63 Works

Common palm civets (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus) are positively associated with humans and forest degradation with implications for seed dispersal and zoonotic diseases

Bastien Dehaudt, Zachary Amir, Henri Decoeur, Luke Gibson, Calebe Pereira Mendes, Jonathan Moore, Ilyas Nursamsi, Adia Sovie & Matthew Luskin
Habitat loss and degradation can undermine wildlife communities and ecosystem functioning. However, certain generalist wildlife species like mesopredators and omnivores can exploit these disturbed habitats, sometimes leading to population increases (e.g., “mesopredator release” in degraded areas). Although mesopredator release may cause negative effects on food webs and zoonotic disease management, some disturbance-tolerant species may help perpetuate important ecological interactions, such as seed dispersal. We evaluated the habitat associations of common palm civets (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus), which...

Variable seed bed microsite conditions and light influence germination in Australian winter annuals

Isaac Towers, David Merritt, Todd Erickson, Margaret Mayfield & John Dwyer
Environmentally cued germination may play an important role in promoting coexistence in Mediterranean annual plant systems if it causes niche differentiation across heterogeneous microsite conditions. In this study, we tested how microsite conditions experienced by seeds in the field and light conditions in the laboratory influenced germination in 12 common annual plant species occurring in the understorey of the York gum-jam woodlands in southwest Western Australia. Specifically, we hypothesized that if germination promotes spatial niche...

Feasibility and preliminary efficacy for morning bright light therapy to improve sleep and plasma biomarkers in US Veterans with TBI. A prospective, open-label, single-arm trial

Jonathan Elliott, Alisha McBride, Nadir Balba, Stanley Thomas, Cassandra Pattinson, Benjamin Morasco, Andrea Wilkerson, Jessica Gill & Miranda Lim
Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with persistent sleep-wake dysfunction, including insomnia and circadian rhythm disruption, which can exacerbate functional outcomes including mood, pain, and quality of life. Present therapies to treat sleep-wake disturbances in those with TBI (e.g., cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia) are limited by marginal efficacy, poor patient acceptability, and/or high patient/provider burden. Thus, this study aimed to assess the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of morning bright light therapy, to improve...

Data from: How well do embryo development rate models derived from laboratory data predict embryo development in sea turtle nests?

David Booth
Development rate of ectothermic animals varies with temperature. Here we use data derived from laboratory constant temperature incubation experiments to formulate development rate models that can be used to model embryonic development rate in sea turtle nests. We then use a novel method for detecting the time of hatching to measure the in situ incubation period of sea turtle clutches to test the accuracy of our models in predicting the incubation period from nest temperature...

Transcript- and annotation-guided genome assembly of the European starling

Katarina Stuart, Richard Edwards, Yuanyuan Cheng, Wes Warren, Dave Burt, William Sherwin, Natalie Hofmeister, Scott Werner, Gregory Ball, Melissa Bateson, Matthew Brandley, Katherine Buchanan, Phillip Cassey, David Clayton, Tim De Meyer, Simone Meddle & Lee Rollins
The European starling, Sturnus vulgaris, is an ecologically significant, globally invasive avian species that is also suffering from a major decline in its native range. Here, we present the genome assembly and long-read transcriptome of an Australian-sourced European starling (S. vulgaris vAU), and a second North American genome (S. vulgaris vNA), as complementary reference genomes for population genetic and evolutionary characterisation. S. vulgaris vAU combined 10x Genomics linked-reads, low-coverage Nanopore sequencing, and PacBio Iso-Seq full-length...

Data from: Neuroanatomy of the mekosuchine crocodylian Trilophosuchus rackhami Willis, 1993

Jorgo Ristevski
Although our knowledge on crocodylomorph palaeoneurology has experienced considerable growth in recent years, the neuroanatomy of many crocodylomorph taxa has yet to be studied. This is true for Australian taxa, where thus far only two crocodylian crocodylomorphs have had aspects of their neuroanatomy explored. Here, the neuroanatomy of the Australian mekosuchine crocodylian Trilophosuchus rackhami is described for the first time, which significantly increases our understanding on the palaeoneurology of Australian crocodylians. The palaeoneurological description is...

