27 Works

Data from: Pluripotency and the origin of animal multicellularity

Shunsuke Sogabe, William L. Hatleberg, Kevin M. Kocot, Tasha E. Say, Daniel Stoupin, Kathrein E. Roper, Selene L. Fernandez-Valverde, Sandie M. Degnan & Bernard M. Degnan
\A widely held—but rarely tested—hypothesis for the origin of animals is that they evolved from a unicellular ancestor, with an apical cilium surrounded by a microvillar collar, that structurally resembled modern sponge choanocytes and choanoflagellates. Here we test this view of animal origins by comparing the transcriptomes, fates and behaviours of the three primary sponge cell types—choanocytes, pluripotent mesenchymal archaeocytes and epithelial pinacocytes—with choanoflagellates and other unicellular holozoans. Unexpectedly, we find that the transcriptome of...

Data from: Primate hippocampus size and organization are predicted by sociality but not diet

Orlin Todorov, Vera Weisbecker, Emmanuel Gilissen, Karl Zilles & Alexandra Allison De Sousa
The hippocampus is well known for its roles in spatial navigation and memory, but it is organized into regions that have different connections and functional specializations. Notably, the region CA2 has a role in social cognition, and not spatial cognition as is the case for the regions CA1 and CA3 that surround it. Here we investigated the evolution of the hippocampus in terms of its size and its organization into regions in relation to the...

Data from: General rules for environmental management to prioritise social-ecological systems research based on a value of information approach

Katrina Davis, Iadine Chades, Jonathan Rhodes & Michael Bode
1. Globally, billions of dollars are invested each year to help understand the dynamics of social-ecological systems (SES) in bettering both social and environmental outcomes. However, there is no scientific consensus on which aspect of an SES is most important and urgent to understand; particularly given the realities of limited time and money. 2. Here we use a simulation-based “value of information” approach to examine where research will deliver the most important information for environmental...

Data from: Landscape structure mediates zoochorous-dispersed seed rain under isolated pasture trees across distinct tropical regions

Lachlan S. Charles, John D. Dwyer, Hazel M. Chapman, Biplang G. Yadok & Margaret M. Mayfield
Context: Isolated pasture trees play an important role in forest recovery within fragmented tropical landscapes by attracting seed dispersers and facilitating seedling growth. However, studies with conflicting results have led to confusion about what drives variation in zoochorous-dispersed seed rain patterns under isolated tree canopies. Objectives: To assess the role of landscape and biological factors impacting zoochorous-dispersed seed rain under isolated pasture trees across three tropical regions of the world. Methods: We measured seed dispersal...

Data from: The effects of vessel noise on the communication network of humpback whales

Rebecca Dunlop
Humpback whales likely rely on acoustic communication to mediate social interactions. The distance to which these social signals propagate from the signaller defines its communication space, and therefore communication network (number of potential receivers). As humpback whales migrate along populated coastlines, they are likely to encounter noise from vessel traffic which will mask their social signals. Since no empirical data exists on baleen whale hearing, the consequences of this are usually assumed, being the modelled...

Microbial associations and spatial proximity predict North American moose (Alces alces) gastrointestinal community composition

Nicholas Fountain-Jones, Nicholas Clark, Amy Kinsley, Michelle Carstensen, James Forester, Johnson Timothy, Elizabeth Miller, Seth Moore, Tiffany Wolf & Meggan Craft
Microbial communities are increasingly recognised as crucial for animal health. However, our understanding of how microbial communities are structured across wildlife populations is poor. Mechanisms such as interspecific associations are important in structuring free-living communities, but we still lack an understanding of how important interspecific associations are in structuring gut microbial communities in comparison to other factors such as host characteristics or spatial proximity of hosts. Here we ask how gut microbial communities are structured...

Differential Proteomic Expression of Equine Cardiac and Lamellar Tissue During Insulin-Induced Laminitis

Allison Campolo, Matthew Frantz, Melody De Laat, Steven Hartson, Martin Furr & Veronique Lacombe
Endocrinopathic laminitis is pathologically similar to the multi-organ dysfunction and peripheral neuropathy found in human patients with metabolic syndrome. Similarly, endocrinopathic laminitis has been shown to partially result from vascular dysfunction. However, despite extensive research, the pathogenesis of this disease is not well elucidated and laminitis remains without an effective treatment. Here, we sought to identify novel proteins and pathways underlying the development of equine endocrinopathic laminitis. Healthy Standardbred horses (n=4/group) were either given an...

