53 Works

Data from: Using the Phenoscape Knowledgebase to relate genetic perturbations to phenotypic evolution

Prashanti Manda, James P. Balhoff, Hilmar Lapp, Paula Mabee & Todd J. Vision
The abundance of phenotypic diversity among species can enrich our knowledge of development and genetics beyond the limits of variation that can be observed in model organisms. The Phenoscape Knowledgebase (KB) is designed to enable exploration and discovery of phenotypic variation among species. Because phenotypes in the KB are annotated using standard ontologies, evolutionary phenotypes can be compared with phenotypes from genetic perturbations in model organisms. To illustrate the power of this approach, we review...

Data from: Genetic stock composition of marine bycatch reveals disproportional impacts on depleted river herring genetic stocks

Daniel J. Hasselman, Eric C. Anderson, Emily E. Argo, N. David Bethoney, Stephen R. Gephard, David M. Post, Bradley P. Schondelmeier, Thomas F. Schultz, Theodore V. Willis & Eric P. Palkovacs
Bycatch of mid-trophic level anadromous fishes that connect marine and freshwater ecosystems is a growing conservation concern. Anadromous alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) and blueback herring (A. aestivalis) are important components of coastal freshwater and marine food webs, but have experienced dramatic declines in the abundances of spawning adults. Freshwater-focused restoration efforts have yielded few consistent signs of recovery; raising concerns that bycatch in Northwest Atlantic commercial fisheries may be negating these conservation actions. Using data from...

Data from: Fluctuating, warm temperatures decrease the effect of a key floral repressor on flowering time in Arabidopsis thaliana

Liana T. Burghardt, Daniel E. Runcie, Amity M. Wilczek, Martha D. Cooper, Judith L. Roe, Stephen M. Welch & Johanna Schmitt
The genetic basis of growth and development is often studied in constant laboratory environments; however, the environmental conditions that organisms experience in nature are often much more dynamic. We examined how daily temperature fluctuations, average temperature, day length and vernalization influence the flowering time of 59 genotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana with allelic perturbations known to affect flowering time. For a subset of genotypes, we also assessed treatment effects on morphology and growth. We identified 17...

Data from: Disruption of endosperm development is a major cause of hybrid seed inviability between Mimulus guttatus and Mimulus nudatus

Elen Oneal, John H. Willis & Robert G. Franks
Divergence of developmental mechanisms within populations could lead to hybrid developmental failure, and might be a factor driving speciation in angiosperms. We investigate patterns of endosperm and embryo development in Mimulus guttatus and the closely related, serpentine endemic Mimulus nudatus, and compare them to those of reciprocal hybrid seed. We address whether disruption in hybrid seed development is the primary source of reproductive isolation between these sympatric taxa. M. guttatus and M. nudatus differ in...

Data from: Large wildlife removal drives immune defense increases in rodents

Hillary S. Young, Rodolfo Dirzo, Kristofer M. Helgen, Douglas J. McCauley, Charles L. Nunn, Paul Snyder, Kari E. Veblen, Serena Zhao & Vanessa O. Ezenwa
Anthropogenic disturbances involving land use change, climate disruption, pollution, and invasive species have been shown to impact immune function of wild animals. These immune changes have direct impacts on the fitness of impacted animals and, also, potentially indirect effects on other species and on ecological processes, notably involving the spread of infectious disease. Here, we investigate whether the selective loss of large wildlife can also drive changes in immune function of other consumer species. Using...

Data from: Multiple environmental drivers structure plant traits at the community level in a pyrogenic ecosystem

Gregory M. Ames, Steven M. Anderson & Justin P. Wright
Trait-based approaches offer a way to predict changes in community structure along environmental gradients using measurable properties of individuals. Promoted as being generalizable across systems, trait-based approaches benefit from information about the environmental drivers of trait variation, how they interact and how they change with scale. However, for most diverse, natural communities, it is largely unknown whether the relationships between leaf-level traits and interacting environmental drivers (e.g. fire, water availability) are influenced by the scale...

Data from: Illegal tusk harvest and the decline of tusk size in the African elephant

Patrick I. Chiyo, Vincent Obanda & David K. Korir
Harvesting of wild populations can cause the evolution of morphological, behavioral, and life history traits that may compromise natural or sexual selection. Despite the vulnerability of large mammals to rapid population decline from harvesting, the evolutionary effects of harvesting on mega-fauna have received limited attention. In elephants, illegal ivory harvesting disproportionately affects older age classes and males because they carry large tusks, but its' effects on tusk size for age or tusk size for stature...