Susceptibility to a sexually transmitted disease in a wild koala population shows heritable genetic variance but no inbreeding depression

Kasha Strickland, Romane Cristescu, Anthony Schultz, Loeske Kruuk, Deirdre De Villiers & Celine Frere
The koala, one of the most iconic Australian wildlife species, is facing several concomitant threats that are driving population declines. Some threats are well known and have clear methods of prevention (e.g., habitat loss can be reduced with stronger land-clearing control), whereas others are less easily addressed. One of the major current threats to koalas is chlamydial disease, which can have major impacts on individual survival and reproduction rates and can translate into population declines....

Marbled cats in Southeast Asia: Are diurnal and semi-arboreal felids at greater risk from human disturbances?

Matthew Luskin, Alexander Hendry, Zachary Amir, Henri Decoeur, Calebe Pereira Mendes, Jonathan Moore & Adia Sovie
Southeast Asia supports the greatest diversity of felids globally, but this felid diversity is likely to be threatened by the severe forest loss and degradation that is occurring in the region. The response of felids to disturbances appears to differ depending on their ecology. For example, the largely terrestrial and nocturnal leopard cat (Prionailurus bengalensis) thrives near forest edges and in oil palm plantations where it hunts rodents (Muridae) at night, thereby avoiding human activity...

Data for: Long-wavelength-sensitive (lws) opsin gene expression, foraging and visual communication in coral reef fishes

Sara Stieb, Fabio Cortesi, Luiz Jardim De Queiroz, Karen Carleton, Ole Seehausen & Justin Marshall
Coral reef fishes are diverse in ecology and behaviour and show remarkable colour variability. Investigating the visual pigment gene (opsin) expression in these fishes makes it possible to associate their visual genotype and phenotype (spectral sensitivities) to visual tasks such as feeding strategy or conspecific detection. By studying relative opsin expression in all major damselfish clades (Pomacentridae) and representatives from five other coral reef fish families, we show that the long-wavelength-sensitive (lws) opsin gene is...

Supplemental Material, sj-pdf-1-ojs-10.1177_23259671221124141 - Do the General Public and Health Care Professionals Think That Running Is Bad for the Knees? A Cross-sectional International Multilanguage Online Survey

Jean-Francois Esculier, Manuela Besomi, Danilo de Oliveira Silva, Samuele Passigli, Michael Skovdal Rathleff, Marienke Van Middelkoop, Christian Barton, Michael J. Callaghan, Matthew S. Harkey, Alison M. Hoens, Natasha M. Krowchuk, Anthony Teoli, Bill Vicenzino, Richard W. Willy & Michael A. Hunt
Supplemental Material, sj-pdf-1-ojs-10.1177_23259671221124141 for Do the General Public and Health Care Professionals Think That Running Is Bad for the Knees? A Cross-sectional International Multilanguage Online Survey by Jean-Francois Esculier, Manuela Besomi, Danilo de Oliveira Silva, Samuele Passigli, Michael Skovdal Rathleff, Marienke Van Middelkoop, Christian Barton, Michael J. Callaghan, Matthew S. Harkey, Alison M. Hoens, Natasha M. Krowchuk, Anthony Teoli, Bill Vicenzino, Richard W. Willy and Michael A. Hunt in Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine

Taxonomic revision reveals potential impacts of Black Summer megafires on a cryptic species

Chris Jolly, Harry Moore, Mitchell Cowan, Teigan Cremona, Judy Dunlop, Sarah Legge, Grant Linley, Vivianna Miritis, John Woinarski & Dale Nimmo
Context: Sound taxonomy is the cornerstone of biodiversity conservation. Without a fundamental understanding of species delimitations, as well as their distributions and ecological requirements, our ability to conserve them is drastically impeded. Cryptic species – two or more distinct species currently classified as a single species – present a significant challenge to biodiversity conservation. How do we assess the conservation status and address potential drivers of extinction if we are unaware of a species’ existence?...

