65 Works

Fire Safety Engineering: Professional Development Report 6 of 8

David Lange, Peter Johnson, Jose Torero, Juan P Hidalgo, Cristian Maluk & Felix Wiesner
The Professional Development Report addresses the resource and skill constraints hindering the full professionalisation of fire safety engineering, in order to one day achieve a sustainable provision of fire safety engineering professionals.

Data from: Ecological pest control fortifies agricultural growth in Asia-Pacific economies

Kris Wyckhuys
The Green Revolution is credited with alleviating famine, mitigating poverty and driving aggregate economic growth since the 1960s. In Asia, high-input technology packages secured a tripling of rice output, with germplasm improvements providing benefits beyond US$ 4.3 billion/year. Here, we unveil the magnitude and macro-economic relevance of parallel nature-based contributions to productivity growth in non-rice crops over 1918-2018 (covering 23 different Asia-Pacific geopolitical entities). We empirically demonstrate how biological control resolved invasive pest threats in...

Skull shape of a widely-distributed, endangered marsupial reveals little evidence of local adaptation between fragmented populations

Pietro Viacava, Vera Weisbecker, Simone P. Blomberg, Gabriele Sansalone, Thomas Guillerme, Skye F. Cameron, Robbie S. Wilson & Matthew J. Phillips
The biogeographical distribution of diversity among populations of threatened mammalian species is generally investigated using population genetics. However, intraspecific phenotypic diversity is rarely assessed beyond taxonomy-focused linear measurements or qualitative descriptions. Here, we use a technique widely used in the evolutionary sciences – geometric morphometrics – to characterize shape diversity in the skull of an endangered marsupial, the northern quoll, across its 5,000 km distribution range along Northern Australia. Skull shape is a proxy for...

Data from: A cross-cultural investigation of young children’s spontaneous invention of tool use behaviors

Karri Neldner, Eva Reindl, Claudio Tennie, Julie Grant, Keyan Tomaselli & Mark Nielsen
Through the mechanisms of observation, imitation and teaching, young children readily pick up the tool using behaviors of their culture. However, little is known about the baseline abilities of children’s tool use: what they might be capable of inventing on their own in the absence of socially provided information. It has been shown that children can spontaneously invent 11 of 12 candidate tool using behaviors observed within the foraging behaviors of wild non-human apes (Reindl,...

Global human influence maps reveal clear opportunities in conserving Earth’s remaining intact terrestrial ecosystems

Jason Riggio, Jonathan E. M. Baillie, Steven Brumby, Erle Ellis, Christina M. Kennedy, James R. Oakleaf, Alex Tait, Therese Tepe, David M. Theobald, Oscar Venter, James E.M. Watson & Andrew P. Jacobson
Leading up to the 2020 Convention on Biological Diversity there is momentum around setting bold conservation targets. Yet it remains unclear how much of Earth’s land area remains without significant human influence and where this land is located. We compare four recent global maps of human influences across Earth’s land, Anthromes, Global Human Modification, Human Footprint, and Low Impact Areas, to answer these questions. Despite using various methodologies and data, these different spatial assessments independently...

Cardioespiratory physiological perturbations after acute smoke-induced lung injury and during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support in sheep

Saul Chemonges
Background: Numerous successful therapies developed for human medicine involve animal experimentation. Animal studies that are focused solely on translational potential, may not sufficiently document unexpected outcomes. Considerable amounts of data from such studies could be used to advance veterinary science. For example, sheep are increasingly being used as models of intensive care and therefore, data arising from such models must be published. In this study, the hypothesis is that there is little information describing physiological...

Data from: Priorities and motivations of marine coastal restoration research

Elisa Bayraktarov, Shantala Brisbane, Phoebe J Stewart-Sinclair, Audrey Van Herwaarden, Keila Stark, Valerie Hagger, Carter S Smith, Kerrie A Wilson, Catherine E Lovelock, Chris Gillies, Andrew D L Steven & Megan I Saunders
Active restoration is becoming an increasingly important conservation intervention to counteract the degradation of marine coastal ecosystems. Understanding what has motivated the scientific community to research the restoration of marine coastal ecosystems and how restoration research projects are funded is essential if we want to scale-up restoration interventions to meaningful extents.Here, we systematically review and synthesize data to understand the motivations for research on the restoration of coral reefs, seagrass, mangroves, saltmarsh, and oyster reefs....

Rubble Biodiversity Samplers (RUBS): 3D-printed coral models to standardise biodiversity censuses

Kennedy Wolfe & Peter Mumby
1. To ensure standardised, quantitative and repeatable methodologies, marine ecologists have engineered a range of artificial units to survey benthic communities with varying designs depending on target taxa, life history stage and habitat. In tropical ecosystems, autonomous units have typically lacked microhabitat complexity (e.g. planar tiles), short-term efficacy (> 1 y deployment) and/or a truly standardised design to sample cryptobenthic diversity. 2. Coral rubble is characterised by high microhabitat complexity, which is unresolved in sampling...

