4 Works

Data from: It’s not all black and white: investigating colour polymorphism in manta rays across Indo-Pacific populations

Stephanie Venables, Andrea Marshall, Elitza Germanov, Robert Perryman, Ricardo Tapilatu, I. Gede Hendrawan, Anna Flam, Mike Van Keulen, Joseph Tomkins & Jason Kennington
Intraspecific colour polymorphisms have been the focus of numerous studies, yet processes affecting melanism in the marine environment remain poorly understood. Arguably the most prominent example of melanism in marine species occurs in manta rays (Mobula birostris and M. alfredi). Here, we use photo identification catalogues to document the frequency variation of melanism across Indo-Pacific manta ray populations and test for evidence of selection by predation acting on colour morph variants. We use mark-recapture modeling...

Data from: Adaptive variation for growth and resistance to a novel pathogen along climatic gradients in a foundation tree

Collin W. Ahrens, Richard A. Mazanec, Trudy Paap, Katinka X. Ruthrof, Anthea Challis, Giles Hardy, Margaret Byrne, David T. Tissue & Paul D. Rymer
Natural ecosystems are under pressure from increasing abiotic and biotic stressors, including climate change and novel pathogens, which are putting species at risk of local extinction, and altering community structure, composition, and function. Here, we aim to assess adaptive variation in growth and fungal disease resistance within a foundation tree, Corymbia calophylla to determine local adaptation, trait heritability, and genetic constraints in adapting to future environments. Two experimental planting sites were established in regions of...

Plant functional traits differ in adaptability and are predicted to be differentially affected by climate change

Collin Ahrens, Margaret Andrew, Richard Mazanec, Katinka Ruthrof, Anthea Challis, Giles Hardy, Margaret Byrne, David T. Tissue & Paul Rymer
1. Climate change is testing the resilience of forests worldwide pushing physiological tolerance to climatic extremes. Plant functional traits have been shown to be adapted to climate, and have evolved patterns of trait correlations (similar patterns of distribution) and coordinations (mechanistic trade-off). We predicted that traits would differentiate between populations associated with climatic gradients, suggestive of adaptive variation, and correlated traits would adapt to future climate scenarios in similar ways. 2. We measured genetically determined...

Data from: Estimating body mass of free-living whales using aerial photogrammetry and 3D volumetrics

Fredrik Christiansen, Mariano Sironi, Michael J. Moore, Matías Di Martino, Marcos Ricciardi, Hunter A. Warick, Duncan J. Irschick, Robert Gutierrez & Marcela M. Uhart
1. Body mass is a key life history trait in animals. Despite being the largest animals on the planet, no method currently exists to estimate body mass of free-living whales. 2. We combined aerial photographs and historical catch records to estimate the body mass of free-living right whales (Eubalaena sp.). First, aerial photogrammetry from unmanned aerial vehicles was used to measure the body length, width (lateral distance) and height (dorso-ventral distance) of free-living southern right...

Registration Year

  • 2019
    4

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    4

Affiliations

  • Murdoch University
    4
  • Western Sydney University
    2
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst
    1
  • Marine Megafauna Foundation
    1
  • Macquarie University
    1
  • Institut des Hautes Etudes de Tunis
    1
  • Department of Agriculture and Food Western Australia
    1
  • Udayana University
    1
  • Instituto de Biotecnología de León
    1
  • Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
    1