55 Works

Data from: Estimation of energetic condition in wild baboons using fecal thyroid hormone determination

Laurence R. Gesquiere, Mya Pugh, Susan C. Alberts & A. Catherine Markham
Understanding how environmental and social factors affect reproduction through variation in energetic condition remains understudied in wild animals, in large part because accurately and repeatedly measuring energetic condition in the wild is a challenge. Thyroid hormones (THs), such as triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4), have a key role in mitigating metabolic responses to energy intake and expenditure, and therefore are considered important biomarkers of an animal's energetic condition. Recent method development has shown that T3...

Data from: Host associated bacterial community succession during amphibian development

Tiffany L. Prest, Abigail K. Kimball, Jordan G. Kueneman & Valerie J. Mckenzie
Amphibians undergo significant developmental changes during their life cycle, as they typically move from a primarily aquatic environment to a more terrestrial one. Amphibian skin is a mucosal tissue that assembles communities of symbiotic microbiota. However, it is currently not well understood as to where amphibians acquire their skin symbionts, and whether the sources of microbial symbionts change throughout development. In this study, we utilized data collected from four wild boreal toad populations (Anaxyrus boreas);...

Data from: Measuring visual search and distraction in immersive virtual reality

Bettina Olk, Alina Dinu, David J. Zielinski & Regis Kopper
An important issue of psychological research is how experiments conducted in the laboratory or theories based on such experiments relate to human performance in daily life. Immersive virtual reality (VR) allows control over stimuli and conditions at increased ecological validity. The goal of the present study was to accomplish a transfer of traditional paradigms that assess attention and distraction to immersive VR. To further increase ecological validity we explored attentional effects with daily objects as...

Data from: Extremely fast feeding strikes are powered by elastic recoil in a seahorse relative, the snipefish, Macroramphosus scolopax

Sarah J. Longo, Tyler Goodearly & Peter C. Wainwright
Among over 30,000 species of ray-finned fishes, seahorses and pipefishes have a unique feeding mechanism whereby the elastic recoil of tendons allows them to rotate their long snouts extremely rapidly in order to capture small elusive prey. To understand the evolutionary origins of this feeding mechanism, its phylogenetic distribution among closely related lineages must be assessed. We present evidence for elastic recoil powered feeding in the snipefish (Macroramphosus scolopax) from kinematics, dynamics, and morphology. High-speed...

Data from: Deep phenotyping in zebrafish reveals genetic and diet-induced adiposity changes that may inform disease risk

James E.N. Minchin, Catherine M. Scahill, Nicole Staudt, Elisabeth M. Busch-Nentwich & John F. Rawls
The regional distribution of adipose tissues is implicated in a wide range of diseases. For example, proportional increases in visceral adipose tissue increase the risk for insulin resistance, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Zebrafish offer a tractable model system by which to obtain unbiased and quantitative phenotypic information on regional adiposity, and deep phenotyping can explore complex disease-related adiposity traits. To facilitate deep phenotyping of zebrafish adiposity traits, we used pairwise correlations between 67 adiposity traits...

Data from: Chronic exposure of Hawaii Island spinner dolphins (Stenella longirostris) to human activities

Julian A. Tyne, Fredrik Christiansen, Heather L. Heenehan, David W. Johnston & Lars Bejder
Habitat selection is strongly influenced by spatial variations in habitat quality and predation risk. Repeated exposure of wildlife to anthropogenic activities in important habitats may affect habitat selection, leading to negative biological consequences. We quantified the cumulative human exposure of a small, genetically-isolated and behaviourally-constrained spinner dolphin (Stenella longirostris) population, off Hawaii Island, and exposure effects on their daytime cumulative activity budget. Dolphins were exposed to human activities within 100m for 82.7% of the daytime,...

Data from: Responses of aerial insectivorous bats to local and landscape-level features of coffee agroforestry systems in Western Ghats, India

Shasank Ongole, Mahesh Sankaran & Krithi K. Karanth
Shade coffee has shown great promise in providing crucial habitats for biodiversity outside formal protected areas. Insectivorous bats have been understudied in coffee, although they may provide pest control services. We investigated the influence of local and landscape-level features of coffee farms on aerial insectivorous bats in Chikmagalur district in the Western Ghats biodiversity hotspot, India. Bats were monitored in 20 farm sites using ultrasound detectors, and the response of bat species richness and activity...