Misinformation, internet honey trading, and beekeepers drive a plant invasion

Magdalena Lenda, Piotr Skórka, Karolina Kuszewska, Dawid Moroń, Michał Bełcik, Renata Baczek Kwinta, Franciszek Janowiak, David H. Duncan, Peter A. Vesk, Hugh P. Possingham & Johannes M. H. Knops
Biological invasions are a major human induced global change that is threatening global biodiversity by homogenizing the world’s fauna and flora. Species spread because humans have moved species across geographic boundaries and have changed ecological factors that structure ecosystems, such as nitrogen deposition, disturbance, etc. Many biological invasions are caused accidentally, as a byproduct of human travel and commerce driven product shipping. However, humans also have spread many species intentionally because of perceived benefits. Of...

Data for the effect of optic flow cues on honeybee flight control in wind

Emily Baird, Norbert Boeddeker & Mandyam Srinivasan
To minimise the risk of colliding with the ground or other obstacles, flying animals need to control both their ground speed and ground height. This task is particularly challenging in wind, where head winds require an animal to increase its airspeed to maintain a constant ground speed and tail winds may generate negative airspeeds, rendering flight more difficult to control. In this study, we investigate how head and tail winds affect flight control in the...

Pre-introduction introgression contributes to parallel differentiation and contrasting hybridisation outcomes between invasive and native marine mussels

Iva Popovic, Nicolas Bierne, Federico Gaiti, Miloš Tanurdžić & Cynthia Riginos
Non-native species experience novel selection pressures in introduced environments and may interbreed with native lineages. Species introductions therefore provide opportunities to investigate repeated patterns of adaptation and introgression across replicated contact zones. Here, we investigate genetic parallelism between multiple introduced populations of the invasive marine mussel, Mytilus galloprovincialis, in the absence (South Africa and California) and presence of hybridisation with a native congener (Mytilus planulatus in Batemans Bay and Sydney Harbour, Australia). Repeatability in post-introduction...

Combined effects of climate change and the herbicide diuron on the coral Acropora millepora (NESP 2.1.6 and NESP TWQ 5.2, AIMS)

Flores Florita, Sven Uthicke, Frances Patel, Andrew Negri, Joseanne Marques & Kaserzon Sarit

Fire Safety Engineering: The Final Report 8 of 8

Peter Johnson, David Lange, Jose Torero, Ashley Brinson & Marianne Foley
The Final Report develops a pragmatic plan on a transition from the current state of fire safety engineering and design in Australia, which differs across states and territories in relation to regulation, registration, and other practice controls, to the required regulatory, education, accreditation and registration state which will ensure a full and proper profession for fire safety engineers.

Fire Safety Engineering: The Accreditation and Regulatory Reform Report 7 of 8

Nate Lobel, MC Hui, David Lange, Jose Torero & Peter Johnson
The Accreditation and Regulatory Reform Report sets a plan for how Australia should assess and accredit engineers who seek to practice fire safety design and take responsibility for public safety in their work

Fire Safety Engineering: Competencies Report 5 of 8

David Lange, Jose Torero, Cristian Maluk & Juan P Hidalgo
The Competencies Report points towards an accreditation framework for professional engineers in fire safety

Fire Safety Engineering: Comparison of FSE Guidance Documents and Assessment Criteria Special Report

Ashley Brinson, Peter Johnson, Stephen Kip, Jose Torero, David Lange & Tobias Salomonsson
The Comparison of FSE Guidance Documents and Assessment Criteria Report provides a review of four guidance documents for fire safety engineering to determine their suitability for use in Australia. A commissioned research report for the Australian Building Codes Board

Single-cell visualization indicates direct role of sponge host in uptake of dissolved organic matter

Michelle Achlatis, Mathieu Pernice, Kathryn Green, Jasper De Goeij, Paul Guagliardo, Matt Kilburn, Ove Hoegh-Guldberg & Sophie Dove
Marine sponges are set to become more abundant in many near-future oligotrophic environments, where they play crucial roles in nutrient cycling. Of high importance is their mass turnover of dissolved organic matter (DOM), a heterogeneous mixture that constitutes the largest fraction of organic matter in the ocean and is recycled primarily by bacterial mediation. Little is known however about the mechanism that enables sponges to incorporate large quantities of DOM in their nutrition, unlike most...

Data for: Angels in disguise: Sympatric hybridization in the marine angelfishes is widespread and occurs between deeply divergent lineages

Yi-Kai Tea, Jean-Paul Hobbs, Federico Vitelli, Joseph DiBattista, Simon Ho & Nathan Lo
Hybridization is not uncommon in marine environments where physical barriers are attenuated. Research conducted on hybridization in coral reefs has grown rapidly, but the majority of studies have focused on parapatric species along biogeographical suture zones. Comparatively little attention has been directed towards sympatric hybridization on coral reefs, despite the large amount of biogeographical overlap that occurs among coral reef species. Here we investigate if the propensity for hybridization along suture zones represents a general...

