236 Works

Hierarchical multi-grain models improve descriptions of species’ environmental associations, distribution, and abundance

Katherine Mertes, Marta Jarzyna & Walter Jetz
The characterization of species’ environmental niches and spatial distribution predictions based on them are now central to much of ecology and conservation, but implicitly requires decisions about the appropriate spatial scale (i.e. grain) of analysis. Ecological theory and empirical evidence suggest that range-resident species respond to their environment at two characteristic, hierarchical spatial grains: (i) response grain, the (relatively fine) grain at which an individual uses environmental resources, and (ii) occupancy grain, the (relatively coarse)...

Evolutionary history of Neotropical savannas geographically concentrates species, phylogenetic and functional diversity of lizards

Jessica Fenker, Fabricius M. C. B. Domingos, Leonardo G. Tedeschi, Dan F. Rosauer, Fernanda P. Werneck, Guarino R. Colli, Roger M. D. Ledo, Emanuel M. Fonseca, Adrian A. Garda, Derek Tucker, , Maria F. Breitman, Flavia Soares, Lilian G. Giugliano & Craig Moritz
Supporting information (scripts) to compute diversity and endemism indices copied and available by Dan Rosauer (https ://github.com/DanRosauer/phylospatial). Aim: Understanding where and why species diversity is geographically concentrated remains a challenge in biogeography and macroevolution. This is true for the Cerrado, the most biodiverse tropical savanna in the world, which has experienced profound biodiversity loss. Previous studies have focused on a single metric (species composition), neglecting the fact that ‘species’ within the biome are often composed...

Clinical recommendations to guide physical therapy practice for Huntington disease

Nora Fritz, Lori Quinn, Deb Kegelmeyer, Anne Kloos, Ashwini Rao & Monica Busse
Objective In the past decade, an increasing number of studies have examined the efficacy of physical therapy interventions in people with Huntington disease (HD). Methods We performed a mixed-methods systematic review using Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) methodology and included experimental and observational study designs. The search resulted in 23 quantitative studies and 3 qualitative studies from which we extracted data using JBI standardized extraction tools. Results of this review suggested that physical therapy interventions may...

Data From: Characterizing patterns of genomic variation in the threatened Utah prairie dog: implications for conservation and management

Rachael Giglio, Tonie Rocke, Jorge Osorio & Emily Latch
Utah prairie dogs (Cynomys parvidens) are federally threatened due to eradication campaigns, habitat destruction, and outbreaks of plague. Today, Utah prairie dogs exist in small, isolated populations, making them less demographically stable and more susceptible to erosion of genetic variation by genetic drift. We characterized patterns of genetic structure at neutral and putatively adaptive loci in order to evaluate the relative effects of genetic drift and local adaptation on population divergence. We sampled individuals across...

Data from: Diversification rates have no effect on the convergent evolution of foraging strategies in the most speciose genus of bats, Myotis

Ariadna E Morales, Manuel Ruedi, Kathryn Field & Bryan C Carstens
Adaptive radiations are defined as rapid diversification with phenotypic innovation led by colonization to new environments. Notably, adaptive radiations can occur in parallel when habitats with similar selective pressures are accessible promoting convergent adaptions. While convergent evolution appears to be a common process, it is unclear what are the main drivers leading the reappearance of morphologies or ecological roles. We explore this question in Myotis bats, the only Chiropteran genus with a worldwide distribution. Three...

Data from: The metabolic cost of changing walking speeds is significant, implies lower optimal speeds for shorter distances, and increases daily energy estimates

Nidhi Seethapathi & Manoj Srinivasan
Humans do not generally walk at constant speed, except perhaps on a treadmill. Normal walking involves starting, stopping and changing speeds, in addition to roughly steady locomotion. Here, we measure the metabolic energy cost of walking when changing speed. Subjects (healthy adults) walked with oscillating speeds on a constant-speed treadmill, alternating between walking slower and faster than the treadmill belt, moving back and forth in the laboratory frame. The metabolic rate for oscillating-speed walking was...