Data from: Marine environmental DNA biomonitoring reveals seasonal patterns in biodiversity and identifies ecosystem responses to anomalous climatic events

Tina E. Berry, Benjamin J. Saunders, Megan L. Coghlan, Michael Stat, Simon Jarman, Anthony J. Richardson, Claire H. Davies, Oliver Berry, Euan S. Harvey & Michael Bunce
Marine ecosystems are changing rapidly as the oceans warm and become more acidic. The physical factors and the changes to ocean chemistry that they drive can all be measured with great precision. Changes in the biological composition of communities in different ocean regions are far more challenging to measure because most biological monitoring methods focus on a limited taxonomic or size range. Environmental DNA (eDNA) analysis has the potential to solve this problem in biological...

Data from: Upwelling as the major source of nitrogen for shallow and deep reef-building corals across an oceanic atoll system

Veronica Z. Radice, Ove Hoegh-Guldberg, Brian Fry, Michael D. Fox & Sophie G. Dove
Oceanographic processes shape coral reefs worldwide by redistributing inorganic nutrients and particulate resources over depth. Deep‐water upwelling occurs frequently in coral reef ecosystems, but its impact on coral nutrition remains unclear. This study investigated the influence of upwelling on the trophic ecology of three common reef‐building corals (Galaxea fascicularis, Pachyseris speciosa and Pocillopora verrucosa) from different reef depths (shallow reef, 10 m, vs. deep reef, 30 m) and reef exposures (oceanic rim vs. Inner Sea)...

Network analysis reveals underlying syntactic features in a vocally learnt mammalian display, humpback whale song

Jennifer Allen, Ellen Garland, Rebecca Dunlop & Michael Noad
Vocal communication systems have a set of rules that govern the arrangement of acoustic signals, broadly defined as ‘syntax’. However, there is a limited understanding of potentially shared or analogous rules across vocal displays in different taxa. Recent work on songbirds has investigated syntax using network-based modelling. This technique quantifies features such as connectivity (adjacent signals in a sequence) and recurring patterns. Here, we apply network-based modelling to the complex, hierarchically structured songs of humpback...

Data from: Motivations, success and cost of coral reef restoration

Elisa Bayraktarov, Phoebe J. Stewart-Sinclair, Shantala Brisbane, Audrey Van Herwaarden, Lisa Boström-Einarsson, Megan I. Saunders, Catherine E. Lovelock, Hugh P. Possingham, Peter J. Mumby & Kerrie A. Wilson
Coral reef restoration is an increasingly important part of tropical marine conservation. Information about what motivates coral reef restoration as well as its success and cost is not well understood but needed to inform restoration decisions. We systematically review and synthesise data from mostly scientific studies published in peer‐reviewed and grey literature on the motivations for coral reef restoration, the variables measured, outcomes reported, the cost per hectare of the restoration project, the survival of...

Data from: Self-deception in nonhuman animals: weak crayfish escalated aggression as if they were strong

Michael Angilletta, Gregory Kubitz & Robbie Wilson
Humans routinely deceive themselves when communicating to others, but no one knows whether other animals do the same. We ask whether dishonest signaling between crayfish meets a condition required for self-deception: dishonest individuals and honest individuals escalate aggression according to their signals of strength rather than actual strength. Using game theory, we predicted how an animal’s knowledge of its strength should affect its decision to escalate aggression. At the evolutionary equilibrium, an animal that knows...

Data from: Measuring the surrogacy potential of charismatic megafauna species across taxonomic, phylogenetic and functional diversity on a megadiverse island

Marsya C Sibarani, Moreno Di Marco, Carlo Rondinini & Salit Kark
1. Conservation organisations and governments often use charismatic megafauna as surrogates for representing broader biodiversity. While these species are primarily selected as “flagships” for marketing campaign, it is important to evaluate their surrogacy potential, i.e., the extent to which their protection benefits other biodiversity elements. Four charismatic megafauna species are used as surrogates in the megadiverse island of Sumatra: the Sumatran tiger Panthera tigris sumatrae, Sumatran elephant Elephas maximus sumatranus, Sumatran orangutan Pongo abelii and...

Data from: Multispecies invasion reduces the negative impact of single alien plant species on native flora

Magdalena Lenda, Piotr Skórka, Johannes Knops, Michał Żmihorski, Renata Gaj, Dawid Moroń, Michal Woyciechowski & Piotr Tryjanowski
Aim: In the current Anthropocene, many ecosystems are being simultaneously invaded by multiple alien species. Some of these invasive species become more dominant and have greater environmental impacts than others. If two potentially dominant species invade the same area, the combined impact has been reported to be either (1) domination by one species, i.e., the competitive dominance of one invader, or (2) invasion meltdown, where the combined impact is much greater, i.e., a synergistic effect....