Data from: Thermodynamic constraints on the utility of ecological stoichiometry for explaining global biogeochemical patterns

Ashley M. Helton, Marcelo Ardon & Emily S. Bernhardt
Carbon and nitrogen cycles are coupled through both stoichiometric requirements for microbial biomass and dissimilatory metabolic processes in which microbes catalyse reduction-oxidation reactions. Here, we integrate stoichiometric theory and thermodynamic principles to explain the commonly observed trade-off between high nitrate and high organic carbon concentrations, and the even stronger trade-off between high nitrate and high ammonium concentrations, across a wide range of aquatic ecosystems. Our results suggest these relationships are the emergent properties of both...

Data from: Canine length in wild male baboons: maturation, aging and social dominance rank

Jordi Galbany, Jenny Tung, Jeanne Altmann & Susan C. Alberts
Canines represent an essential component of the dentition for any heterodont mammal. In primates, like many other mammals, canines are frequently used as weapons. Hence, tooth size and wear may have significant implications for fighting ability, and consequently for social dominance rank, reproductive success, and fitness. We evaluated sources of variance in canine growth and length in a well-studied wild primate population because of the potential importance of canines for male reproductive success in many...

Data from: Genome-wide evidence reveals that African and Eurasian Golden Jackals are distinct species

Klaus-Peter Koepfli, John Pollinger, Raquel Godinho, Jacqueline Robinson, Amanda Lea, Sarah Hendricks, Rena M. Schweizer, Olaf Thalmann, Pedro Silva, Zhenxin Fan, Andrey A. Yurchenko, Pavel Dobrynin, Alexey Makunin, James A. Cahill, Beth Shapiro, Francisco Álvares, José C. Brito, Eli Geffen, Jennifer A. Leonard, Kristofer M. Helgen, Warren E. Johnson, Stephen J. O'Brien, Blaire Van Valkenburgh & Robert K. Wayne
The golden jackal of Africa (Canis aureus) has long been considered a conspecific of jackals distributed throughout Eurasia, with the nearest source populations in the Middle East. However, two recent reports found that mitochondrial haplotypes of some African golden jackals aligned more closely to gray wolves (Canis lupus), which is surprising given the absence of gray wolves in Africa and the phenotypic divergence between the two species. Moreover, these results imply the existence of a...

Data from: Social and environmental impacts of forest management certification in Indonesia

Daniela A. Miteva, Colby J. Loucks & Subhrendu K. Pattanayak
In response to unsustainable timber production in tropical forest concessions, voluntary forest management certification programs such as the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) have been introduced to improve environmental, social, and economic performance over existing management practices. However, despite the proliferation of forest certification over the past two decades, few studies have evaluated its effectiveness. Using temporally and spatially explicit village-level data on environmental and socio-economic indicators in Kalimantan (Indonesia), we evaluate the performance of the...

Data from: Comparative analyses of clinical and environmental populations of Cryptococcus neoformans in Botswana

Yuan Chen, Anastasia P. Litvintseva, Aubrey E. Frazzitta, Miriam R. Haverkamp, Liuyang Wang, Charles Fang, Charles Muthoga, Thomas G. Mitchell & John R. Perfect
Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii (Cng) is the most common cause of fungal meningitis, and its prevalence is highest in sub-Saharan Africa. Patients become infected by inhaling airborne spores or desiccated yeast cells from the environment, where the fungus thrives in avian droppings, trees and soil. To investigate the prevalence and population structure of Cng in southern Africa, we analysed isolates from 77 environmental samples and 64 patients. We detected significant genetic diversity among isolates and...

Data from: The origin and evolution of phototropins

Fay-Wei Li, Kathleen M. Pryer, Gane K.-S. Wong, Carl J. Rothfels, Michael Melkonian, Sarah Mathews, Juan C. Villarreal & Sean W. Graham
Plant phototropism, the ability to bend toward or away from light, is predominantly controlled by blue-light photoreceptors, the phototropins. Although phototropins have been well-characterized in Arabidopsis thaliana, their evolutionary history is largely unknown. In this study, we complete an in-depth survey of phototropin homologs across land plants and algae using newly available transcriptomic and genomic data. We show that phototropins originated in an ancestor of Viridiplantae (land plants + green algae). Phototropins repeatedly underwent independent...

