39 Works

Factors influencing nature interactions vary between cities and types of nature interactions

Rui Ying Rachel Oh, Kelly Fielding, Thi Phuong Le Nghiem, Chia-Chen Chang, Danielle Shanahan, Kevin Gaston, Román Carrasco & Richard Fuller
1. There is mounting concern that people living more urbanised, modern lifestyles have fewer and lower quality interactions with nature, and therefore have limited access to the associated health and wellbeing benefits. Yet, variation in the different types of nature interactions and the factors that influence these interactions across populations are poorly understood. 2. We compared four types of nature interactions by administering surveys across two cities that differ markedly in urbanisation pattern and population...

Facebook: Regulating Hate Speech in the Asia Pacific

Aim Sinpeng, Fiona Martin, Katharine Gelber & Kirril Shields

Deafness in Australian Cattle Dogs associated to QTL on chromosome 20 in GWAS analyses

Jenny Seddon, Susan Sommerlad & Marina Fortes
Pigment-associated deafness is a common hereditary condition in a range of dog breeds. The aim of this study was to perform a genome-wide association analysis to investigate the genetic architecture of deafness in Australian Cattle Dogs. Genotypes for 104,757 polymorphisms in 96 Australian dogs were available for analyses after quality control and included here. Further samples from US and UK are available here (https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.sf7m0cg2n). A genomic relationship matrix was used in the mixed model analyses...

The conspecific avoidance strategies of adult female-calf humpback whales

Katherine Indeck, Michael Noad & Rebecca Dunlop
During migration, humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) adult females and their calves use acoustic calling to help maintain contact. The signals produced by these pairs, however, may unintentionally attract nearby breeding males, which can result in interactions that have negative physical and physiological effects on the calf. Therefore, maternal females must choose the vocal and/or behavioral strategy that most effectively balances intra-pair communication with male avoidance. Here, we analyzed differences in adult female-calf vocal activity and...

Single molecule tracking raw data: SOX18 and its dominant-negative mutant SOX18RaOp

Alex McCann, Jieqiong Lou, Mehdi Moustaqil, Matthew Graus, Ailisa Blum, Frank Fontaine, Hui Liu, Winnie Luu, Peter Koopman, Emma Sierecki, Yann Gambin, Frédéric Meunier, Zhe Liu, Elizabeth Hinde & Mathias Francois
Few genetically dominant mutations involved in human disease have been fully explained at the molecular level. In cases where the mutant gene encodes a transcription factor, the dominant-negative mode of action of the mutant protein is particularly poorly understood. Here, we studied the genome-wide mechanism underlying a dominant-negative form of the SOX18 transcription factor (SOX18RaOp) responsible for both the classical mouse mutant Ragged Opossum and the human genetic disorder Hypotrichosis-Lymphedema-Telangiectasia-Renal Syndrome. Combining three single-molecule imaging...

Self‐Assembly, Adaptive Response, and in , out‐ Stereoisomerism of Large Orthoformate Cryptands

Max von Delius, Henrik Löw, Elena Mena‐Osteritz, Kathleen M. Mullen & Christof Jäger
Abstract We report on triethylene glycol-based orthoformate cryptands, which adapt their bridgehead configurations in response to metal templates and intramolecular hydrogen bonding in a complex ma...

Effect of Physical Activity Intelligence (PAI) monitoring in the maintenance phase of cardiac rehabilitation: A mixed methods evaluation

Amanda Hannan, Wayne Hing, Jeff Coombes, Suzanne Gough, Mike Climstein, Geoff Adsett, Satyajit Rohan Jayasinghe & James Furness
Dataset of the results of PAI monitoring on the amount and/or intensity of physical activity for people with cardiac disease and participants’ perceptions of this approach.