Data from: Distance-dependent seedling mortality and long-term spacing dynamics in a neotropical forest community

Stephen J. Murphy, Thorsten Wiegand & Liza S. Comita
Negative distance dependence (NDisD), or reduced recruitment near adult conspecifics, is thought to explain the astounding diversity of tropical forests. While many studies show greater mortality at near vs. far distances from adults, these studies do not seek to track changes in the peak seedling curve over time, thus limiting our ability to link NDisD to coexistence. Using census data collected over 12 years from central Panama in conjunction with spatial mark-connection functions, we show...

Data from: Combining allele frequency and tree-based approaches improves phylogeographic inference from natural history collections

Megan Ruffley, Megan L. Smith, Anahi Espindola, Bryan C. Carstens, Jack Sullivan & David C. Tank
Model selection approaches in phylogeography have allowed researchers to evaluate the support for competing demographic histories, which provides a mode of inference and a measure of uncertainty in understanding climatic and spatial influences on intraspecific diversity. Here, to rank all models in the comparison set, and determine what proportion of the total support the top-ranked model garners, we conduct model selection using two analytical approaches –allele frequency-based, implemented in fastsimcoal2, and gene tree-based, implemented in...

Data from: Dating the species network: allopolyploidy and repetitive DNA evolution in American daisies (Melampodium sect. Melampodium, Asteraceae)

Jamie McCann, Tae-Soo Jang, Jiri Macas, Gerald M. Schneeweiss, Nicholas J. Matzke, Petr Novak, Tod F. Stuessy, Jose L. Villaseñor & Hanna Weiss-Schneeweiss
Allopolyploidy has played an important role in the evolution of the flowering plants. Genome mergers are often accompanied by significant and rapid alterations of genome size and structure via chromosomal rearrangements and altered dynamics of tandem and dispersed repetitive DNA families. Recent developments in sequencing technologies and bioinformatic methods allow for a comprehensive investigation of the repetitive component of plant genomes. Interpretation of evolutionary dynamics following allopolyploidization requires both the knowledge of parentage and the...

Data from: Propagule pressure and genetic diversity enhance colonization by a ruderal species: a multi-generation field experiment

Stephen M. Hovick & Kenneth D. Whitney
Colonization is a critical filter, setting the stage for short-term and long-term population success. Increased propagule pressure (e.g., more founding individuals) usually enhances colonization; however, this pattern may be driven by purely numeric effects, population genetic diversity effects, or both. To determine the independent and interactive effects of propagule pressure and genetic diversity, we conducted a seed addition experiment in the field using the ruderal annual Arabidopsis thaliana. Propagule pressure treatments spanned five levels, from...

Data from: Primers for Castilleja and their utility across Orobanchaceae: II. Single-copy nuclear loci

Maribeth Latvis, Sarah J. Jacobs, Sebastian M. E. Mortimer, Melissa Richards, Paul D. Blischak, Sarah Mathews & David C. Tank
Premise of the study: We developed primers targeting nuclear loci in Castilleja with the goal of reconstructing the evolutionary history of this challenging clade. These primers were tested across other major clades in Orobanchaceae to assess their broader utility. Methods and Results: We assembled low-coverage genomes for three taxa in Castilleja and developed primer combinations for the single-copy conserved ortholog set (COSII) and the pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) gene family. These primer combinations were designed to...

Data from: Within-group relatedness is correlated with colony-level social structure and reproductive sharing in a social fish.

Jennifer K. Hellmann, Michael G. Sovic, H. Lisle Gibbs, Adam R. Reddon, Constance M. O'Connor, Isaac Y. Ligocki, Susan Marsh-Rollo, Sigal Balshine & Ian M. Hamilton
In group-living species, the degree of relatedness among group members often governs the extent of reproductive sharing, cooperation and conflict within a group. Kinship among group members can be shaped by the presence and location of neighbouring groups, as these provide dispersal or mating opportunities that can dilute kinship among current group members. Here, we assessed how within-group relatedness varies with the density and position of neighbouring social groups in Neolamprologus pulcher, a colonial and...

Data from: Demographic consequences of greater clonal than sexual reproduction in Dicentra canadensis

Chia-Hua Lin, Maria N. Miriti & Karen Goodell
Clonality is a widespread life history trait in flowering plants that may be essential for population persistence, especially in environments where sexual reproduction is unpredictable. Frequent clonal reproduction, however, could hinder sexual reproduction by spatially aggregating ramets that compete with seedlings and reduce inter-genet pollination. Nevertheless, the role of clonality in relation to variable sexual reproduction in population dynamics is often overlooked. We combined population matrix models and pollination experiments to compare the demographic contributions...