Data from: A framework for detecting natural selection on traits above the species level

Kenneth B. Hoehn, Paul G. Harnik & V. Louise Roth
To what extent can natural selection act on groupings above the species level? Despite extensive theoretical discussion and growing practical concerns over increased rates of global ecological turnover, the question has largely evaded empirical resolution. A flexible and robust hypothesis-testing framework for detecting the phenomenon could facilitate significant progress in resolving this issue. We introduce a permutation-based approach, implemented in the R package perspectev, which provides an explicit test of whether empirical patterns of correlation...

Data from: Paternity analyses in wild-caught and lab-reared Caribbean cricket females reveal the influence of mating environment on post-copulatory sexual selection

Elen Oneal & L. Lacey Knowles
Polyandry is ubiquitous in insects and provides the conditions necessary for male- and female-driven forms of post-copulatory sexual selection to arise. Populations of Amphiacusta sanctaecrucis exhibit significant divergence in portions of the male genitalia that are inserted directly into the female reproductive tract, suggesting that males may exercise some post-copulatory control over fertilization success. We examine the potential for male-male and male-female post-copulatory interactions to influence paternity in wild-caught females of A. sanctaecrucis and contrast...

Data from: Genetic diversity, sexual condition, and microhabitat preference determine mating patterns in Sphagnum (Sphagnaceae) peat-mosses.

Matthew G. Johnson & A. Jonathan Shaw
In bryophytes, the possibility of intragametophytic selfing creates complex mating patterns that are not possible in seed plants, although relatively little is known about patterns of inbreeding in natural populations. In the peat-moss genus Sphagnum, taxa are generally bisexual (gametophytes produce both sperm and egg) or unisexual (gametes produced by separate male and female plants). We sampled populations of 14 species, aiming to assess inbreeding variation and inbreeding depression in sporophytes, and to evaluate correlations...

Data from: The contrasting phylodynamics of human influenza B viruses

Dhanasekaran Vijaykrishna, Edward C. Holmes, Udayan Joseph, Mathieu Fourment, Yvonne C. F. Su, Rebecca Halpin, Raphael T. C. Lee, Yi-Mo Deng, Vithiagaran Gunalan, Xudong Lin, Tim Stockwell, Nadia B. Fedorova, Bin Zhou, Natalie Spirason, Denise K. Kühnert, Veronika Bošková, Tanja Stadler, Anna-Maria Costa, Dominic E. Dwyer, Q. Sue Huang, Lance C. Jennings, William Rawlinson, Sheena G. Sullivan, Aeron C. Hurt, Sebastian Maurer-Stroh … & Raphael TC Lee
A complex interplay of viral, host and ecological factors shape the spatio-temporal incidence and evolution of human influenza viruses. Although considerable attention has been paid to influenza A viruses, a lack of equivalent data means that an integrated evolutionary and epidemiological framework has until now not been available for influenza B viruses, despite their significant disease burden. Through the analysis of over 900 full genomes from an epidemiological collection of more than 26,000 strains from...

Data from: The emergent geography of biophysical dispersal barriers across the Indo-West Pacific

Eric A. Treml, Jason Roberts, Patrick N. Halpin, Hugh P. Possingham & Cynthia Riginos
Aim: To discover and evaluate potential dispersal barriers across the Indo-West Pacific Ocean and to develop spatially explicit hypotheses regarding the location of barriers and their capacity to filter taxa. Additionally, to compare model predictions with previously described barriers and build a more thorough understanding of the region's biogeographic patterns. Location: The reefs of the Indo-West Pacific Ocean, from 100 to 170°E and from 30°N to 30°S. Methods: A biophysical larval dispersal model was used...

Data from: Diversity and evolution of the primate skin microbiome

Sarah E. Council, Amy M. Savage, Julie M. Urban, Megan E. Ehlers, J. H. Pate Skene, Michael L. Platt, Robert R. Dunn & Julie E. Horvath
Skin microbes play a role in human body odour, health and disease. Compared to gut microbes we know comparatively little about the changes in the composition of skin microbes in response to evolutionary changes in hosts, or more recent behavioral and cultural changes in humans. No studies have used sequence-based approaches to consider the skin microbe communities of gorillas and chimpanzees, for example. Comparison of the microbial associates of non-human primates with those of humans...

