40 Works

Data from: Repeatability of locomotor performance and of morphology - locomotor performance relationships

Cara Conradsen, Jeffrey A Walker, Catherine Perna & Katrina McGuigan
There is good evidence that natural selection drives the evolution of locomotor performance, but the processes that generate among individual variation in locomotion, the substrate upon which selection acts, are relatively poorly understood. We measured prolonged swimming performance, Ucrit, and morphology in a large cohort (n=461) of wildtype zebrafish, Danio rerio, at ∼6 months and again at ∼9 months. Using mixed model analyses to estimate repeatability as the intraclass correlation coefficient, we determined that Ucrit...

Data from: Anthropogenic debris ingestion by avifauna in eastern Australia

Lauren Roman, Qamar A. Schuyler, Britta Denise Hardesty & Kathy A. Townsend
Anthropogenic debris in the world’s oceans and coastal environments is a pervasive global issue that has both direct and indirect impacts on avifauna. The number of bird species affected, the feeding ecologies associated with an increased risk of debris ingestion, and selectivity of ingested debris have yet to be investigated in most of Australia’s coastal and marine birds. With this study we aim to address the paucity of data regarding marine debris ingestion in Australian...

Data from: Accounting for uncertainty in dormant life stages in stochastic demographic models

Maria Paniw, Pedro F. Quintana-Ascencio, Fernando Ojeda & Roberto Salguero-Gómez
Dormant life stages are often critical for population viability in stochastic environments, but accurate field data characterizing them are difficult to collect. Such limitations may translate into uncertainties in demographic parameters describing these stages, which then may propagate errors in the examination of population-level responses to environmental variation. Expanding on current methods, we 1) apply data-driven approaches to estimate parameter uncertainty in vital rates of dormant life stages and 2) test whether such estimates provide...

Data from: Curvilinear telomere length dynamics in a squamate reptile

Beata Ujvari, Peter A. Biro, Jordan E. Charters, Gregory Brown, Kim Heasman, Christa Beckman, Thomas Madsen & Christa Beckmann
The lack of consensus concerning the impact of telomere length (TL) dynamics on survival emphasizes the need for additional studies to evaluate the effect of TL on key life-history processes. Using both cross-sectional and longitudinal data, we therefore explored age-specific TL dynamics in a squamate reptile: the frillneck lizard (Chlamydosaurus kingii). Our cross-sectional analyses revealed that young lizards had short TL, TL increased in medium-aged lizards, but TL decreased in older age cohorts, revealing a...

Data from: Revisiting the measurement of anomie

Ali Teymoori, Jolanda Jetten, Brock Bastian, Amarina Ariyanto, Frédérique Autin, Nadia Ayub, Constantina Badea, Tomasz Besta, Fabrizio Butera, Rui Costa-Lopes, Lijuan Cui, Carole Fantini, Gillian Finchilesc, Lowell Gaertner, Mario Gollwitzer, Ángel Gómez, Roberto González, Ying Yi Hong, Dorthe Høj Jensen, Minoru Karasawa, Thomas Kessler, Olivier Klein, Marcus Lima, Tuuli Anna Mähönen, Laura Megevand … & Gillian Finchilescu
Sociologists coined the term "anomie" to describe societies that are characterized by disintegration and deregulation. Extending beyond conceptualizations of anomie that conflate the measurements of anomie as 'a state of society' and as a 'state of mind', we disentangle these conceptualizations and develop an analysis and measure of this phenomenon focusing on anomie as a perception of the 'state of society'. We propose that anomie encompasses two dimensions: a perceived breakdown in social fabric (i.e.,...

Data from: Higher-order interactions capture unexplained complexity in diverse communities

Margaret Mayfield & Daniel Stouffer
Natural communities are well known to be maintained by many complex processes. Despite this, the practical aspects of studying them often require some simplification, such as the widespread assumption that direct, additive competition captures the important details about how interactions between species impact community diversity. On the other hand, more complex non-additive ‘higher-order’ interactions, are assumed to be negligible or absent. Notably, these assumptions are poorly supported and have major consequences for the accuracy with...

Data from: Predation can select for later and more synchronous arrival times in migrating species

Anna M. F. Harts, Nadiah P. Kristensen & Hanna Kokko
For migratory species, the timing of arrival at breeding grounds is an important determinant of fitness. Too early arrival at the breeding ground is associated with various costs, and we focus on one understudied cost: that migrants can experience a higher risk of predation if arriving earlier than the bulk of the breeding population. We show, using both a semi-analytic and simulation model, that predation can select for later arrival. This is because of safety...