Data from: Cardinalfishes (Apogonidae) show visual system adaptations typical of nocturnally and diurnally active fish

Martin Luehrmann, Karen Carleton, Fabio Cortesi, Karen Cheney & N. Marshall
Animal visual systems adapt to environmental light on various timescales. In scotopic conditions, evolutionary time-scale adaptations include spectral tuning to a narrower light spectrum, loss (or inactivation) of visual genes, and pure-rod or rod-dominated retinas. Some fishes inhabiting shallow coral reefs may show activity during the day and at night. It is unclear whether these fishes show adaptations typical of exclusively nocturnal or deep-sea fishes, or of diurnally active shallow-water species. Here, we investigated visual...

Data from: Genetic population structure and demography of an apex predator, the tiger shark Galeocerdo cuvier

Agathe Pirog, Sebastien Jaquemet, Virginie Ravigné, Geremy Cliff, Eric Clua, Bonnie J. Holmes, Nigel E. Hussey, John E.G. Nevill, Andrew J. Temple, Per Berggren, Laurent Vigliola & Hélène Magalon
Population genetics have been increasingly applied to study large sharks over the last decade. Whilst large shark species are often difficult to study with direct methods, improved knowledge is needed for both population management and conservation, especially for species vulnerable to anthropogenic and climatic impacts. The tiger shark, Galeocerdo cuvier, is an apex predator known to play important direct and indirect roles in tropical and sub-tropical marine ecosystems. While the global and Indo-West Pacific population...

The Appointment and Removal of the Head of Government of the Kiribati Republic

Peter W Edge, Jennifer Corrin & Claire de Than
This report examines the unique arrangements for the appointment and removal of the President of the Pacific state of Kiribati, in the context of political, historical and social factors. It outlines the potential for similar mechanisms to be introduced in the Isle of Man, while remaining aware of the significance of the constitutional, geographical and cultural differences between the two jurisdictions. The report concludes that the dual effect of a vote of no confidence in...

Data from: Look to seedling heights, rather than functional traits, to explain survival during extreme heat stress in the early stages of subtropical rainforest restoration

Ronald Gardiner, Luke Shoo & John Dwyer
1. Ecological restoration is urgently needed to arrest and reverse land degradation, reinstate ecosystem services and recover threatened species. Tree planting is a commonly used strategy to restore forests, however planted seedlings often experience low survival and slow growth during the establishment period. Critical evaluation of factors that lead to poor establishment is vital to improve practice but is often constrained by a lack of monitoring and reporting. 2. We took advantage of a large...

Integrating climate adaptation and biodiversity conservation in the global ocean

Derek Tittensor, Maria Beger, Kristina Boerder, Daniel Boyce, Rachel Cavanagh, Aurelie Cosandey-Godin, Guillermo Crespo, Daniel Dunn, Wildan Ghiffary, Susie Grant, Lee Hannah, Pat Halpin, Mike Harfoot, Susan Heaslip, Nicholas Jeffery, Naomi Kingston, Heike Lotze, Jennifer McGowan, Elizabeth McLeod, Chris McOwen, Bethan O'Leary, Laurenne Schiller, Ryan Stanley, Maxine Westhead, Kristen Wilson … & Boris Worm
The impacts of climate change and the socioecological challenges they present are ubiquitous and increasingly severe. Practical efforts to operationalize climate-responsive design and management in the global network of marine protected areas (MPAs) are required to ensure long-term effectiveness for safeguarding marine biodiversity and ecosystem services. Here, we review progress in integrating climate change adaptation into MPA design and management and provide eight recommendations to expedite this process. Climate-smart management objectives should become the default...

Data from: Visual system development of the spotted unicornfish, Naso brevirostris (Acanthuridae)

Valerio Tettamanti, Fanny De Busserolles, David Lecchini, N. Justin Marshall & Fabio Cortesi
Ontogenetic changes of the visual system are often correlated to shifts in habitat and feeding behaviour of animals. Coral reef fishes begin their lives in the pelagic zone and then migrate to the reef. This habitat transition frequently involves a change in diet and light environment as well as major morphological modifications. The spotted unicornfish, Naso brevirostris, is known to shift diet from zooplankton to algae and back to mainly zooplankton when transitioning from larval...

Comparative genomics reveals divergent thermal selection in warm- and cold-tolerant marine mussels

Iva Popovic & Cynthia Riginos
Investigating the history of natural selection among closely related species can elucidate how genomes diverge in response to disparate environmental pressures. Molecular evolutionary approaches can be integrated with knowledge of gene functions to examine how evolutionary divergence may affect ecologically-relevant traits such as temperature tolerance and species distribution limits. Here, we integrate transcriptome-wide analyses of molecular evolution with knowledge from physiological studies to develop hypotheses regarding the functional classes of genes under positive selection in...