Valuing Cooperation and Constructive Controversy: A Tribute to David W. Johnson

Dean Tjosvold, Daniel Druckman, Roger Johnson, Karl Smith & Cary Roseth

Human-associated microbiota suppress invading bacteria even under disruption by antibiotics

Andrew Letten, Michael Baumgartner, Katia Pfrunder-Cardozo, Jonathan Levine & Alex Hall
In light of their adverse impacts on resident microbial communities, it is widely predicted that broad-spectrum antibiotics can promote the spread of resistance by releasing resistant strains from competition with other strains and species. We investigated the competitive suppression of a resistant strain of Escherichia coli inoculated into human-associated communities in the presence and absence of the broad and narrow spectrum antibiotics rifampicin and polymyxin B, respectively. We found strong evidence of community-level suppression of...

Data from: Plant communities, populations and individuals have distinct responses to short-term warming and neighbour biomass removal in two montane grasslands

Travis Britton, Mark Hovenden, Meagan Porter, Rose Brinkhoff, Anna Flittner & Margaret Mayfield
Aims Climate change will impact plant communities and populations but also individual plant performance. Most predictive models of community responses to climate change ignore individual‐level biotic interactions despite their known importance for community diversity and functioning. Here, we consider plant fitness and diversity responses to climate change associated factors at three organisational levels: communities, populations and individual plants, to increase our understanding of how plant communities respond to climate change. Location Montane grassland, Tasmania, Australia....

The visual ecology of Holocentridae, a nocturnal coral reef fish family with a deep-sea-like multibank retina

Fanny De Busserolles, Fabio Cortesi, Lily Fogg, Martin Luehrmann, Sara Stieb & Justin Marshall
The visual systems of teleost fishes usually match their habitats and lifestyles. Since coral reefs are bright and colourful environments, the visual systems of their diurnal inhabitants have been more extensively studied than those of nocturnal species. In order to fill this knowledge gap, we conducted a detailed investigation of the visual system of the nocturnal reef fish family Holocentridae. Results showed that the visual system of holocentrids is well adapted to their nocturnal lifestyle...

Delimiting cryptic species within the brown-banded bamboo shark, Chiloscyllium punctatum in the Indo-Australian region with mitochondrial DNA and genome-wide SNP approaches

Fahmi Fahmi, Christine Dudgeon, Ian Tibbetts, Mike Bennett & Chris Dudgeon
Background Delimiting cryptic species in elasmobranchs is a major challenge in modern taxonomy due the lack of available phenotypic features. Employing stand-alone genetics in splitting a cryptic species may prove problematic for further studies and for implementing conservation management. In this study, we examined mitochondrial DNA and genome-wide nuclear single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the brown-banded bambooshark, Chiloscyllium punctatum to evaluate potential cryptic species and the species-population boundary in the group. Results Both mtDNA and...

Data from: Opsins in Onychophora (velvet worms) suggest a single origin and subsequent diversification of visual pigments in arthropods

Lars Hering, Miriam J. Henze, Martin Kohler, Almut Kelber, Christoph Bleidorn, Maren Leschke, Birgit Nickel, Matthias Meyer, Martin Kircher, Paul Sunnucks & Georg Mayer
Multiple visual pigments, prerequisites for color vision, are found in arthropods, but the evolutionary origin of their diversity remains obscure. In this study, we explore the opsin genes in five distantly related species of Onychophora, using deep transcriptome sequencing and screening approaches. Surprisingly, our data reveal the presence of only one opsin gene (onychopsin) in each onychophoran species, and our behavioral experiments indicate a maximum sensitivity of onychopsin to blue–green light. In our phylogenetic analyses,...

Barriers in a sea of elasmobranchs

Maximilian Hirschfeld, Christine Dudgeon, Marcus Sheaves & Adam Barnett
Background The interplay of animal dispersal and environmental heterogeneity is fundamental for the distribution of biodiversity on earth. In the ocean, the interaction of physical barriers and dispersal has primarily been examined for organisms with planktonic larvae. Animals that lack a planktonic life stage and depend on active dispersal are however likely to produce distinctive patterns. Methods We used available literature on population genetics and phylogeography of elasmobranchs (sharks, rays and skates), to examine how...