Data from: The hitchhiker's guide to Europe: the infection dynamics of an ongoing Wolbachia invasion and mitochondrial selective sweep in Rhagoletis cerasi

Hannes Schuler, Kirsten Koeppler, Sabine Daxböck-Horvath, Bilal Rasool, Susanne Krumboeck, Dietmar Schwarz, Thomas Hoffmeister, Birgit Schlick-Steiner, Florian Steiner, Arndt Telschow, Christian Stauffer, Wolfgang Arthofer, Markus Riegler, Birgit C. Schlick-Steiner, Florian M. Steiner & Thomas S. Hoffmeister
Wolbachia is a maternally inherited and ubiquitous endosymbiont of insects. It can hijack host reproduction by manipulations such as cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) to enhance vertical transmission. Horizontal transmission of Wolbachia can also result in the colonization of new mitochondrial lineages. In this study, we present a 15-year-long survey of Wolbachia in the cherry fruit fly Rhagoletis cerasi across Europe and the spatiotemporal distribution of two prevalent strains, wCer1 and wCer2, and associated mitochondrial haplotypes in...

Data from: A demographic ménage à trois: interactions between disturbances both amplify and dampen population dynamics of an endemic plant

Matthew R. Tye, Eric S. Menges, Carl Weekley, Pedro F. Quintana-Ascencio, Roberto Salguero-Gómez & Matthew Tye
Natural and anthropogenic disturbances co-occur in most systems, but how they interact to shape demographic outcomes remains poorly understood. Such interactions may alter dynamics of populations in non-additive ways, making demographic predictions challenging when focusing on only one disturbance. Thus, understanding the interactive effects of such disturbances is critically important to determine the population viability of most species under a diversity of stressors. We used a hierarchical integral projection model (IPM), parameterized with 13 years...

Data from: A new plant virus discovered by immunocapture of double stranded RNA; assessment of a novel approach for viral metagenomics studies

Arnaud G. Blouin, Howard A. Ross, Jody Hobson-Peters, Caitlin A. O’Brien, Ben Warren, Robin MacDiarmid & Caitlin A. O'Brien
Next-generation sequencing technologies enable the rapid identification of viral infection of diseased organisms. However, despite a consistent decrease in sequencing costs, it is difficult to justify their use in large-scale surveys without a virus sequence enrichment technique. As the majority of plant viruses have an RNA genome, a common approach is to extract the double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) replicative form, to enrich the replicating virus genetic material over the host background. The traditional dsRNA extraction is...

Data from: Potential mechanisms of coexistence in closely related forbs

Timothy L. Staples, John M. Dwyer, Xingwen Loy & Margaret M. Mayfield
The stable coexistence of very similar species has perplexed ecologists for decades and has been central to the development of coexistence theory. According to modern coexistence theory, species can coexist stably (i.e. persist indefinitely with no long-term density trends) as long as species' niche differences exceed competitive ability differences, even if these differences are very small. Recent studies have directly quantified niche and competitive ability differences in experimental communities at small spatial scales, but provide...

Data from: Parental exposure modulates the effects of UV-B on offspring in guppies

Ensiyeh Ghanizadeh Kazerouni, Craig E. Franklin & Frank Seebacher
1.The environment experienced by parents can alter offspring phenotypes. Such developmental plasticity is beneficial when it optimises offspring responses to their prevailing environment. Plasticity may be detrimental, however, if there is a mismatch between parental and offspring environments, although reversible acclimation within individuals could counteract a developmental mismatch. 2.UV-B radiation damages cells directly and by increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. There are indications that the developmental environment can influence ROS defences, which could enhance...

Data from: Evolutionary potential of the extrinsic incubation period of dengue virus in Aedes aegypti

Yixin H. Ye, Stephen F. Chenoweth, Alison M. Carrasco, Scott Lee Allen, Francesca D. Frentiu, Andrew F. Van Den Hurk, Nigel W. Beebe & Elizabeth A. McGraw
Dengue fever is the most common arboviral disease worldwide. It is caused by dengue viruses (DENV) and the mosquito Aedes aegypti is its primary vector. One of the most powerful determinants of a mosquito's ability to transmit DENV is the length of the extrinsic incubation period (EIP), the time it takes for a virus to be transmitted by a mosquito after consuming an infected blood meal. Here, we repeatedly measured DENV load in the saliva...

