1,095 Works

Data from: Genetic mapping of three quantitative trait loci for soybean aphid resistance in PI 567324

M. A. Rouf Mian, Tae-Hwan Jun & Andy P. Michel
Host-plant resistance is an effective method for controlling soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura), the most damaging insect pest of soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) in North America. Recently, resistant soybean lines have been discovered and at least four aphid resistance genes (Rag1, Rag2, Rag3 and rag4) have been mapped on different soybean chromosomes. However, the evolution of new soybean aphid biotypes capable of defeating host-plant resistance conferred by most single genes demonstrates the need for...

Data from: Gene prediction and annotation in Penstemon (Plantaginaceae): a workflow for marker development from extremely low-coverage genome sequencing

Paul D. Blischak, Aaron J. Wenzel & Andrea D. Wolfe
Premise of the study: Penstemon (Plantaginaceae) is a large and diverse genus endemic to North America. However, determining the phylogenetic relationships among its 280 species has been difficult due to its recent evolutionary radiation. The development of a large, multilocus data set can help to resolve this challenge. Methods: Using both previously sequenced genomic libraries and our own low-coverage whole-genome shotgun sequencing libraries, we used the MAKER2 Annotation Pipeline to identify gene regions for the...

Data from: Fitness of crop-wild hybrid sunflowers under competitive conditions: implications for crop-to-wild introgression

Kristin L. Mercer, D. Jason Emry, Allison A. Snow, Matthew A. Kost, Brian A. Pace & Helen M. Alexander
Understanding the likelihood and extent of introgression of novel alleles in hybrid zones requires comparison of lifetime fitness of parents and hybrid progeny. However, fitness differences among cross types can vary depending on biotic conditions, thereby influencing introgression patterns. Based on past work, we predicted that increased competition would enhance introgression between cultivated and wild sunflower (Helianthus annuus) by reducing fitness advantages of wild plants. To test this prediction, we established a factorial field experiment...

Data from: Camerate and disparid crinoids from the late Kinderhookian Meadville Shale, Cuyahoga Formation of Ohio

William I. Ausich & Edgar W. Roeser
Crinoids were first reported from the Cuyahoga Formation in northeastern Ohio by James Hall in 1863. However, these crinoids have essentially not been re-examined in detail since the late 18th century. With the restudy of classical and more recent collections, ten (nine camerate and one disparid) species-level taxa are recognized from the late Kinderhookian Cuyahoga Formation, including the camerates Amphoracrinus viminalis (Hall, 1863); Aorocrinus helice Hall, 1863; Aorocrinus meyeri n. sp.; Aryballocrinus martini n. sp.;...

Data from: Phylogeographic concordance factors quantify phylogeographic congruence among co-distributed species in the Sarracenia alata pitcher plant system

Jordan D. Satler & Bryan Charles Carstens
Comparative phylogeographic investigations have identified congruent phylogeographic breaks in co-distributed species in nearly every region of the world. The qualitative assessments of phylogeographic patterns traditionally used to identify such breaks, however, are limited because they rely on identifying monophyletic groups across species and do not account for coalescent stochasticity. Only long-standing phylogeographic breaks are likely to be obvious; many species could have had a concerted response to more recent landscape events, yet possess subtle signs...

Data from: Demographic consequences of greater clonal than sexual reproduction in Dicentra canadensis

Chia-Hua Lin, Maria N. Miriti & Karen Goodell
Clonality is a widespread life history trait in flowering plants that may be essential for population persistence, especially in environments where sexual reproduction is unpredictable. Frequent clonal reproduction, however, could hinder sexual reproduction by spatially aggregating ramets that compete with seedlings and reduce inter-genet pollination. Nevertheless, the role of clonality in relation to variable sexual reproduction in population dynamics is often overlooked. We combined population matrix models and pollination experiments to compare the demographic contributions...

Data from: Cryptic sex? Estimates of genome exchange in unisexual mole salamanders (Ambystoma sp.)

H. Lisle Gibbs & Robert D. Denton
Cryptic sex has been argued to explain the exceptional longevity of certain parthenogenetic vertebrate lineages, yet direct measurements of genetic exchange between sexual and apparently parthenogenetic forms are rare. Female unisexual mole salamanders (Ambystoma sp.) are the oldest known unisexual vertebrate lineage (~5 million years), and one hypothesis for their persistence is that allopolyploid female unisexuals periodically exchange haploid genomes ‘genome exchange’ during gynogenetic reproduction with males from sympatric sexual species. We test this hypothesis...