Humpback whale adult females and calves balance acoustic contact with vocal crypsis during periods of increased separation

Katherine Indeck, Michael Noad & Rebecca Dunlop
Acoustic communication is important for animals with dependent young, particularly when they are spatially separated. Maternal humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) use acoustic calling to help minimise the risk of separation from their young calves during migration. These pairs also use acoustic crypsis to minimise detection by males. How they balance a restricted active space with the need to maintain acoustic contact during periods of separation is not yet understood. Here, we analysed movement metrics of...

The consequences of coastal offsets for fisheries

Deqiang Ma, Jonathan Rhodes & Martine Maron
Biodiversity offsetting is increasingly used to mitigate biodiversity impacts from development, but the practice of offsetting rarely considers how to also mitigate losses of ecosystem services. Offset rules, such as how near an offset must be to an impact site, may help ensure biodiversity offsets also counterbalance losses of ecosystem services but this has not yet well understood. We explored how different rules for siting coastal offsets could change net impacts to a provisioning ecosystem...

A Turning Points analysis of Cross-Border Merger and Acquisition Negotiations

Yadvinder S. Rana, Daniel Druckman & Jesus Canduela
Despite the recent increase in Cross-Border Merger and Acquisition (CBMA) activity, research has repeatedly determined that over 70 percent of CBMAs fail to deliver the promised results, with evidence pointing to ineffective negotiation process management as one of the crucial factors explaining CBMA failure. We perform a turning points analysis of nine negotiations between automobile manufacturers. The findings indicate that negotiation outcomes are significantly influenced by substantive and strategic elements internal to the negotiation process....

Data from: A data-driven geospatial workflow to map species distributions for conservation assessments

Ruben Dario Palacio, Pablo Jose Negret, Jorge Veláquez-Tibatá & Andrew P Jacobson
We developed a geospatial workflow that refines the distribution of a species from its extent of occurrence (EOO) to area of habitat (AOH) within the species range map. The range maps are produced with an inverse distance weighted (IDW) interpolation procedure using presence and absence points derived from primary biodiversity data (GBIF and eBird hotspots respectively). Here we provide sample data to run the geospatial workflow for nine forest species across Mexico and Central America.

Different genes are recruited during convergent evolution of pregnancy and the placenta

Charles Foster, James Van Dyke, Michael Thompson, Nicholas Smith, Colin Simpfendorfer, Christopher Murphy & Camilla Whittington
The repeated evolution of the same traits in distantly related groups (convergent evolution) raises a key question in evolutionary biology: do the same genes underpin convergent phenotypes? Here, we explore one such trait, viviparity (live birth), which, qualitative studies suggest, may indeed have evolved via genetic convergence. There are 150 independent origins of live birth in vertebrates, providing a uniquely powerful system to test the mechanisms underpinning convergence in morphology, physiology, and/or gene recruitment during...

Data from: Testing hypotheses of marsupial brain size variation using phylogenetic multiple imputations and a Bayesian comparative framework

Orlin S. Todorov
Considerable controversy exists about which hypotheses and variables best explain mammalian brain size variation. We use a new, high-coverage dataset of marsupial brain and body sizes, and the first phylogenetically imputed full datasets of 16 predictor variables, to model the prevalent hypotheses explaining brain size evolution using phylogenetically corrected Bayesian generalised linear mixed-effects modelling. Despite this comprehensive analysis, litter size emerges as the only significant predictor. Marsupials differ from the more frequently studied placentals in...

Additional file 4 of Distribution and diversity of ROS-generating enzymes across the animal kingdom, with a focus on sponges (Porifera)

Olivia H. Hewitt & Sandie M. Degnan
Additional file 4. Output from TargetP-2.0 analysis predicting presence of signal peptide target region.

Additional file 5 of Distribution and diversity of ROS-generating enzymes across the animal kingdom, with a focus on sponges (Porifera)

Olivia H. Hewitt & Sandie M. Degnan
Additional file 5. All alignments and original protein sequences used to generate phylogenetic trees.