Data from: Immune-challenged fish up-regulate their metabolic scope to support locomotion

Camille Bonneaud, Robbie S. Wilson & Frank Seebacher
Energy-based trade-offs occur when investment in one fitness-related trait diverts energy away from other traits. The extent to which such trade-offs are shaped by limits on the rate of conversion of energy ingested in food (e.g. carbohydrates) into chemical energy (ATP) by oxidative metabolism rather than by the amount of food ingested in the first place is, however, unclear. Here we tested whether the ATP required for mounting an immune response will lead to a...

Data from: Epithelial magnesium transport by TRPM6 is essential for prenatal development and adult survival

Vladimir Chubanov, Thomas Gudermann, Wenke Jonas, Annette Schürmann, Önder A Yildirim, Yuriy Shymkiv, Alexey G Ryazanov, Christian Weber, Emiel PC Van Der Vorst, Harald Bartsch, Karl Sotlar, Attila Braun, David G Simmons, Silvia Ferioli, Annika Wisnowsky, Banu Akdogan, Lorenz Mittermeier, Ludmila Sytik, Susanna Zierler & Vindi Jurinovic
Mg2+ regulates many physiological processes and signalling pathways. However, little is known about the mechanisms underlying the organismal balance of Mg2+. Capitalizing on a set of newly generated mouse models, we provide an integrated mechanistic model of the regulation of organismal Mg2+ balance during prenatal development and in adult mice by the ion channel TRPM6. We show that TRPM6 activity in the placenta and yolk sac is essential for embryonic development. In adult mice, TRPM6...

Data from: Architecture of the sperm whale forehead facilitates ramming combat

Olga Panagiotopoulou, Panagiotis Spyridis, Hyab Mehari Abraha, David R. Carrier & Todd C. Pataky
Herman Melville’s novel Moby Dick was inspired by historical instances in which large sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus L.) sank 19th century whaling ships by ramming them with their foreheads. The immense forehead of sperm whales is possibly the largest, and one of the strangest, anatomical structures in the animal kingdom. It contains two large oil-filled compartments, known as the “spermaceti organ” and “junk”, that constitute up to one-quarter of body mass and extend one-third of...

Data from: Rapid evolution of the inter-sexual genetic correlation for fitness in Drosophila melanogaster

Julie M. Collet, Sara Fuentes, Jack Hesketh, Mark S. Hill, Paolo Innocenti, Edward H. Morrow, Kevin Fowler & Max Reuter
Sexual antagonism (SA) arises when male and female phenotypes are under opposing selection, yet genetically correlated. Until resolved, antagonism limits evolution towards optimal sex-specific phenotypes. Despite its importance for sex-specific adaptation and existing theory, the dynamics of SA resolution are not well understood empirically. Here, we present data from Drosophila melanogaster, compatible with a resolution of SA. We compared two independent replicates of the 'LHM' population in which SA had previously been described. Both had...

Data from: Australian spiny mountain crayfish and their temnocephalan ectosymbionts: an ancient association on the edge of coextinction?

Jennifer F. Hoyal Cuthill, Kim B. Sewell, Lester R. G. Cannon, Michael A. Charleston, Susan Lawler, D. Timothy J. Littlewood, Peter D. Olson & David Blair
Australian spiny mountain crayfish (Euastacus, Parastacidae) and their ecotosymbiotic temnocephalan flatworms (Temnocephalida, Platyhelminthes) may have co-occurred and interacted through deep time, during a period of major environmental change. Therefore, reconstructing the history of their association is of evolutionary, ecological, and conservation significance. Here, time-calibrated Bayesian phylogenies of Euastacus species and their temnocephalans (Temnohaswellia and Temnosewellia) indicate near-synchronous diversifications from the Cretaceous. Statistically significant cophylogeny correlations between associated clades suggest linked evolutionary histories. However, there is...

Data from: Variation of anal fin egg-spots along an environmental gradient in a haplochromine cichlid fish

Anya Theis, Olivia Roth, Fabio Cortesi, Fabrizia Ronco, Walter Salzburger & Bernd Egger
Male secondary sexual traits are targets of inter- and/or intrasexual selection, but can vary due to a correlation with life-history traits or as by-product of adaptation to distinct environments. Trade-offs contributing to this variation may comprise conspicuousness toward conspecifics versus inconspicuousness toward predators, or between allocating resources into coloration versus the immune system. Here, we examine variation in expression of a carotenoid-based visual signal, anal-fin egg-spots, along a replicate environmental gradient in the haplochromine cichlid...