Data from: Biogeographic consequences of nutrient enrichment for plant-herbivore interactions in coastal wetlands

Qiang He & Brian R. Silliman
A major challenge in ecology is to understand broadscale trends in the impact of environmental change. We provide the first integrative analysis of the effects of eutrophication on plants, herbivores, and their interactions in coastal wetlands across latitudes. We show that fertilisation strongly increases herbivory in salt marshes, but not in mangroves, and that this effect increases with increasing latitude in salt marshes. We further show that stronger nutrient effects on plant nitrogen concentration at...

Data from: Newspaper coverage of maternal health in Bangladesh, Rwanda, and South Africa: a quantitative and qualitative content analysis

Frey Gugsa, Ellora Karmarkar, Andrew Cheyne & Gavin Yamey
Objective: To examine newspaper coverage of maternal health in three countries that have made varying progress towards Millennium Development Goal 5 (MDG 5): Bangladesh (on track), Rwanda (making progress, but not on track) and South Africa (no progress). Design: We analysed each country's leading national English-language newspaper: Bangladesh's The Daily Star, Rwanda's The New Times/The Sunday Times, and South Africa's Sunday Times/The Times. We quantified the number of maternal health articles published from 1 January...

Data from: Genome-wide investigation of adaptation to harmful algal blooms in common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus)

Kristina M. Cammen, Thomas F. Schultz, Patricia E. Rosel, Randall S. Wells & Andrew J. Read
Harmful algal blooms (HABs), which can be lethal in marine species and cause illness in humans, are increasing worldwide. In the Gulf of Mexico, HABs of Karenia brevis produce neurotoxic brevetoxins that cause large-scale marine mortality events. The long history of such blooms, combined with the potentially severe effects of exposure, may have produced a strong selective pressure for evolved resistance. Advances in next-generation sequencing, in particular genotyping-by-sequencing, greatly enable the genomic study of such...

Data from: Hosts of avian brood parasites have evolved egg signatures with elevated information content

Eleanor M. Caves, Martin Stevens, Edwin S. Iversen & Claire N. Spottiswoode
Hosts of brood-parasitic birds must distinguish their own eggs from parasitic mimics, or pay the cost of mistakenly raising a foreign chick. Egg discrimination is easier when different host females of the same species each lay visually distinctive eggs (egg ‘signatures’), which helps to foil mimicry by parasites. Here, we ask whether brood parasitism is associated with lower levels of correlation between different egg traits in hosts, making individual host signatures more distinctive and informative....

Data from: Charting the complete elastic properties of inorganic crystalline compounds

Maarten De Jong, Wei Chen, Thomas Angsten, Anubhav Jain, Randy Notestine, Anthony Gamst, Marcel Sluiter, Chaitanya Krishna Ande, Sybrand Van Der Zwaag, Jose J. Plata, Cormac Toher, Stefano Curtarolo, Gerbrand Ceder, Kristin A. Persson & Mark Asta
The elastic constant tensor of an inorganic compound provides a complete description of the response of the material to external stresses in the elastic limit. It thus provides fundamental insight into the nature of the bonding in the material, and it is known to correlate with many mechanical properties. Despite the importance of the elastic constant tensor, it has been measured for a very small fraction of all known inorganic compounds, a situation that limits...

Data from: Social networks predict gut microbiome composition in wild baboons

Jenny Tung, Luis B. Barriero, Michael B. Burns, J. C. Grenier, Josh Lynch, Laura E Grieneisen, Jeanne Altmann, Susan C Alberts, Ran Blekhman, Elizabeth A Archie & Jean-Christophe Grenier
Social relationships have profound effects on health in humans and other primates, but the mechanisms that explain this relationship are not well understood. Using shotgun metagenomic data from wild baboons, we found that social group membership and social network relationships predicted both the taxonomic structure of the gut microbiome and the structure of genes encoded by gut microbial species. Rates of interaction directly explained variation in the gut microbiome, even after controlling for diet, kinship,...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    53

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    53

Affiliations

  • Duke University
    53
  • University of California, Berkeley
    6
  • Princeton University
    5
  • University of Alberta
    3
  • University of Minnesota
    3
  • Institute of Primate Research
    3
  • Smithsonian Institution
    3
  • Yale University
    3
  • The Bronx Defenders
    2
  • Stanford University
    2