Caterpillar polarisation vision: Histological methods and Rcodes for behavioural analyses

Mizuki Uemura, Andrej Meglič, Myron Zalucki, Andrea Battisti & Gregor Belušič
Processionary caterpillars of Thaumetopoea pityocampa (in Europe) and Ochrogaster lunifer (in Australia) (Lepidoptera: Notodontidae) form single files of larvae crawling head-to-tail when moving to feeding and pupation sites. We investigated if the processions are guided by polarisation vision. The heading orientation of processions could be manipulated with linear polarising filters held above the leading caterpillar. Exposure to changes in the angle of polarisation around the caterpillar resulted in orthogonal changes in heading angles. Anatomical analysis...

Better left alone: Trying to control pasture grasses in untended rainforest plantings incurs multiple costs and delivers few benefits

Julian Radford-Smith & John Dwyer
1. Rainforest revegetation projects often deliver suboptimal outcomes due to the recolonisation of invasive pasture grasses, but little is known about the effects of grass reinvasion on the survival and growth of established saplings. Even less is known about the costs and benefits of controlling pasture grasses once they have reinvaded. 2. To address these knowledge gaps, we implemented a split-plot grass control experiment in a two-year old subtropical rainforest restoration planting in South East...

Subcellular view of host–microbiome nutrient exchange in sponges: insights into the ecological success of an early metazoan–microbe symbiosis

Meggie Hudspith, Laura Rix, Michelle Achlatis, Jeremy Bougoure, Paul Guagliardo, Peta L. Clode, Nicole S. Webster, Gerard Muyzer, Mathieu Pernice & Jasper M. De Goeij
Background: Sponges are increasingly recognised as key ecosystem engineers in many aquatic habitats. They play an important role in nutrient cycling due to their unrivalled capacity for processing both dissolved and particulate organic matter (DOM and POM) and the exceptional metabolic repertoire of their diverse and abundant microbial communities. Functional studies determining the role of host and microbiome in organic nutrient uptake and exchange, however, are limited. Therefore, we coupled pulse-chase isotopic tracer techniques with...

Data from: Fossil dermal denticles reveal the pre-exploitation baseline of a Caribbean coral reef shark community

Erin Dillon, Douglas McCauley, Jorge Manuel Morales-Saldaña, Nicole Leonard, Jian-Xin Zhao & Aaron O'Dea
Pre-exploitation shark baselines and the history of human impact on coral reef-associated shark communities in the Caribbean are poorly understood. We recovered shark dermal denticles from mid-Holocene (~7 ka) and modern reef sediments in Bocas del Toro, Caribbean Panama to reconstruct an empirical shark baseline before major human impact and quantify how much the modern shark community in the region had shifted from this historical reference point. We found that denticle accumulation rates, a proxy...

Change and persistence of hunting & dietary practices among Kadazandusun-Murut (KDM) bearded pig hunters in Sabah, Malaysia

David Kurz, Fiffy Saikim, Vanielie Justine, Jordan Bloem, Matthew Libassi, Matthew Luskin, Lauren Withey, Benoit Goossens, Justin Brashares & Matthew Potts
This dataset consists of 38 semi-structured interviews that we conducted with Kadazandusun-Murut (KDM) hunters in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo. The dataset is based on information shared during over 50 hours of time with the hunters. The data cover a variety of topics about the relationships between KDM hunters and bearded pigs, the favored game animal for this hunting group. We asked the hunters about their hunting and dietary practices, changes in hunting practices, and perceived changes...

Reef cover classification (v1): internal coral reef class descriptors for global coral reef habitat mapping

Emma Kennedy, Stuart Phinn & Chris Roelfsema
Reef Cover Classification (version 1) document contains seventeen intra-reef geomorphic Reef Cover descriptors, developed for shallow-water tropical coral reef habitat mapping. Reef Cover describes spatially explicit zonal reef features that can be applied in different academic disciplines (e.g. geography, ecology, oceanography, marine sciences, marine policy and planning) as a geographical reference (e.g. to support political decision making or scientific research). The categorization is designed to be simple and inclusive in order to support broad-scale comparisons...