Data from: Automated segmentation of skin strata in reflectance confocal microscopy depth stacks

Samuel C. Hames, Marco Ardigò, H. Peter Soyer, Andrew P. Bradley & Tarl W. Prow
Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a powerful tool for in-vivo examination of a variety of skin diseases. However, current use of RCM depends on qualitative examination by a human expert to look for specific features in the different strata of the skin. Developing approaches to quantify features in RCM imagery requires an automated understanding of what anatomical strata is present in a given en-face section. This work presents an automated approach using a bag of...

Data from: Getting a head in hard soils: convergent skull evolution and divergent allometric patterns explain shape variation in a highly diverse genus of pocket gophers (Thomomys)

Ariel E. Marcy, Elizabeth A. Hadly, Emma Sherratt, Kathleen Garland & Vera Weisbecker
Background: High morphological diversity can occur in closely related animals when selection favors morphologies that are subject to intrinsic biological constraints. A good example is subterranean rodents of the genus Thomomys, one of the most taxonomically and morphologically diverse mammalian genera. Highly procumbent, tooth-digging rodent skull shapes are often geometric consequences of increased body size. Indeed, larger-bodied Thomomys species tend to inhabit harder soils. We used geometric morphometric analyses to investigate the interplay between soil...

Data from: Using citizen-collected wildlife sightings to predict traffic strike hotspots for threatened species: a case study on the southern cassowary

Hamish A. Campbell, Luke Carpenter-Bundhoo, Ross G. Dwyer & Craig E. Franklin
Assessing the causal factors underpinning the distribution and abundance of wildlife road-induced mortality can be challenging. This is particularly ubiquitous for rare or elusive species, because traffic strikes occur infrequently for these populations and information about localized abundance, distribution, and movements are generally lacking. Here we assessed if citizen-collected sightings data may serve as a low cost and efficient means of gathering long-term animal road-side presence and road crossing information, which could then be used...

Data from: Colder environments did not select for a faster metabolism during experimental evolution of Drosophila melanogaster

Lesley A. Alton, Catriona Condon, Craig Robert White & Michael J. Angilletta
The effect of temperature on the evolution of metabolism has been the subject of debate for a century; however, no consistent patterns have emerged from comparisons of metabolic rate within and among species living at different temperatures. We used experimental evolution to determine how metabolism evolves in populations of Drosophila melanogaster exposed to one of three selective treatments: a constant 16°C, a constant 25°C, or temporal fluctuations between 16 and 25°C. We tested August Krogh's...

Data from: Functional traits in red flour beetles: the dispersal phenotype is associated with leg length but not body size nor metabolic rate

Pieter A. Arnold, Phill Cassey, Craig R. White & Phillip Cassey
Individuals vary in their ability to disperse. Much of this variation can be described by covarying phenotypic traits that are related to dispersal (constituting the ‘dispersal phenotype’ or ‘dispersal syndrome’), but the nature of the associations among these traits is not well understood. Unravelling the associations among traits that potentially constitute the dispersal phenotype provides a foundation for understanding evolutionary trade-offs due to variation in dispersal. Here, we tested five predictions pertaining to the relationships...

Data from: Extracting DNA from ‘jaws’: high yield and quality from archived tiger shark (Galeocerdo cuvier) skeletal material

Einar E. Nielsen, Jess A.T. Morgan, Safia L. Maher, Janette Edson, Maely Gauthier, Julian Pepperell, B. J. Holmes, Michael B. Bennett, Jennifer R. Ovenden & J. A. T. Morgan
Archived specimens are highly valuable sources of DNA for retrospective genetic/genomic analysis. However, often limited effort has been made to evaluate and optimize extraction methods, which may be crucial for downstream applications. Here, we assessed and optimized the usefulness of abundant archived skeletal material from sharks as a source of DNA for temporal genomic studies. Six different methods for DNA extraction, encompassing two different commercial kits and three different protocols, were applied to material, so-called...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    40

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    40

Affiliations

  • University of Queensland
    40
  • University of Sydney
    5
  • James Cook University
    4
  • University of Melbourne
    3
  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
    3
  • Australian National University
    2
  • University of Tasmania
    2
  • Monash University
    2
  • University College London
    2
  • University of Exeter
    2