subjected to maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses and analyses of genetic structure using the software, STRUCTURE, and multivariate ordination approaches. RESULTS Defined phylogenetically, the S. recurvum complex includes S. angustifolium , S. fallax , S. flexuosum , S. pacificum , and S. recurvum , as distinct clades...

Value of Curation Survey, January 2021

Lisa R Johnston, Renata Gonçalves Curty, Sophia Lafferty-Hess, Hannah Hadley, Jonathan Petters, Hoa Luong, Susan Braxton, Jake Carlson & Wendy A Kozlowski

Large herbivores suppress liana infestation in an African savanna

Tyler C. Coverdale, Ryan D. O'Connell, Matthew C. Hutchinson, Amanda Savagian, Tyler R. Kartzinel, Todd M. Palmer, Jacob R. Goheen, David J. Augustine, Mahesh Sankaran, Corina E. Tarnita & Robert M. Pringle
African savannas are the last stronghold of diverse large-mammal communities, and a major focus of savanna ecology is to understand how these animals affect the relative abundance of trees and grasses. However, savannas support diverse plant life-forms, and human-induced changes in large-herbivore assemblages—declining wildlife populations and their displacement by livestock—may cause unexpected shifts in plant community composition. We investigated how herbivory affects the prevalence of lianas (woody vines) and their impact on trees in an...

An invasive species erodes the performance of coastal wetland protected areas

Junlin Ren, Jianshe Chen, Changlin Xu, Johan Van De Koppel, Mads Thomsen, Shi-Yun Qiu, Fangyan Cheng, Wanjuan Song, Quan-Xing Liu, Chi Xu, Junhong Bai, Yihui Zhang, Baoshan Cui, Mark Bertness, Brian Silliman, Bo Li & Qiang He
The world has increasingly relied upon protected areas (PAs) to rescue highly valued ecosystems from human activities, but whether PAs will fare well with bioinvasions remains unknown. By analyzing three decades of seven largest coastal PAs in China, including multiple World Natural Heritage and/or Wetlands of International Importance sites, we show that although PAs are achieving success in rescuing iconic wetlands and critical shorebird habitats from once widespread reclamation, this success is counteracted by escalating...

SI dataset S1 - knuckle-walking biomechanical strategies

Julia Arias-Martorell, Angel Zeininger & Tracy Kivell
African apes engage in a distinct form of locomotion called knuckle-walking, but there is much ambiguity as to when and how this locomotor behaviour evolved. This study aims to elucidate potential differences in knuckle-walking elbow posture and loading in African apes through the study of trabecular bone. Using a whole-epiphysis approach, we quantified variation in trabecular structure of the distal humerus of chimpanzees, western lowland gorillas, and mountain gorillas in comparison to orang-utans, siamangs and...

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