241 Works

Eroding Trust: The UK’s Prevent Counter-Extremism Strategy in Health and Education

Amrit Singh
Eroding Trust: The UK’s Prevent Counter-Extremism Strategy in Health and Education is the most comprehensive independent assessment to date of the workings of the UK government’s Prevent counter-extremism strategy. Established to “stop people becoming terrorists or supporting terrorism,” Prevent has imposed since 2015 a statutory duty on health and education bodies to have “due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism.” The report concludes that the strategy creates a serious...

Criminalizing Condoms: How Policing Practices Put Sex Workers and HIV Services at Risk in Kenya, Namibia, Russia, South Africa, the United States, and Zimbabwe

Acacia Shields
How Policing Practices Put Sex Workers and HIV Services at Risk in Kenya, Namibia, Russia, South Africa, the United States, and Zimbabwe In countries around the world, police are actively engaged in stopping and searching sex workers and confiscating or destroying condoms found in their possession. In many cases, possession of condoms has been used by prosecutors as evidence of prostitution. This treatment of condoms as contraband forces sex workers to make a choice between...

Caspian Oil Windfalls: Who Will Benefit?

Svetlana Tsalik & Joseph E. Stiglitz
Caspian Oil Windfalls: Who Will Benefit?, a publication from the Central Eurasia Project's Caspian Revenue Watch, calls for greater accountability, transparency, and public oversight in the oil and natural gas industries of Azerbaijan and Kazakhstan. It urges foreign oil companies, their home governments, and international financial institutions to promote good governance and democracy in both countries to ensure that petroleum revenues generate social prosperity and stable governments. Written by Svetlana Tsalik, director of the Caspian...

Drugs and the Death Penalty

Patrick Gallahue
As member states of the United Nations take stock of the drug control system, a number of debates have emerged among governments about how to balance international drug laws with human rights, public health, alternatives to incarceration, and experimentation with regulation. This series intends to provide a primer on why governments must not turn a blind eye to pressing human rights and public health impacts of current drug policies. There are currently thousands of people...

Corporate War Crimes: Prosecuting the Pillage of Natural Resources

James G. Stewart
Pillage means theft during war. Although the prohibition against pillage dates to the Roman Empire, pillaging is a modern war crime that can be enforced before international and domestic criminal courts. Following World War II, several businessmen were convicted for commercial pillage of natural resources. And although pillage has been prosecuted in recent years, commercial actors are seldom held accountable for their role in fueling conflict. Reviving corporate liability for pillaging natural resources is not...

Aspirations and Reality: British Muslims and the Labour Market

Zamila Bunglawala
British Muslims face severe obstacles in the United Kingdom's labor market and have a disproportionately high rate of unemployment, according to this report from OSI's EU Monitoring and Advocacy Program (EUMAP). Aspirations and Reality: British Muslims and the Labour Market calls for more effort to meet the employment aspirations and needs of Muslims in the UK, especially Muslim women and young Muslims. "Government, the private sector, and Muslims themselves must ensure that British Muslims are...

Kenya: Justice Sector and the Rule of Law

Patricia Kameri Mbote & Migai Akech
The premise of this report is based on Kenya's policy blueprint, Vision 2030, which places rule of law at the center of its goals. It was commenced at the same time as the nation was recuperating from the post-election poll, which resulted in many Kenyans expressing disappointment at the nation's democratic institutions. The study, produced by AfriMAP and the Open Society Initiative for Eastern Africa, examines and makes recommendations for the following topics: justice sector...

Judging a Dictator: The Trial of Guatemala’s Rios Montt

Emi MacLean
Efrain Rios Montt, the former military ruler of Guatemala, was convicted on May 10, 2013, of genocide and crimes against humanity by a court in Guatemala City. Three days later the conviction was overthrown by the country's constitutional court on procedural grounds. This book documents this attempt to provide local justice for mass crimes, by providing a summary of the six week trial, based on the daily reports on the www.riosmontt-trial.org website, together with an...

Is Italian Agriculture “Pull Factor” for Irregular Migration—And, If So, Why?

