33 Works

Data from: Migration routes and staging areas of trans-Saharan Turtle Doves appraised from light-level geolocators

Cyril Eraud, Marcel Rivière, Hervé Lormée, James W. Fox, Jean-Jacques Ducamp & Jean-Marie Boutin
The identification of migration routes, wintering grounds and stopover sites are crucial issues for the understanding of the Palearctic-African bird migration system as well as for the development of relevant conservation strategies for trans-Saharan migrants. Using miniaturized light-level geolocators we report a comprehensive and detailed year round track of a granivorous trans-Saharan migrant, the European Turtle Dove (Streptopelia turtur). From five recovered loggers, our data provide new insights on migratory journeys and winter destinations of...

Data from: Genomics detects population structure within and between ocean basins in a circumpolar seabird: the white-chinned petrel

Kalinka Rexer-Huber, Andrew J. Veale, Paulo Catry, Yves Cherel, Ludovic Dutoit, Yasmin Foster, John C. McEwan, Graham C. Parker, Richard A. Phillips, Peter G. Ryan, Andrew J. Stanworth, Tracey Van Stijn, David R. Thompson, Jonathan Waters & Bruce C. Robertson
The Southern Ocean represents a continuous stretch of circumpolar marine habitat, but the potential physical and ecological drivers of evolutionary genetic differentiation across this vast ecosystem remain unclear. We tested for genetic structure across the full circumpolar range of the white-chinned petrel (Procellaria aequinoctialis) to unravel the potential drivers of population differentiation and test alternative population differentiation hypotheses. Following range-wide comprehensive sampling, we applied genomic (genotyping-by-sequencing or GBS; 60,709 loci) and standard mitochondrial-marker approaches (cytochrome...

Configurational crop heterogeneity increases within-field plant diversity

Audrey Alignier, Xavier Solé-Senan, Irene Robleño, Barbara Baraibar, Fahrig Lenore, David Giralt, Nicolas Gross, Jean-Louis Martin, Jordi Recasens, Clelia Sirami, Gavin Siriwardena, Aliette Bosem Baillod, Colette Bertrand, Romain Carrie, Annika Hass, Laura Henckel, Paul Miguet, Isabelle Badenhausser, Jacques Baudry, Gerard Bota, Vincent Bretagnolle, Lluis Brotons, Francoise Burel, François Calatayud, Yann Clough … & Péter Batáry
1. Increasing landscape heterogeneity by restoring semi-natural elements to reverse farmland biodiversity declines is not always economically feasible or acceptable to farmers due to competition for land. We hypothesized that increasing the heterogeneity of the crop mosaic itself, hereafter referred to as crop heterogeneity, can have beneficial effects on within-field plant diversity. 2. Using a unique multi-country dataset from a cross-continent collaborative project covering 1451 agricultural fields within 432 landscapes in Europe and Canada, we...

Data from: A functional diversity approach of crop sequences reveals that weed diversity and abundance show different responses to environmental variability

Lucie Mahaut, Sabrina Gaba & Guillaume Fried
1. Combining several crop species and associated agricultural practices in a crop sequence has the potential to control weed abundance while promoting weed diversity in arable fields. However, how the variability of environmental conditions that arise from crop sequences affects weed diversity and abundance remains poorly understood, with most studies to-date simply opposing weed communities in monoculture and in crop rotation. Here, we describe crop sequences along gradients of disturbance and resource variability using a...

A deep dive into fat: Investigating blubber lipidomics fingerprint of killer whales and humpback whales in northern Norway

Pierre Bories, Audun Rikardsen, Pim Leonards, Aaron Fisk, Sabrina Tartu, Emma Vogel, Jenny Bytingsvik & Pierre Blevin
In cetaceans, blubber is the primary and largest lipid body reservoir. Our current understanding about lipid stores and uses in cetaceans is still limited and most studies only focused on a single narrow snapshot of the lipidome. We documented an extended lipidomics fingerprint in two cetacean species present in northern Norway during wintertime. We were able to detect 817 molecular lipid species in blubber of killer whales (Orcinus orca) and humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae). The...