The interplay of wind and uplift facilitates over-water flight in facultative soaring birds

Elham Nourani, Gil Bohrer, Paolo Becciu, Richard O Bierregaard, Olivier Duriez, Jordi Figuerola, Laura Gangoso, Sinos Giokas, Hiroyoshi Higuchi, Christina Kassara, Olga Kulikova, Nicolas Lecomte, Flavio Monti, Ivan Pokrovsky, Andrea Sforzi, Jean-François Therrien, Nikos Tsiopelas, Wouter MG Vansteelant, Duarte S Viana, Noriyuki M Yamaguchi, Martin Wikelski & Kamran Safi
Flying over the open sea is energetically costly for terrestrial birds. Despite this, over-water journeys of many birds, sometimes hundreds of kilometers long, are uncovered by bio-logging technology. To understand how these birds afford their flights over the open sea, we investigated the role of atmospheric conditions, specifically wind and uplift, in subsidizing over-water flight at the global scale. We first established that ∆T, the temperature difference between sea surface and air, is a meaningful...

Influence of YES1 kinase and tyrosine phosphorylation on the activity of OCT1

Muhammad Erfan Uddin, Dominique Garrison, Kyeongmin Kim, Yan Jin, Eric Eisenmann, Kevin Huang, Alice Gibson, Zeping Hu, Alex Sparreboom & Shuiying Hu
Organic cation transporter 1 (OCT1) is a transporter that regulates the hepatic uptake and subsequent elimination of diverse cationic compounds. Although OCT1 has been involved in drug-drug interactions and causes pharmacokinetic variability of many prescription drugs, details of the molecular mechanisms that regulate the activity of OCT1 remain incompletely understood. Based on an unbiased phospho-proteomics screen, we identified OCT1 as a tyrosine-phosphorylated transporter, and functional validation studies using genetic and pharmacological approaches revealed that OCT1...

Potential local adaptation in populations of invasive reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea) across an urbanization gradient

Stephen Hovick, Leah Weston, Kali Mattingly & Charles Day
Urban stressors represent strong selective gradients that can elicit evolutionary change, especially in non-native species that may harbor substantial within-population variability. To test whether urban stressors drive phenotypic differentiation and influence local adaptation, we compared stress responses of populations of a ubiquitous invader, reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea). Specifically, we quantified responses to salt, copper, and zinc additions by reed canary grass collected from four populations spanning an urbanization gradient (natural, rural, moderate urban and...

An integrated population model to project viability of a northern bobwhite population in Ohio [DATA]

Connor Rosenblatt
Increased variation in interannual weather due to climate change can exert a powerful influence on the population dynamics of a species. Understanding the influence of severe weather is important for managing weather-sensitive species. While best management practices target vital rates that are affected by weather, focusing on a single vital rate may not be sufficient if other vital rates are secondarily limiting. A comprehensive modeling framework to forecast future population dynamics while incorporating weather scenarios...

Phylogeographic analysis of shrubby beardtongues reveals range expansions during the Last Glacial Maximum and implicates the Klamath Mountains as a hotspot for hybridization

Benjamin Stone & Andrea Wolfe
Quaternary glacial cycles often altered species’ geographic distributions, which in turn altered the geographic structure of species’ genetic diversity. In many cases, glacial expansion forced species in temperate climates to contract their ranges and reside in small pockets of suitable habitat (refugia), where they were likely to interact closely with other species, setting the stage for potential gene exchange. These introgression events, in turn, would have degraded species boundaries, making the inference of phylogenetic relationships...

Functional traits reveal the dominant drivers of long‐term community change across a North American Great Lake

James Sinclair, Michael Fraker, James Hood, Kenneth Frank, Mark DuFour, Ann Marie Gorman & Stuart Ludsin
The datasets here were used to determine annual sentinel fish species and trait composition in Lake Erie's western and central basins during 1969-2018 in relation to multiple anthropogenic stressors. Here, we provide three datasets, which are used in the paper by Sinclair et al. titled: "Functional traits reveal the dominant drivers of long-term community change across a North American Great Lake". Each dataset is provided as a separate tab in a single Excel worksheet. The...