Population genomic response to geographic gradients by widespread and endemic fishes of the Arabian Peninsula

Joseph DiBattista, Pablo Saenz-Agudelo, Marek Piatek, Fernando Cagua, Brian Bowen, John Choat, Luiz Rocha, Michelle Gaither, Jean-Paul Hobbs, Tane Sinclair-Taylor, Jennifer McIlwain, Mark Priest, Camrin Braun, Nigel Hussey, Steven Kessel & Michael Berumen
Genetic structure within marine species may be driven by local adaptation to their environment, or alternatively by historical processes, such as geographic isolation. The gulfs and seas bordering the Arabian Peninsula offer an ideal setting to examine connectivity patterns in coral reef fishes with respect to environmental gradients and vicariance. The Red Sea is characterized by a unique marine fauna, historical periods of desiccation and isolation, as well as environmental gradients in salinity, temperature, and...

Data from: Aridity drives coordinated trait shifts but not decreased trait variance across the geographic range of eight Australian trees

Leander Anderegg, Xingwen Loy, Ian Markham, Christina Elmer, Mark Hovenden, Janneke HilleRisLambers & Margaret Mayfield
Large intraspecific functional trait variation strongly impacts many aspects of communities and ecosystems, and is the medium upon which evolution works. Yet intraspecific trait variation is inconsistent and hard to predict across traits, species, and locations. We measured within-species variation in leaf mass per area (LMA), leaf dry matter content (LDMC), branch wood density (WD), and allocation to stem area vs. leaf area in branches (branch Huber value, HV) across the aridity range of seven...

Change in terrestrial human footprint drives continued loss of intact ecosystems

Brooke Williams, Oscar Venter, James Allan, Scott Atkinson, Jose Rehbein, Michelle Ward, Moreno Di Marco, Hedley Grantham, Jamison Ervin, Scott Goetz, Andrew Hansen, Patrick Jantz, Rajeev Pillay, Susana Rodríguez-Buriticá, Christina Supples, Anne Virnig & James Watson
Human pressure mapping is important for understanding humanity's role in shaping Earth’s patterns and processes. Our ability to map this influence has evolved, thanks to powerful computing, earth observing satellites, and new bottom-up census and crowd-sourced data. Here, we provide the latest temporally inter-comparable maps of the terrestrial human footprint, and assessment of change in human pressure at global, biome, and ecoregional scales. In 2013, 42% of terrestrial Earth could be considered relatively free of...

Biotic exchange leaves detectable genomic patterns in the Australian rainforest flora

Jia-Yee Yap, Marlien Van Der Merwe, Andrew Ford, Robert Henry & Maurizio Rossetto
The movement (or invasion) of plant lineages from Sunda (the Malay Archipelago) into Sahul (mainland Australia) has resulted in a present-day Australian rainforest flora of mixed ancestries. Floristic integration increased during the Quaternary when continental vegetation was subjected to recurrent expansion/contraction cycles. To date, this expansion history has yet to be investigated through multi-species, landscape-level genetic analyses within tropical Northern Australia, presumably the main point of contact for Sunda lineages. Here, we characterise and compare...

Microhabitat partitioning correlates with opsin gene expression in coral reef cardinalfishes (Apogonidae)

Martin Luehrmann, Fabio Cortesi, Karen Cheney, Fanny De Busserolles & Justin Marshall
Fish are the most diverse vertebrate group, and they have evolved equally diverse visual systems, varying in terms of eye morphology, number and distribution of spectrally distinct photoreceptor types, visual opsin genes and opsin gene expression levels. This variation is mainly due to adaptations driven by two factors: differences in the light environments and behavioural tasks. However, while the effects of large-scale habitat differences are well described, it is less clear whether visual systems also...

Data from: Longevity, body dimension and reproductive mode drive differences in aquatic versus terrestrial life history strategies

Pol Capdevila, Maria Beger, Simone Blomberg, Bernat Hereu, Cristina Linares & Roberto Salguero-Gómez
1. Aquatic and terrestrial environments display stark differences in key environmental factors and phylogenetic composition but their consequences for the evolution of species’ life history strategies remain poorly understood. 2. Here, we examine whether and how life history strategies vary between terrestrial and aquatic species. We use demographic information for 685 terrestrial and 122 aquatic animal and plant species to estimate key life history traits. We then use phylogenetically corrected least squares regression to explore...

Aggressive interactions between cavity nesting birds in SE QLD Australia

Andrew Rogers
1. Context: A mechanistic understanding of the drivers of competition between species at a community level can improve invasive species management by helping identify where and when impacts are likely to be greatest. Invasive cavity-breeding birds provide a way to test shared traits and resource requirements are related to intensity of competition. Australia is home to one of the richest cavity-nesting communities globally with over 100 native and introduced bird species requiring hollows: but the...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    65

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    56
  • Text
    9

Affiliations

  • University of Queensland
    65
  • University College London
    8
  • University of Sydney
    5
  • Arup Group (United Kingdom)
    4
  • University of Washington
    3
  • The Nature Conservancy
    3
  • University of Tasmania
    3
  • Monash University
    3
  • Curtin University
    3
  • Queensland University of Technology
    3