Supplementary information for integrating sequence capture and restriction-site associated DNA sequencing to resolve recent radiations of Pelagic seabirds

Joan Ferrer-Obiol, Helen F. James, R. Terry Chesser, Vincent Bretagnolle, Jacob González-Solís, Julio Rozas, Marta Riutort & Andreanna J. Welch
The diversification of modern birds has been shaped by a number of radiations. Rapid diversification events make reconstructing the evolutionary relationships among taxa challenging due to the convoluted effects of incomplete lineage sorting (ILS) and introgression. Phylogenomic datasets have the potential to detect patterns of phylogenetic incongruence, and to address their causes. However, the footprints of ILS and introgression on sequence data can vary between different phylogenomic markers at different phylogenetic scales depending on factors...

Data from: Mercury exposure in an endangered seabird: long-term changes and relationships with trophic ecology and breeding success

William Mills, Paco Bustamante, Rona McGill, Orea Anderson, Stuart Bearhop, Yves Cherel, Stephen Votier & Richard Phillips
Mercury (Hg) is an environmental contaminant which, at high concentrations, can negatively influence avian physiology and demography. Albatrosses (Diomedeidae) have higher Hg burdens than all other avian families. Here, we measure total Hg (THg) concentrations of body feathers from adult grey-headed albatrosses (Thalassarche chrysostoma) at South Georgia. Specifically, we: (i) analyse temporal trends at South Georgia (1989–2013) and make comparisons with other breeding populations; (ii) identify factors driving variation in THg concentrations; and, (iii) examine...

High mortality rates in a juvenile free-ranging marine predator and links to dive and forage ability

Sam L Cox, Matthieu Authier, Florian Orgeret, Henri Weimerskirch & Christophe Guinet
1. High juvenile mortality rates are typical of many long-lived marine vertebrate predators. Insufficient development in dive and forage ability are considered key drivers of this. However, direct links to survival outcome are sparse, particularly in free-ranging marine animals that may not return to land. 2. In this study, we conduct exploratory investigations toward early mortality in juvenile southern elephant seals Mirounga leonina. 20 post-weaning pups were equipped with (1) a new generation satellite relay...

Data from: An integrated assessment model of seabird population dynamics: can individual heterogeneity in susceptibility to fishing explain abundance trends in Crozet wandering albatross?

Geoffrey N. Tuck, Robin B. Thomson, Christophe Barbraud, Karine Delord, Maite Louzao, Miguel Herrera & Henri Weimerskirch
1. Seabirds have been incidentally caught in distant-water longline fleets operating in the Southern Ocean since at least the 1970s, and breeding numbers for some populations have shown marked trends of decline and recovery concomitant with longline fishing effort within their distributions. However, lacking is an understanding of how forms of among-individual heterogeneity may interact with fisheries bycatch and influence population dynamics. 2. We develop a model that uses comprehensive data on the spatial and...

Data from: Extreme climate events and individual heterogeneity shape life-history traits and population dynamics

Stéphanie Jenouvrier, Clara Péron & Henri Weimerskirch
Extreme climatic conditions and their ecological impacts are currently emerging as critical features of climate change. We studied extreme sea ice condition (ESIC) and found it impacts both life-history traits and population dynamics of an Antarctic seabird well beyond ordinary variability. The Southern Fulmar (Fulmarus glacialoides) is an ice-dependent seabird, and individuals forage near the ice edge. During an extreme unfavorable year (when sea ice area is reduced and distance between ice edge and colony...

Data from: Intergenerational trade-off for water may induce a mother-offspring conflict in favour of embryos in a viviparous snake

Andréaz Dupoué, François Brischoux, Frédéric Angelier, Dale F. DeNardo, Christian D. Wright & Olivier Lourdais
Parent-offspring conflicts are likely to occur when resources are limiting either at pre- or postnatal stages due to intergenerational trade-offs over resources. Current theory posits that such conflicts may influence the evolution of parental allocation as well as reproductive modes. While energy allocation to the offspring has received considerable attention, the distribution of water – another potentially limited vital resource to both the mother and offspring – and the resulting outcomes remain grossly understudied. Here,...

Data from: Trade-offs in provisioning and stability of ecosystem services in agroecosystems

Daniel Montoya, Bart Haegeman, Sabrina Gaba, Claire De Mazancourt, Vincent Bretagnolle & Michel Loreau
Changes in land use generate trade-offs in the delivery of ecosystem services in agricultural landscapes. However, we know little about how the stability of ecosystem services responds to landscape composition, and what ecological mechanisms underlie these trade-offs. Here, we develop a model to investigate the dynamics of three ecosystem services in intensively-managed agroecosystems, i.e. pollination-independent crop yield, crop pollination, and biodiversity. Our model reveals trade-offs and synergies imposed by landscape composition that affect not only...