Data from: Genome-wide diversity and demographic dynamics of Cameroon goats and their divergence from east African, north African, and Asian conspecifics

Getinet M. Tarekegn, Patrick Wouobeng, Kouam S. Jaures, Raphael Mrode, Zewdu Edea, Bin Liu, Wenguang Zhang, Okeyo A. Mwai, Tadelle Dessie, Kassahun Tesfaye, Erling Strandberg, Britt Berglund, Mutai Mutai, Sarah Osama, Asaminew T. Wolde, Josephine Birungi, Appolinaire Djikeng & Félix Meutchieye
Indigenous goats make significant contributions to Cameroon’s national and local economy, but little effort has been devoted to identifying the populations. Here, we assessed the genetic diversity and demographic dynamics of Cameroon goat populations using mitochondrial DNA (two populations) and autosomal markers (four populations) generated with the Caprine 50K SNP chip. To infer genetic relationships at continental and global level, genotype data on six goat populations from Ethiopia and one population each from Egypt, Morocco,...

Data from: Data gaps and opportunities for comparative and conservation biology

Dalia A. Conde, Johanna Staerk, Fernando Colchero, Rita Da Silva, Jonas Schöley, H. Maria Baden, Lionel Jouvet, John E. Fa, Hassan Syed, Eelke Jongejans, Shai Meiri, Jean-Michel Gaillard, Scott Chamberlain, Jonathan Wilcken, Owen R. Jones, Johan P. Dahlgren, Ulrich K. Steiner, Lucie M. Bland, Ivan Gomez-Mestre, Jean-Dominique Lebreton, Jaime González Vargas, Nate Flesness, Vladimir Canudas-Romo, Roberto Salguero-Gómez, Onnie Byers … & James W. Vaupel
Biodiversity loss is a major challenge. Over the past century, the average rate of vertebrate extinction has been about 100-fold higher than the estimated background rate and population declines continue to increase globally. Birth and death rates determine the pace of population increase or decline, thus driving the expansion or extinction of a species. Design of species conservation policies hence depends on demographic data (e.g., for extinction risk assessments or estimation of harvesting quotas). However,...

Data from: The molecular biogeography of the Indo-Pacific: testing hypotheses with multispecies genetic patterns

Eric D. Crandall, Cynthia Riginos, Chris E. Bird, Libby Liggins, Eric Treml, Maria Beger, Paul H. Barber, Sean R. Connolly, Peter F. Cowman, Joseph D. Dibattista, Jeff A. Eble, Sharon F. Magnuson, John B. Horne, Marc Kochzius, Harilaos A. Lessios, Shang Yin Vanson Liu, William B. Ludt, Hawis Madduppa, John M. Pandolfi, Robert R. Toonen, Contributing Members Of Diversity Of The Indo-Pacific Network & Michelle R. Gaither
Aim: To test hypothesized biogeographic partitions of the tropical Indo-Pacific Ocean with phylogeographic data from 56 taxa, and to evaluate the strength and nature of barriers emerging from this test. Location: The Indo-Pacific Ocean. Time Period: Pliocene through the Holocene. Major Taxa Studied: 56 marine species. Methods: We tested eight biogeographic hypotheses for partitioning of the Indo-Pacific using a novel modification to analysis of molecular variance. Putative barriers to gene flow emerging from this analysis...

Data from: Morphological and digestive adjustments buffer performance: how staging shorebirds cope with severe food declines

Shoudong Zhang, Zhijun Ma, Chi-Yeung Choi, He-Bo Peng, David S. Melville, Tian-Tian Zhao, Qing-Quan Bai, Wen-Liang Liu, Ying-Chi Chan, Jan A. Van Gils & Theunis Piersma
Organisms cope with environmental stressors by behavioral, morphological, and physiological adjustments. Documentation of such adjustments in the wild provides information on the response space in nature and the extent to which behavioral and bodily adjustments lead to appropriate performance effects. Here we studied the morphological and digestive adjustments in a staging population of migrating Great Knots Calidris tenuirostris in response to stark declines in food abundance and quality at the Yalu Jiang estuarine wetland (northern...

Registration Year

  • 2019
    27

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    26
  • Text
    1

Affiliations

  • University of Queensland
    27
  • PSL Research University
    2
  • University of Leeds
    2
  • Griffith University
    2
  • Vrije Universiteit Brussel
    1
  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    1
  • The Nature Conservancy
    1
  • National Sun Yat-sen University
    1
  • California State University, Monterey Bay
    1
  • Duke University
    1