Data from: Improving rational use of ACTs through diagnosis-dependent subsidies: evidence from a cluster-randomized controlled trial in western Kenya

Wendy Prudhomme O'Meara, Diana Menya, Jeremiah Laktabai, Alyssa Platt, Indrani Saran, Elisa Maffioli, Joseph Kipkoech, Manoj Mohanan, Elizabeth L. Turner & Wendy Prudhomme O’Meara
Background: More than half of artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs) consumed globally are dispensed in the retail sector where diagnostic testing is uncommon, leading to overconsumption and poor targeting. In many malaria-endemic countries, ACTs sold over-the-counter are available at heavily subsidized prices, further contributing to their misuse. Inappropriate use of ACTs can have serious implications for the spread of drug resistance and leads to poor outcomes for non-malaria patients treated with incorrect drugs. We evaluated the...

Data from: Contemporaneous radiations of fungi and plants linked to symbiosis

François Lutzoni, Michael D. Nowak, Michael E. Alfaro, Valérie Reeb, Jolanta Miadlikowska, Michael Krug, A. Elizabeth Arnold, Louise A. Lewis, David L. Swofford, David Hibbett, Khidir Hilu, Timothy Y. James, Dietmar Quandt & Susana Magallón
Interactions between fungi and plants, including parasitism, mutualism, and saprotrophy, have been invoked as key to their respective macroevolutionary success. Here we evaluate the origins of plant-fungal symbioses and saprotrophy using a time-calibrated phylogenetic framework that reveals linked and drastic shifts in diversification rates of each kingdom. Fungal colonization of land was associated with at least two origins of terrestrial green algae and preceded embryophytes (as evidenced by losses of fungal flagellum, ca. 720 Ma),...

Data from: Gene signature of the human pancreatic ε-cell

Giselle Dominguez Gutierrez, Jinrang Kim, Ann-Hwee Lee, Jenny Tong, JingJing Niu, Sarah Gray, Yi Wei, Yueming Ding, Min Ni, Christina Adler, Andrew J. Murphy, Jesper Gromada, Yurong Xin & Sarah M Gray
The ghrelin producing ε-cell represents the fifth endocrine cell type in human pancreatic islets. The abundance of ε-cells in adult pancreas is extremely low, which has hampered the investigation on the molecular pathways regulating the development and the function of this cell type. In this study, we explored the molecular features defining the function of pancreatic ε-cells isolated from adult non-diabetic donors using single-cell RNA sequencing technology. We focus on transcription factors, cell surface receptors...

Data from: Dissecting the role of a large chromosomal inversion in life history divergence throughout the Mimulus guttatus species complex

Jennifer M. Coughlan & John H. Willis
Chromosomal inversions can play an important role in adaptation, but the mechanism of their action in many natural populations remains unclear. An inversion could suppress recombination between locally beneficial alleles, thereby preventing maladaptive reshuffling with less-fit, migrant alleles. The recombination suppression hypothesis has gained much theoretical support but empirical tests are lacking. Here, we evaluated the evolutionary history and phenotypic effects of a chromosomal inversion which differentiates annual and perennial forms of Mimulus guttatus. We...

Data from: Genetic architecture of quantitative flower and leaf traits in a pair of sympatric sister species of Primulina

Chen Feng, Chao Feng, Lihua Yang, Ming Kang & Mark D. Rausher
Flowers and leaves each represent suites of functionally interrelated traits that are often involved in species divergence and local adaptation. However, a major unresolved issue is how the individual component traits that make up a complex trait such as a flower evolve in a coordinated fashion to retain a high degree of functionality. We use a quantitative trait loci (QTL) approach to elucidate the genetic architecture of divergence in flower and leaf traits between sister...

Data from: Plasticity of plant defense and its evolutionary implications in wild populations of Boechera stricta

Maggie R. Wagner & Thomas Mitchell-Olds
Phenotypic plasticity is thought to impact evolutionary trajectories by shifting trait values in a direction that is either favored by natural selection (“adaptive plasticity”) or disfavored (“nonadaptive” plasticity). However, it is unclear how commonly each of these types of plasticity occurs in natural populations. To answer this question, we measured glucosinolate defensive chemistry and reproductive fitness in over 1,500 individuals of the wild perennial mustard Boechera stricta, planted in four common gardens across central Idaho,...

Data from: Estimating infection prevalence: best practices and their theoretical underpinnings

Ian F. Miller, India Schneider-Crease, Charles L. Nunn & Michael P. Muehlenbein
Accurately estimating infection prevalence is fundamental to the study of population health, disease dynamics, and infection risk factors. Prevalence is estimated as the proportion of infected individuals (“individual-based estimation”), but is also estimated as the proportion of samples from which the disease-causing organisms are recovered (“anonymous estimation”). The latter method is often used when researchers lack information on individual host identity, which can occur during noninvasive sampling of wild populations or when the individual that...