Data from: The metabolic cost of changing walking speeds is significant, implies lower optimal speeds for shorter distances, and increases daily energy estimates

Nidhi Seethapathi & Manoj Srinivasan
Humans do not generally walk at constant speed, except perhaps on a treadmill. Normal walking involves starting, stopping and changing speeds, in addition to roughly steady locomotion. Here, we measure the metabolic energy cost of walking when changing speed. Subjects (healthy adults) walked with oscillating speeds on a constant-speed treadmill, alternating between walking slower and faster than the treadmill belt, moving back and forth in the laboratory frame. The metabolic rate for oscillating-speed walking was...

Data from: Bayesian estimation of fossil phylogenies and the evolution of early to middle Paleozoic crinoids (Echinodermata)

David F. Wright
Knowledge of phylogenetic relationships among species is fundamental to understanding basic patterns in evolution and underpins nearly all research programs in biology and paleontology. However, most methods of phylogenetic inference typically used by paleontologists do not accommodate the idiosyncrasies of fossil data and therefore do not take full advantage of the information provided by the fossil record. The advent of Bayesian ‘tip-dating’ approaches to phylogeny estimation is especially promising for paleosystematists because time-stamped comparative data...

Data from: Within-group relatedness is correlated with colony-level social structure and reproductive sharing in a social fish.

Jennifer K. Hellmann, Michael G. Sovic, H. Lisle Gibbs, Adam R. Reddon, Constance M. O'Connor, Isaac Y. Ligocki, Susan Marsh-Rollo, Sigal Balshine & Ian M. Hamilton
In group-living species, the degree of relatedness among group members often governs the extent of reproductive sharing, cooperation and conflict within a group. Kinship among group members can be shaped by the presence and location of neighbouring groups, as these provide dispersal or mating opportunities that can dilute kinship among current group members. Here, we assessed how within-group relatedness varies with the density and position of neighbouring social groups in Neolamprologus pulcher, a colonial and...

Data from: Risk factors for suicidality in Huntington's disease: an analysis of the 2CARE clinical trial

Andrew J. McGarry, Michael P. McDermott, Karl Kieburtz, Wai Lun Alan Fung, Elizabeth Anne McCusker, Jing Peng, Elisabeth A. De Blieck & Merit E. Cudkowicz
Most suicidality literature in HD is based on natural history studies or retrospective reviews, but reports on risk factors from clinical trials are limited. We analyzed 609 participants from 2CARE, a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled clinical trial with up to 5 years of follow-up, for risk factors related to suicidality. The primary outcome variable was the time from randomization until the first occurrence of either suicidal ideation or attempt. We also considered time from randomization...

Data from: Propagule pressure and genetic diversity enhance colonization by a ruderal species: a multi-generation field experiment

Stephen M. Hovick & Kenneth D. Whitney
Colonization is a critical filter, setting the stage for short-term and long-term population success. Increased propagule pressure (e.g., more founding individuals) usually enhances colonization; however, this pattern may be driven by purely numeric effects, population genetic diversity effects, or both. To determine the independent and interactive effects of propagule pressure and genetic diversity, we conducted a seed addition experiment in the field using the ruderal annual Arabidopsis thaliana. Propagule pressure treatments spanned five levels, from...

Data from: Using host-associated differentiation to track source population and dispersal distance among insect vectors of plant pathogens

Gina M. Angelella, Andy P. Michel, Ian Kaplan, G.M. Angelella & A.P. Michel
Small, mobile insects are notoriously challenging to track across landscapes and manage in agricultural fields. However, genetic differentiation among insect populations and host-plants acquired through host-associated differentiation could be exploited to infer movement within crop systems and damage potential. Although many insects exhibit host-associated differentiation, management strategies for insect vectors of plant pathogens assume a homogenous population. Nevertheless, phenotypic changes derived from host-associated differentiation could manifest in altered behavior or physiology affecting the likelihood of...