Data from: Cryptic sex? Estimates of genome exchange in unisexual mole salamanders (Ambystoma sp.)

H. Lisle Gibbs & Robert D. Denton
Cryptic sex has been argued to explain the exceptional longevity of certain parthenogenetic vertebrate lineages, yet direct measurements of genetic exchange between sexual and apparently parthenogenetic forms are rare. Female unisexual mole salamanders (Ambystoma sp.) are the oldest known unisexual vertebrate lineage (~5 million years), and one hypothesis for their persistence is that allopolyploid female unisexuals periodically exchange haploid genomes ‘genome exchange’ during gynogenetic reproduction with males from sympatric sexual species. We test this hypothesis...

Data from: Phylogeographic concordance factors quantify phylogeographic congruence among co-distributed species in the Sarracenia alata pitcher plant system

Jordan D. Satler & Bryan Charles Carstens
Comparative phylogeographic investigations have identified congruent phylogeographic breaks in co-distributed species in nearly every region of the world. The qualitative assessments of phylogeographic patterns traditionally used to identify such breaks, however, are limited because they rely on identifying monophyletic groups across species and do not account for coalescent stochasticity. Only long-standing phylogeographic breaks are likely to be obvious; many species could have had a concerted response to more recent landscape events, yet possess subtle signs...

Data from: Genomewide genotyping of a novel Mexican Chile Pepper collection illuminates the history of landrace differentiation after Capsicum annuum L. domestication

Nathan Taitano, Vivian Bernau, Lev Jardón-Barbolla, Brian Leckie, Michael Mazourek, Kristin Mercer, Leah McHale, Andrew Michel, David Baumler, Michael Kantar, Esther Van Der Knapp & Esther Van Der Knaap
Studies of genetic diversity among phenotypically distinct crop landraces improve our understanding of fruit evolution and genome structure under domestication. Chile peppers (Capsicum spp. L.) are economically valuable and culturally important species, and extensive phenotypic variation among landraces exists in southern Mexico, a center of C. annuum diversity. We collected 103 chile pepper seed accessions from 22 named landraces across 27 locations in southern Mexico. We genotyped these accessions with genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS), yielding 32,623 filtered...

Data from: Fitness of crop-wild hybrid sunflowers under competitive conditions: implications for crop-to-wild introgression

Kristin L. Mercer, D. Jason Emry, Allison A. Snow, Matthew A. Kost, Brian A. Pace & Helen M. Alexander
Understanding the likelihood and extent of introgression of novel alleles in hybrid zones requires comparison of lifetime fitness of parents and hybrid progeny. However, fitness differences among cross types can vary depending on biotic conditions, thereby influencing introgression patterns. Based on past work, we predicted that increased competition would enhance introgression between cultivated and wild sunflower (Helianthus annuus) by reducing fitness advantages of wild plants. To test this prediction, we established a factorial field experiment...

Data from: Gene prediction and annotation in Penstemon (Plantaginaceae): a workflow for marker development from extremely low-coverage genome sequencing

Paul D. Blischak, Aaron J. Wenzel & Andrea D. Wolfe
Premise of the study: Penstemon (Plantaginaceae) is a large and diverse genus endemic to North America. However, determining the phylogenetic relationships among its 280 species has been difficult due to its recent evolutionary radiation. The development of a large, multilocus data set can help to resolve this challenge. Methods: Using both previously sequenced genomic libraries and our own low-coverage whole-genome shotgun sequencing libraries, we used the MAKER2 Annotation Pipeline to identify gene regions for the...

Data from: Local prey community composition and genetic distance predict venom divergence among populations of the northern Pacific rattlesnake (Crotalus oreganus)

Matthew L. Holding, Mark J. Margres, Darin R. Rokyta, H. Lisa Gibbs & H. Lisle Gibbs
Identifying the environmental correlates of divergence in functional traits between populations can provide insights into the evolutionary mechanisms that generate local adaptation. Here, we assess patterns of population differentiation in expressed venom proteins in Northern Pacific rattlesnakes (Crotalus oreganus) from 13 locations across California. We evaluate the relative importance of major biotic (prey species community composition), abiotic (temperature, precipitation, and elevation) and genetic factors (genetic distance based on RADseq loci) as correlates of population divergence...