Data from: Spatial heterogeneity in species composition constrains plant community responses to herbivory and fertilization

Dorothee Hodapp, Elizabeth T. Borer, W. Stanley Harpole, Eric M. Lind, Eric W. Seabloom, Peter B. Adler, Juan Alberti, Carlos A. Arnillas, Jonathan D. Bakker, Lori Biederman, Marc Cadotte, Elsa E. Cleland, Scott Collins, Philip A. Fay, Jennifer Firn, Nicole Hagenah, Yann Hautier, Oscar Iribarne, Johannes M.H. Knops, Rebecca L. McCulley, Andrew MacDougall, Joslin L. Moore, John W. Morgan, Brent Mortensen, Kimberly J. La Pierre … & Johannes M. H. Knops
Environmental change can result in substantial shifts in community composition. The associated immigration and extinction events are likely constrained by the spatial distribution of species. Still, studies on environmental change typically quantify biotic responses at single spatial (time series within a single plot) or temporal (spatial beta-diversity at single time points) scales, ignoring their potential interdependence. Here, we use data from a global network of grassland experiments to determine how turnover responses to two major...

Data from: Assessing cetacean surveys throughout the Mediterranean Sea: a gap analysis in environmental space

Laura Mannocci, Jason J. Roberts, Patrick N. Halpin, Matthieu Authier, Olivier Boisseau, Mohamed Nejmeddine Bradai, Ana Cañadas, Carla Chicote, Léa David, Nathalie Di-Méglio, Caterina M. Fortuna, Alexandros Frantzis, Manel Gazo, Tilen Genov, Philip S. Hammond, Drasko Holcer, Kristin Kaschner, Dani Kerem, Giancarlo Lauriano, Tim Lewis, Giuseppe Notarbartolo Di Sciara, Simone Panigada, Juan Antonio Raga, Aviad Scheinin, Vincent Ridoux … & Joseph Vella
Heterogeneous data collection in the marine environment has led to large gaps in our knowledge of marine species distributions. To fill these gaps, models calibrated on existing data may be used to predict species distributions in unsampled areas, given that available data are sufficiently representative. Our objective was to evaluate the feasibility of mapping cetacean densities across the entire Mediterranean Sea using models calibrated on available survey data and various environmental covariates. We aggregated 302,481...

Data from: Exposure to predators does not lead to the evolution of larger brains in experimental populations of threespine stickleback

Kieran Samuk, Jan Xue, Diana Jessie Rennison & Diana J. Rennision
Natural selection is often invoked to explain differences in brain size among vertebrates. However, the particular agents of selection that shape brain size variation remain obscure. Recent studies suggest that predators may select for larger brains because increased cognitive and sensory abilities allow prey to better elude predators. Yet, there is little direct evidence that exposure to predators causes the evolution of larger brains in prey species. We experimentally tested this prediction by exposing families...

Data from: A test of the eavesdropping avoidance hypothesis as an explanation for the structure of low amplitude aggressive signals in the song sparrow

Joseph M. Niederhauser, Adrienne L. DuBois, William A. Searcy, Stephen Nowicki & Rindy C. Anderson
Low amplitude signals function in private exchanges of information between signalers and nearby receivers. The eavesdropping avoidance hypothesis proposes that selection favors quiet threat signals in order to avoid the costs of eavesdroppers. If true, then selection should favor other acoustic traits in addition to low amplitude that lead to quiet signals transmitting less effectively through the environment compared to broadcast signals. The “warbled” soft songs of male song sparrows differ from “crystallized” soft songs...

Data from: The role of diversification in the continental scale community assembly of the American oaks (Quercus)

Jeannine Cavender-Bares, Shan Kothari, José Eduardo Meireles, Matthew A. Kaproth, Paul S. Manos & Andrew L. Hipp
Premise of the study: Evolutionary and biogeographic history, including past environmental change and diversification processes, are likely to have influenced the expansion, migration, and extinction of populations, creating evolutionary legacy effects that influence regional species pools and the composition of communities. We consider the consequences of the diversification process in shaping trait evolution and assembly of oak-dominated communities throughout the continental U.S. Methods: Within the US oaks, we tested for phylogenetic and functional trait patterns...