Quantitative assessment of agricultural sustainability reveals divergent priorities among nations

Guolin Yao, Xin Zhang, Srishti Vishwakarma, Carole Dalin, Adam Komarek, David Kanter, Kyle Davis, Kimberly Pfeifer, Jing Zhao, Tan Zou, Paolo D'Odorico, Christian Folberth, Fernando Galeana Rodriguez, Jessica Fanzo, Lorenzo Rosa, William Dennison, Mark Musumba, Amy Heyman & Eric Davidson
Agriculture is fundamental to all three pillars of sustainability, environment, society, and economy. However, the definition of sustainable agriculture and capacities to measure it remain elusive. Independent and transparent measurements of national sustainability are needed to gauge progress, encourage accountability, and inform policy. Here, we developed a Sustainable Agriculture Matrix (SAM) to quantify national performance indicators in agriculture and to investigate the tradeoffs and synergies based on historical data for most countries of the world....

Protecting the global ocean for biodiversity, food and climate

Enric Sala, Juan Mayorga, Darcy Bradley, Reniel Cabral, Trisha Atwood, Arnaud Auber, William Cheung, Francesco Ferretti, Alan Friedlander, Steven Gaines, Cristina Garilao, Whitney Goodell, Benjamin Halpern, Audra Hinson, Kristin Kaschner, Kathleen Kesner-Reyes, Fabien Leprieur, Jennifer McGowan, Lance Morgan, David Mouillot, Juliano Palacios-Abrantes, Hugh Possingham, Kristin Rechberger, Boris Worm & Jane Lubchenco
The ocean contains unique biodiversity, provides valuable food resources, and is a major sink for anthropogenic carbon. Marine protected areas (MPAs) are an effective tool for restoring ocean biodiversity and ecosystem services but at present only 2.7% of the ocean is highly protected. This low level of ocean protection is due largely to conflicts with fisheries and other extractive uses. To address this issue, here we developed a conservation planning framework to prioritize highly protected...

Hull fouling marine invasive species pose a very low, but plausible, risk of introduction to East Antarctica in climate change scenarios

Oakes Holland, Justine Shaw, Jonathan Stark & Kerrie Wilson
Aims: To identify potential hull fouling marine invasive species that could survive in East Antarctica presently and in the future. Location: Australia's Antarctic continental stations: Davis, Mawson and Casey, East Antarctica; and subantarctic islands: Macquarie Island and Heard and McDonald Islands. Methods: Our study uses a novel machine-learning algorithm to predict which currently known hull fouling MIS could survive in shallow benthic ecosystems adjacent to Australian Antarctic research stations and subantarctic islands, where ship traffic...

Distribution and habitat attributes associated with the Himalayan red panda in the westernmost distribution range

Saroj Shrestha, Arjun Thapa, Damber Bista, Natasha Robinson, Ang Sherpa, Krishna Acharya, Shant Jnawali, Sonam Lama & Sony Lama
The Himalayan red panda (Ailurus fulgens), a recently confirmed distinct species in the red panda genus, is distributed in Nepal, India, Bhutan and south Tibet. Nepal represents the western most distribution of the Himalayan red panda. This study aim to determine important habitat features influencing the distribution of red panda and recommend possible habitat corridors. This manuscript described current potential habitat of 3,222 km2 with the relative abundance of 3.34 signs/km in Nepal. Aspect, canopy...

Data for: Spatial and temporal genetic variation in an exploited reef fish: The effects of exploitation on cohort genetic structure

Zahra Taboun, Ryan Walter, Jennifer Ovenden & Daniel Heath
Many coral reef fishes are fished, often resulting in detrimental genetic effects; however, reef fishes often show unpredictable patterns of genetic variation, which potentially mask the effects of fishing. Our goals were to characterize spatial and temporal genetic variation and determine the effects of fishing on an exploited reef fish, Plectropomus leopardus, Lacepède (the common coral trout). To determine population structure, we genotyped 417 Great Barrier Reef coral trout from four populations sampled in two...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    39

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    35
  • Report
    2
  • Journal Article
    1
  • Text
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Affiliations

  • University of Queensland
    39
  • University of Sydney
    4
  • UNSW Sydney
    4
  • University of Melbourne
    3
  • Griffith University
    3
  • Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
    3
  • Janelia Farm Research Campus
    2
  • Australian National University
    2
  • University of California, Berkeley
    2
  • Macquarie University
    2