Data from: Large birds travel farther in homogeneous environments

Marlee A. Tucker, Olga Alexandrou, , Keith L. Bildstein, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, Chloe Bracis, John N. Brzorad, Evan R. Buechley, David Cabot, Justin M. Calabrese, Carlos Carrapato, André Chiaradia, Lisa C. Davenport, Sarah C. Davidson, Mark Desholm, Christopher R. DeSorbo, Robert Domenech, Peter Enggist, William F. Fagan, Nina Farwig, Wolfgang Fiedler, Christen H. Fleming, Alastair Franke, John M. Fryxell, Clara García-Ripollés … & João Paulo Silva
Aim: Animal movement is an important determinant of individual survival, population dynamics, and ecosystem structure and function. Yet it is still unclear how local movements are related to resource availability and the spatial arrangement of resources. Using resident bird species and migratory bird species outside of the migratory period, we examined how the distribution of resources affect the movement patterns of both large terrestrial birds (e.g., raptors, bustards, hornbills) and waterbirds (e.g., cranes, storks, ducks,...

Data from: The Sarracenia alata pitcher plant system and obligate arthropod inquilines should be considered an evolutionary community

Jordan D. Satler & Bryan C. Carstens
Aim: The Sarracenia alata pitcher plant and inquiline species comprise an ecological community. These inquilines span the continuum in their ecological association with the host pitcher plant, from species that contain little-to-no interaction with the plant to species that are completely dependent on the plant for their entire life cycle. We are interested in testing if degree of ecological dependence is positively correlated with a shared evolutionary history, and in identifying members of this community...

Data from: Dating the species network: allopolyploidy and repetitive DNA evolution in American daisies (Melampodium sect. Melampodium, Asteraceae)

Jamie McCann, Tae-Soo Jang, Jiri Macas, Gerald M. Schneeweiss, Nicholas J. Matzke, Petr Novak, Tod F. Stuessy, Jose L. Villaseñor & Hanna Weiss-Schneeweiss
Allopolyploidy has played an important role in the evolution of the flowering plants. Genome mergers are often accompanied by significant and rapid alterations of genome size and structure via chromosomal rearrangements and altered dynamics of tandem and dispersed repetitive DNA families. Recent developments in sequencing technologies and bioinformatic methods allow for a comprehensive investigation of the repetitive component of plant genomes. Interpretation of evolutionary dynamics following allopolyploidization requires both the knowledge of parentage and the...

Data from: Too constrained to converse: the effect of financial constraints on word-of-mouth

Anna Paley, Stephanie M. Tully & Eesha Sharma
Existing research demonstrates that financial constraints are widespread and influence consumer attention, preference, choice, and consumption in a variety of ways. Despite the growing knowledge of how financial constraints affect the consumer decision making process, less is known about its impact on post-purchase behavior. This work examines whether financial constraints impact an important post-purchase behavior—word-of-mouth—and in what direction. Seven studies show that financial constraints reduce purchase-related word-of-mouth. This effect emerges across consumers’ reported frequencies of...

Data from: Genomewide genotyping of a novel Mexican Chile Pepper collection illuminates the history of landrace differentiation after Capsicum annuum L. domestication

Nathan Taitano, Vivian Bernau, Lev Jardón-Barbolla, Brian Leckie, Michael Mazourek, Kristin Mercer, Leah McHale, Andrew Michel, David Baumler, Michael Kantar, Esther Van Der Knapp & Esther Van Der Knaap
Studies of genetic diversity among phenotypically distinct crop landraces improve our understanding of fruit evolution and genome structure under domestication. Chile peppers (Capsicum spp. L.) are economically valuable and culturally important species, and extensive phenotypic variation among landraces exists in southern Mexico, a center of C. annuum diversity. We collected 103 chile pepper seed accessions from 22 named landraces across 27 locations in southern Mexico. We genotyped these accessions with genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS), yielding 32,623 filtered...

Data from: Distance-dependent seedling mortality and long-term spacing dynamics in a neotropical forest community

Stephen J. Murphy, Thorsten Wiegand & Liza S. Comita
Negative distance dependence (NDisD), or reduced recruitment near adult conspecifics, is thought to explain the astounding diversity of tropical forests. While many studies show greater mortality at near vs. far distances from adults, these studies do not seek to track changes in the peak seedling curve over time, thus limiting our ability to link NDisD to coexistence. Using census data collected over 12 years from central Panama in conjunction with spatial mark-connection functions, we show...

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