Data from: Genomic signatures of population bottleneck and recovery in Northwest Atlantic pinnipeds

Kristina M. Cammen, Thomas F. Schultz, W. Don Bowen, Michael O. Hammill, Wendy B. Puryear, Jonathan Runstadler, Frederick W. Wenzel, Stephanie A. Wood & Michael Kinnison
Population increases over the past several decades provide natural settings in which to study the evolutionary processes that occur during bottleneck, growth, and spatial expansion. We used parallel natural experiments of historical decline and subsequent recovery in two sympatric pinniped species in the Northwest Atlantic, the gray seal (Halichoerus grypus atlantica) and harbor seal (Phoca vitulina vitulina), to study the impact of recent demographic change in genomic diversity. Using restriction site‐associated DNA sequencing, we assessed...

Data from: Mutual visual signalling between the cleaner shrimp Ancylomenes pedersoni and its client fish

Eleanor M. Caves, Patrick A. Green & Sonke Johnsen
Cleaner shrimp and their reef fish clients are an interspecific mutualistic interaction that is thought to be mediated by signals, and a useful system for studying the dynamics of interspecific signalling. To demonstrate signalling, one must show that purported signals at minimum (a) result in a consistent state change in the receiver and (b) contain reliable information about the sender’s intrinsic state or future behaviour. Additionally, signals must be perceptible by receivers. Here, we document...

Data from: CHIIMP: an automated high-throughput microsatellite genotyping approach reveals greater allelic diversity in wild chimpanzees

Hannah J. Barbian, Andrew Jesse Connell, Alexa N. Avitto, Ronnie M. Russell, Andrew G. Smith, Madhurima S. Gundlapally, Alexander L. Shazad, Yingying Li, Frederic Bibollet-Ruche, Emily E. Wroblewski, Deus Mjungu, Elizabeth V. Lonsdorf, Fiona A. Stewart, Alexander K. Piel, Anne E. Pusey, Paul M. Sharp & Beatrice H. Hahn
Short tandem repeats (STRs), also known as microsatellites, are commonly used to non-invasively genotype wild-living endangered species, including African apes. Until recently, capillary electrophoresis has been the method of choice to determine the length of polymorphic STR loci. However, this technique is labor intensive, difficult to compare across platforms, and notoriously imprecise. Here we developed a MiSeq-based approach and tested its performance using previously genotyped fecal samples from long-term studied chimpanzees in Gombe National Park,...

Data from: Near absence of differential gene expression in the retina of rainbow trout after exposure to a magnetic pulse: implications for magnetoreception

Robert R. Fitak, Lorian E. Schweikert, Benjamin R. Wheeler, David A. Ernst, Kenneth J. Lohmann & Sonke Johnsen
The ability to perceive Earth’s magnetic field, or magnetoreception, exists in numerous animals. Although the mechanism underlying magnetoreception has not been clearly established in any species, in salmonid fish it is hypothesized to occur by means of crystals of magnetite associated with nervous tissue such as the brain, olfactory organ, or retina. In this study, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were exposed to a brief magnetic pulse known to disrupt magnetic orientation behavior in several animals....

Data from: Don’t throw out the sympatric speciation with the crater lake water: fine-scale investigation of introgression provides equivocal support for causal role of secondary gene flow in one of the clearest examples of sympatric speciation

Emilie J. Richards, Jelmer W. Poelstra & Christopher H. Martin
Genomic data has revealed complex histories of colonization and repeated gene flow previously unrecognized in some of the most celebrated examples of sympatric speciation and radiation. However, much of the evidence for secondary gene flow into these radiations comes from summary statistics calculated from sparse genomic sampling without knowledge of which specific genomic regions introgressed. This tells us little about how gene flow potentially influenced sympatric diversification. Here we investigated whole genomes of Barombi Mbo...

Data from: Seed traits, not density or distance from parent, determine seed predation and establishment in an Afrotropical forest

Cooper Rosin & John R. Poulsen
Seed predators drive patterns in seed mortality and seedling establishment and are posited to contribute to the maintenance of plant species diversity through several mechanisms. Negative density dependence and spatially-restricted recruitment are apparently widespread in Neotropical forests, but are little studied in Afrotropical forests, where generalist vertebrates may contribute more to seed mortality than do specialized invertebrates and fungi. We experimentally assessed the roles of seed density and distance from the parent tree for ten...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    55

Resource Types

  • Dataset
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  • Text
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Affiliations

  • Duke University
    55
  • Princeton University
    4
  • University of North Carolina
    4
  • University of British Columbia
    4
  • University of Pennsylvania
    3
  • University of Washington
    3
  • University of Pretoria
    3
  • Field Museum of Natural History
    3
  • University of Minnesota
    3
  • University of California, Davis
    3