Modelled mid-trophic pelagic prey fields improve understanding of marine predator foraging behaviour

David Green, Sophie Bestley, Rowan Trebilco, Stuart Corney, Patrick Lehodey, Clive McMahon, C. Guinet & Mark A. Hindell
Biophysical interactions are influential in determining the scale of key ecological processes within marine ecosystems. For oceanic predators, this means foraging behaviour is influenced by processes shaping the distribution of prey. However, oceanic prey is difficult to observe and its abundance and distribution is regionally generalised. We use a spatiotemporally resolved simulation model to describe mid-trophic prey distribution within the Southern Ocean and demonstrate insights that this modelled prey field provides into the foraging behaviour...

Data from: Multiple aspects of plasticity in clutch size vary among populations of a globally distributed songbird

David F. Westneat, Veronika Bókony, Terry Burke, Olivier Chastel, Henrik Jensen, Thomas Kvalnes, Ádám Z. Lendvai, András Liker, Douglas Mock, Julia Schroeder, P. L. Schwagmeyer, Gabriele Sorci & Ian R. K. Stewart
1. Plasticity in life-history characteristics can influence many ecological and evolutionary phenomena, including how invading organisms cope with novel conditions in new locations or how environmental change affects organisms in native locations. Variation in reaction norm attributes is a critical element to understanding plasticity in life history, yet we know relatively little about the ways in which reaction norms vary within and among populations. 2. We amassed data on clutch size from marked females in...

Data from: Development of flight and foraging behaviour in a juvenile seabird with extreme soaring capacities

Alexandre Corbeau, Aurélien Prudor, Akiko Kato & Henri Weimerskirch
1) The early-life of animals is a period of high mortality, when foraging capacities are assumed to be improved progressively. In birds, this critical period involves the improvement of the flight. How do young birds gain these capacities has rarely been studied in natural conditions especially in seabirds that spend most of their life at sea. 2) We used detailed GPS and body acceleration data on 37 great frigatebirds (Fregata minor), to test the hypothesis...

Coordination in parental effort decreases with age in a long-lived seabird

Samantha Patrick, Alexandre Corbeau, Denis Reale & Henri Weimerskirch
Biparental care is widespread in avian species. Individuals may match the contribution of their partner, resulting in equal parental effort, or may exploit their partner, to minimise their own investment. These two hypotheses have received much theoretical and empirical attention in short-lived species, that change mates between seasons. However, in species with persistent pair bonds, where divorce rate is low and costly, selective pressures are different, as partners share the value of future reproduction. In...

Data from: The effects of food supply on reproductive hormones and timing of reproduction in an income-breeding seabird

Shannon Whelan, Scott A. Hatch, Z. Morgan Benowitz-Fredericks, Charline Parenteau, Olivier Chastel & Kyle Elliott
Current food supply is a major driver of timing of breeding in income-breeding animals, likely because increased net energy balance directly increases reproductive hormones and advances breeding. In capital breeders, increased net energy balance increases energy reserves, which eventually leads to improved reproductive readiness and earlier breeding. To test the hypothesis that phenology of income-breeding birds is independent of energy reserves, we conducted an experiment on food-supplemented (“fed”) and control female black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla)....

Data from: A global perspective on the trophic geography of sharks

Christopher Stephen Bird, Ana Veríssimo, Sarah Magozzi, Kátya G. Abrantes, Alex Aguilar, Hassan Al-Reasi, Adam Barnett, Dana M. Bethea, Gérard Biais, Asuncion Borrell, Marc Bouchoucha, Mariah Boyle, Edward J. Brooks, Juerg Brunnschweiler, Paco Bustamante, Aaron Carlisle, Diana Catarino, Stéphane Caut, Yves Cherel, Tiphaine Chouvelon, Diana Churchill, Javier Ciancio, Julien Claes, Ana Colaço, Dean L. Courtney … & Clive N. Trueman
Sharks are a diverse group of mobile predators that forage across varied spatial scales and have the potential to influence food web dynamics. The ecological consequences of recent declines in shark biomass may extend across broader geographic ranges if shark taxa display common behavioural traits. By tracking the original site of photosynthetic fixation of carbon atoms that were ultimately assimilated into muscle tissues of 5,394 sharks from 114 species, we identify globally consistent biogeographic traits...