Supplemental Material, sj-pdf-1-ojs-10.1177_23259671221124141 - Do the General Public and Health Care Professionals Think That Running Is Bad for the Knees? A Cross-sectional International Multilanguage Online Survey

Jean-Francois Esculier, Manuela Besomi, Danilo de Oliveira Silva, Samuele Passigli, Michael Skovdal Rathleff, Marienke Van Middelkoop, Christian Barton, Michael J. Callaghan, Matthew S. Harkey, Alison M. Hoens, Natasha M. Krowchuk, Anthony Teoli, Bill Vicenzino, Richard W. Willy & Michael A. Hunt
Supplemental Material, sj-pdf-1-ojs-10.1177_23259671221124141 for Do the General Public and Health Care Professionals Think That Running Is Bad for the Knees? A Cross-sectional International Multilanguage Online Survey by Jean-Francois Esculier, Manuela Besomi, Danilo de Oliveira Silva, Samuele Passigli, Michael Skovdal Rathleff, Marienke Van Middelkoop, Christian Barton, Michael J. Callaghan, Matthew S. Harkey, Alison M. Hoens, Natasha M. Krowchuk, Anthony Teoli, Bill Vicenzino, Richard W. Willy and Michael A. Hunt in Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine

Additional file 1 of Inconsistency analysis between metagenomic next-generation sequencing results of cerebrospinal fluid and clinical diagnosis with suspected central nervous system infection

Jin Wang, Jun Ye, Liqi Yang, Xiangfeng Chen, Haoshu Fang, Zhou Liu, Guomei Xia, Yafei Zhang & Zhenhua Zhang
Additional file 1: The results of next generation sequencing of cerebrospinal fluid.

Additional file 2 of Inconsistency analysis between metagenomic next-generation sequencing results of cerebrospinal fluid and clinical diagnosis with suspected central nervous system infection

Jin Wang, Jun Ye, Liqi Yang, Xiangfeng Chen, Haoshu Fang, Zhou Liu, Guomei Xia, Yafei Zhang & Zhenhua Zhang
Additional file 2: Comparison of the etiological results between conventional detection methods and next-generation sequencing technology.

Interactions among multiple stressors vary with exposure duration and biological response

Olivia King, Jason Van De Merwe, Max Campbell, Rachael Smith, Michael Warne & Chris Brown
Coastal ecosystems are exposed to multiple anthropogenic stressors. Effective management actions would be better informed from generalised predictions of the individual, combined and interactive effects of multiple stressors; however, few generalities are shared across different meta-analyses. Using an experimental study, we present an approach for analysing regression-based designs with generalised additive models (GAMs) that allowed us to capture non-linear effects of exposure duration and stressor intensity, and access interactions among stressors. We tested the approach...

Suharto's Enablers? Social complicity in the Indonesian killings of 1965-66

Eva Nisa
This projects aims to revolutionise understandings of civilian involvement in the most critical and bloody turning point in modern Indonesian history, the 1965-66 killings, and to transform the evidence base for Indonesian history-writing. By accessing critically endangered and never before used survivor community archives, the project will examine the complicity of civilians in the killings and how the violence shaped modern Indonesian national identity and moral consciousness. It will further generate a new, centralised archive...

Improving genome-wide association discovery and genomic prediction accuracy in biobank data

Matthew Robinson, Etienne J. Orliac, Daniel Trejo Banos, Sven E. Ojavee, Kristi Läll, Reedik Mägi, Peter M. Visscher & Matthew R. Robinson
Genetically informed, deep-phenotyped biobanks are an important research resource and it is imperative that the most powerful, versatile, and efficient analysis approaches are used. Here, we apply our recently developed Bayesian grouped mixture of regressions model (GMRM) in the UK and Estonian Biobanks and obtain the highest genomic prediction accuracy reported to date across 21 heritable traits. When compared to other approaches, GMRM accuracy was greater than annotation prediction models run in the LDAK or...

Registration Year

  • 2022
    63

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    49
  • Collection
    6
  • Text
    6
  • Journal Article
    1
  • Output Management Plan
    1

Affiliations

  • University of Queensland
    63
  • Yunnan University
    6
  • North West Agriculture and Forestry University
    6
  • Sun Yat-sen University
    6
  • West China Hospital of Sichuan University
    6
  • Zhejiang University
    6
  • University of Washington
    6
  • Jiangxi Agricultural University
    6
  • Stanford University
    6
  • Air Force Medical University
    6