6 Works

Data from: Using a forest dynamics model to link community assembly processes and traits structure

Mickaël Chauvet, Georges Kunstler, Jacques Roy & Xavier Morin
1. Trait-based approaches have been increasingly used to understand the role of environmental and biotic filters on species assembly. However, our understanding of the relationships between traits and community assembly processes remain limited. Indeed, various assembly processes may lead to similar functional patterns, and the effects of a given process may vary with the considered traits. Especially, competition can result in trait divergence or convergence depending on whether the trait is related to niche differences...

Data from: Darwinian sex roles confirmed across the animal kingdom

Tim Janicke, Ines K. Häderer, Marc J. Lajeunesse & Nils Anthes
Since Darwin’s conception of sexual selection theory, scientists have struggled to identify the evolutionary forces underlying the pervasive differences between male and female behavior, morphology, and physiology. The Darwin-Bateman paradigm predicts that anisogamy imposes stronger sexual selection on males, which, in turn, drives the evolution of conventional sex roles in terms of female-biased parental care and male-biased sexual dimorphism. Although this paradigm forms the cornerstone of modern sexual selection theory, it still remains untested across...

Data from: The ontogeny of tolerance curves: habitat quality vs. acclimation in a stressful environment

Odrade Nougué, Nils Svendsen, Roula Jabbour-Zahab, Thomas Lenormand & Luis-Miguel Chevin
Stressful environments affect life-history components of fitness through (i) instantaneous detrimental effects, (ii) historical (carry-over) effects and (iii) history-by-environment interactions, including acclimation effects. The relative contributions of these different responses to environmental stress are likely to change along life, but such ontogenic perspective is often overlooked in studies of tolerance curves, precluding a better understanding of the causes of costs of acclimation, and more generally of fitness in temporally fine-grained environments. We performed an experiment...

Data from: Seabird diversity hotspot linked to ocean productivity in the Canary Current Large Marine Ecosystem

W. James Grecian, Matthew J. Witt, Martin J. Attrill, Stuart Bearhop, Peter H. Becker, Carsten Egevang, Robert W. Furness, Brendan J. Godley, Jacob González-Solís, David Grémillet, Matthias Kopp, Amélie Lescroël, Jason Matthiopoulos, Samantha C. Patrick, Hans-Ulrich Peter, Richard A. Phillips, Iain J. Stenhouse & Stephen C. Votier
Upwelling regions are highly productive habitats targeted by wide-ranging marine predators and industrial fisheries. In this study, we track the migratory movements of eight seabird species from across the Atlantic; quantify overlap with the Canary Current Large Marine Ecosystem (CCLME) and determine the habitat characteristics that drive this association. Our results indicate the CCLME is a biodiversity hotspot for migratory seabirds; all tracked species and more than 70% of individuals used this upwelling region. Relative...

Data from: Evidence of reduced individual heterogeneity in adult survival of long-lived species

Guillaume Peron, Jean-Michel Gaillard, Christophe Barbraud, Christophe Bonenfant, Anne Charmantier, Rémi Choquet, Tim Coulson, Vladimir Grosbois, Anne Loison, GIlbert Marzolin, Norman Owen-Smtih, Déborah Pardo, Floriane Plard, Roger Pradel, Carole Toïgo, Olivier Gimenez & Norman Owen-Smith
The canalization hypothesis postulates that the rate at which trait variation generates variation in the average individual fitness in a population determines how buffered traits are against environmental and genetic factors. The ranking of a species on the slow-fast continuum – the covariation among life-history traits describing species-specific life cycles along a gradient going from a long life, slow maturity, and low annual reproductive output, to a short life, fast maturity, and high annual reproductive...

Data from: How the truffle got its mate: insights from genetic structure in spontaneous and planted Mediterranean populations of Tuber melanosporum

Elisa Taschen, François Rousset, Mathieu Sauve, Laure Benoit, Marie-Pierre Dubois, Franck Richard, Marc-André Selosse, M.-P. Dubois & M.-A. Selosse
The life cycles and dispersal of edible fungi are still poorly known, thus limiting our understanding of their evolution and domestication. The prized Tuber melanosporum produces fruitbodies (fleshy organs where meiospores mature) gathered in natural, spontaneously inoculated forests or harvested in plantations of nursery-inoculated trees. Yet, how fruitbodies are formed remains unclear, thus limiting yields, and how current domestication attempts affect population genetic structure is overlooked. Fruitbodies result from mating between two haploid individuals: the...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    6

Affiliations

  • Université Paul-Valéry Montpellier
    6
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    4
  • Biodiversity Research Institute
    1
  • University of Glasgow
    1
  • British Antarctic Survey
    1
  • University of Barcelona
    1
  • Office National de la Chasse et de la Faune Sauvage
    1
  • Natural Environment Research Council
    1
  • Sorbonne University
    1
  • Institute of Avian Research
    1