Alessandra Corrado
In discussions on irregular migration in Europe, undeclared work is generally viewed as a “pull factor”—positive aspects of a destination-country that attract an individual or group to leave their home—for both employers as well as prospective migrants, and especially in sectors such as agriculture. A closer examination of the agricultural model, however, reveals that structural forces are driving demand for work and incentivizing exploitation. This is particularly evident in Southern Italy, a region famous for...

Improving Pretrial Justice: The Roles of Lawyers and Paralegals

Ed Cape
On any particular day, around three million people are being held in pretrial detention, and during the course of a year an estimated 10 million people pass through pretrial detention. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the positive impact that early intervention by lawyers and paralegals can have on pretrial justice generally—and on the use of pretrial detention in particular—and to provide a guide to the ways in which lawyer and paralegal schemes...

HIV/AIDS Policy in Senegal: A Civil Society Perspective

Daouda Diouf
Senegal serves as a model among African countries in its control of HIV/AIDS. The national HIV prevalence rate has been below 1 percent for the past two decades, a success that can be attributed to the country’s timely response to the epidemic. The National AIDS Council has adopted several measures to prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS such as promoting condom use, instituting a sentinel surveillance system, and increasing the number of voluntary counseling and testing...

Harm Reduction

Joanne Csete & Daniel Wolfe
As member states of the United Nations take stock of the drug control system, a number of debates have emerged among governments about how to balance international drug laws with human rights, public health, alternatives to incarceration, and experimentation with regulation. This series intends to provide a primer on why governments must not turn a blind eye to pressing human rights and public health impacts of current drug policies. Harm reduction is based on the...

Fair and Effective Police Stops

Joel Miller
Around the world, police departments, policy makers, and communities have struggled to develop best practices that ensure the delivery of both fair and effective policing. Recently, five police departments in Spain undertook an ambitious reform program intended to reduce ethnic profiling and increase the effectiveness and fairness of police stops and searches. Their collective experience shows that change is possible—while also illustrating the challenges and resources required to make change sustainable. Through a series of...

From Judgment to Justice: Implementing International and Regional Human Rights Decisions

David C. Baluarte & Christian M. De Vos
Despite unquestionable achievements over the past 25 years, the Inter-American, European, African, and UN systems all face tremendous obstacles in translating their verdicts into change on the ground. In many cases, landmark decisions have not yielded meaningful reform. This report by the Open Society Justice Initiative reviews the implementation of judgments across the world’s four human rights systems. Working from empirical data as well as interviews conducted with court personnel, human rights advocates, and academics,...

Forced Sterilization of Women in Uzbekistan

Natalia Antelava
Forced Sterilization of Women in Uzbekistan examines an alleged government sterilization program and reveals a pattern of ongoing, systematic forced sterilizations that have affected tens of thousands of women and have intensified in recent years. The report’s testimonial evidence indicates that for the past 13 years the Uzbek government has carried out a sterilization program that is a centrally regulated policy with the apparent aim of controlling population growth. The report’s main conclusions include: In...

From Novelty to Normalcy: Polling in Myanmar’s Democratic Transition

Kathleen A. Frankovic, Mahar Mangahas & Ibrahim Suffian
Since the government of Myanmar* announced a transition from military rule to democracy in 2010, both domestic and international stakeholders have turned to polling to discover public opinion on a range of issues. This report examines the state of opinion research in Myanmar, identifies challenges, and makes recommendations for improvements. Although Myanmar has a decades-long history of market surveys, political polling is a relatively new phenomenon. Organizations operating in this field face four major challenges....

Armed Drones in Europe

Srdjan Cvijic, Lisa Klingenberg, Delina Goxho & Ella Knight
The use of armed drones in the European Union has become a topic rife with controversy and misinformation. This report gives a comprehensive and in-depth overview of the approach to, and use of, armed drones in five European countries: Germany, the Netherlands, Italy, France, and the United Kingdom. Further, the report is intended to start a wider debate about armed drones in Europe and to serve as a guide on this topic for the European...