Data from: How does human motor cortex regulate vocal pitch in singers?

Michel Belyk, Yune S. Lee & Steven Brown
Vocal pitch is used as an important communicative device by humans, as found in the melodic dimension of both speech and song. Vocal pitch is determined by the degree of tension in the vocal folds of the larynx, which itself is influenced by complex and non-linear interactions among the laryngeal muscles. The relationship between these muscles and vocal pitch has been described by a mathematical model in the form of a set of “control rules”....

Data from: Too constrained to converse: the effect of financial constraints on word-of-mouth

Anna Paley, Stephanie M. Tully & Eesha Sharma
Existing research demonstrates that financial constraints are widespread and influence consumer attention, preference, choice, and consumption in a variety of ways. Despite the growing knowledge of how financial constraints affect the consumer decision making process, less is known about its impact on post-purchase behavior. This work examines whether financial constraints impact an important post-purchase behavior—word-of-mouth—and in what direction. Seven studies show that financial constraints reduce purchase-related word-of-mouth. This effect emerges across consumers’ reported frequencies of...

Data from: Fluidigm2PURC: automated processing and haplotype inference for double-barcoded PCR amplicons

Paul D. Blischak, Maribeth Latvis, Diego F. Morales-Briones, Jens C. Johnson, Verónica S. Di Stilio, Andrea D. Wolfe & David C. Tank
Premise of the Study: Targeted enrichment strategies for phylogenomic inference are a time‐ and cost‐efficient way to collect DNA sequence data for large numbers of individuals at multiple, independent loci. Automated and reproducible processing of these data is a crucial step for researchers conducting phylogenetic studies. Methods and Results: We present Fluidigm2PURC, an open source Python utility for processing paired‐end Illumina data from double‐barcoded PCR amplicons. In combination with the program PURC (Pipeline for Untangling...

Data from: Camerate and disparid crinoids from the late Kinderhookian Meadville Shale, Cuyahoga Formation of Ohio

William I. Ausich & Edgar W. Roeser
Crinoids were first reported from the Cuyahoga Formation in northeastern Ohio by James Hall in 1863. However, these crinoids have essentially not been re-examined in detail since the late 18th century. With the restudy of classical and more recent collections, ten (nine camerate and one disparid) species-level taxa are recognized from the late Kinderhookian Cuyahoga Formation, including the camerates Amphoracrinus viminalis (Hall, 1863); Aorocrinus helice Hall, 1863; Aorocrinus meyeri n. sp.; Aryballocrinus martini n. sp.;...

Data from: Genetic mapping of three quantitative trait loci for soybean aphid resistance in PI 567324

M. A. Rouf Mian, Tae-Hwan Jun & Andy P. Michel
Host-plant resistance is an effective method for controlling soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura), the most damaging insect pest of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) in North America. Recently, resistant soybean lines have been discovered and at least four aphid resistance genes (Rag1, Rag2, Rag3 and rag4) have been mapped on different soybean chromosomes. However, the evolution of new soybean aphid biotypes capable of defeating host-plant resistance conferred by most single genes demonstrates the need for...

Data from: A novel, porcinated human Butyrylcholinesterase catalytically degrades the chemical warfare nerve agent, sarin

Kevin G. McGarry, Remy F. Lalisse, Robert A. Moyer, Kristyn M. Johnson, Alexi M. Tallan, Tyson P. Winters, Craig A. McElroy, Erin E. Lemmon, Hannah S. Shafaat, Sean C. Marguet, Jill A. Harvilchuck, Christopher M. Hadad, David W. Wood & Joseph E. Taris
Chemical warfare nerve agents (CWNAs) present a global threat to both military and civilian populations. The acute toxicity of CWNAs stems from their ability to effectively inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE). This inhibition can lead to uncontrolled cholinergic cellular signaling, resulting in cholinergic crisis and, ultimately, death. While the current FDA-approved standard of care is moderately effective when administered early, development of novel treatment strategies is necessary. Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) is an enzyme which displays a high degree...

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