Born in the Americas: The Promise and Practice of Nationality Laws in Brazil, Chile, and Colombia

Juliana Vengoechea Barrios
Like most countries in the Americas, Brazil, Chile, and Colombia practice jus soli citizenship, in which nationality is generally granted to those born in the country’s territory. In theory, this is the simplest and most straightforward form of citizenship, and the most likely to prevent statelessness. But in practice, many people in Brazil, Chile, and Colombia struggle to obtain proof of citizenship and fully enjoy their citizenship rights, and some are left stateless. Born in...

Are Agri-Food Workers Only Exploited in Southern Europe? Case Studies on Migrant Labor in Germany, Netherlands, and Sweden

Jan Schneider, Malte Götte, Karin Astrid Siegmann, Tyler Williams, Andrea Iossa, Niklas Selberg, Letizia Palumbo & Alessandra Corrado
In recent years, several studies have reported on the exploitation endured by migrant workers in Southern European Union member states—especially in sectors such as agriculture and food production. However, there has been much less focus on the North. New research now shows that agri-food workers in Northern Europe also face poor and even abusive conditions. In this light, Are Agri-Food Workers Only Exploited in Southern Europe? focuses on production in Germany, Netherlands, and Sweden. These...

Mapping Digital Media: News and New Media in Central Africa—Challenges and Opportunities

Marie-Soleil Frère
The Mapping Digital Media project examines the global opportunities and risks created by the transition from traditional to digital media. Covering 60 countries, the project examines how these changes affect the core democratic service that any media system should provide: news about political, economic, and social affairs. The Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) is the largest country in sub-Saharan Africa. Rwanda and Burundi are among the continent’s smallest states. More than just neighbors, these...

Mapping Digital Media: Netherlands

Martijn de Waal, Andra Leurdijk, Levien Nordeman & Thomas Poell
The Mapping Digital Media project examines the global opportunities and risks created by the transition from traditional to digital media. Covering 60 countries, the project examines how these changes affect the core democratic service that any media system should provide: news about political, economic, and social affairs. This is an exciting and difficult time for independent journalism and civil society in the Netherlands. Thanks to unprecedented opportunities for new ways of doing journalism, connecting to...

Mapping Digital Media: Macedonia

Roberto Belicanec & Zoran Ricliev
The Mapping Digital Media project examines the global opportunities and risks created by the transition from traditional to digital media. Covering 60 countries, the project examines how these changes affect the core democratic service that any media system should provide: news about political, economic, and social affairs. The media in Macedonia have been at the center of acute political instability in recent years, affecting the country’s path toward digitization in many ways. With regard to...

Mapping Digital Media: Slovakia

Miroslav Kollar & Tomáš Czwitkowics
The Mapping Digital Media project examines the global opportunities and risks created by the transition from traditional to digital media. Covering 60 countries, the project examines how these changes affect the core democratic service that any media system should provide: news about political, economic, and social affairs. There have been waves of change in the provision of news and information services in Slovakia in recent years. Digitization has been variously implicated as a cause, catalyst,...

Mapping Digital Media: Peru

Ursula Freundt-Thurne, CÉSAR PITA & María José Ampuero
The Mapping Digital Media project examines the global opportunities and risks created by the transition from traditional to digital media. Covering 60 countries, the project examines how these changes affect the core democratic service that any media system should provide: news about political, economic, and social affairs. The process of digitization is still in its early stages in Peru, where the transition to digital terrestrial television (DTT) will not be finalized until 2024 and the...

Mapping Digital Media: On-Demand Services and Media Diversity

Laure Kaltenbach & Alexandre Joux
The Mapping Digital Media project examines the global opportunities and risks created by the transition from traditional to digital media. Covering 60 countries, the project examines how these changes affect the core democratic service that any media system should provide: news about political, economic, and social affairs. On-demand services give access by internet (or cable) to video, audio, and other content. A vast range of on-demand media products is now available. Media corporations no longer...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    241

Resource Types

  • Report
    241

Affiliations

  • Open Society Foundations
    241
  • Carleton University
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  • University of Calgary
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  • York University
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