Relationships between avian malaria resilience and corticosterone, testosterone and prolactin in a Hawaiian songbird

Gabrielle Names, Jesse Krause, Elizabeth Schultz, Frédéric Angelier, Charline Parenteau, Cécile Ribout, Thomas Hahn & John Wingfield
Glucocorticoids, androgens, and prolactin regulate metabolism and reproduction, but they also play critical roles in immunomodulation. Since the introduction of avian malaria to Hawaii a century ago, low elevation populations of the Hawaii Amakihi (Chlorodrepanis virens) that have experienced strong selection by avian malaria have evolved increased resilience (the ability to recover from infection), while high elevation populations that have undergone weak selection remain less resilient. We investigated how variation in malaria selection has affected...

Data for: Modeling short-term energetic costs of sonar disturbance to cetaceans using high resolution foraging data

Max Czapanskiy, Matthew Savoca, William Gough, Paolo Segre, Danuta Wisniewska, David Cade & Jeremy Goldbogen
Anthropogenic noise is a pervasive and increasing source of disturbance to wildlife. Marine mammals exhibit behavioral and physiological responses to naval sonar and other sound sources. The lost foraging opportunities and elevated locomotor effort associated with sonar disturbance likely carry energetic costs, which may lead to population-level consequences. We modeled the energetic costs associated with behavioral responses using (1) empirical datasets of cetacean feeding rates and prey characteristics and (2) allometry of swimming performance and...

Data from: Postglacial recolonisation in a cold climate specialist in Western Europe: patterns of genetic diversity in the adder (Vipera berus) support the central-marginal hypothesis

Sylvain Ursenbacher, Michaël Guillon, Hervé Cubizolle, Andréaz Dupoué, Gabriel Blouin-Demers & Olivier Lourdais
Understanding the impact of postglacial recolonization on genetic diversity is essential in explaining current patterns of genetic variation. The central–marginal hypothesis (CMH) predicts a reduction in genetic diversity from the core of the distribution to peripheral populations, as well as reduced connectivity between peripheral populations. While the CMH has received considerable empirical support, its broad applicability is still debated and alternative hypotheses predict different spatial patterns of genetic diversity. Using microsatellite markers, we analysed the...

Data from: Bottom time does not always predict prey encounter rate in Antarctic fur seals

Morgane Viviant, Tiphaine Jeanniard-Du-Dot, Pascal Monestiez, Matthieu Authier, Christophe Guinet & Tiphaine Jeanniard Dudot
Optimal foraging models applied to breath-holding divers predict that diving predators should optimize the time spent foraging at the bottom of dives depending on prey encounter rate, distance to prey patch (depth) and physiological constraints. We tested this hypothesis on a free-ranging diving marine predator, the Antarctic fur seal Arctocephalus gazella, equipped with accelerometers or Hall sensors (n = 11) that recorded mouth-opening events, a proxy for prey capture attempts and thus feeding events. Over...

Westland petrel data combined GPS and accelerometer data 2016 & 2017

Timothee Poupart, Susan Waugh, Akiko Kato & John Arnould
This study investigated the foraging niche of dimorphic males and females Westland petrel during the chick-rearing period. At-sea movements were recorded with GPS, behaviours and foraging behaviour were recorded with accelerometers, and trophic niche was inferred with stable isotopes (carbon, nitrogen). Altogether, these fine-scale data allowed to look at the foraging niche used by males and females.

A framework for mapping the distribution of seabirds by integrating tracking, demography and phenology

Ana P. B. Carneiro, Elizabeth J. Pearmain, Steffen Oppel, Thomas A. Clay, Richard A. Phillips, Anne-Sophie Bonnet-Lebrun, Ross M. Wanless, Edward Abraham, Yvan Richard, Joel Rice, Jonathan Handley, Tammy E. Davies, Ben J. Dilley, Peter G. Ryan, Cleo Small, Javier Arata, John P. Y. Arnould, Elizabeth Bell, Leandro Bugoni, Letizia Campioni, Paulo Catry, Jaimie Cleeland, Lorna Deppe, Graeme Elliott, Amanda Freeman … & Maria P. Dias
1. The identification of geographic areas where the densities of animals are highest across their annual cycles is a crucial step in conservation planning. In marine environments, however, it can be particularly difficult to map the distribution of species, and the methods used are usually biased towards adults, neglecting the distribution of other life-history stages even though they can represent a substantial proportion of the total population. 2. Here we develop a methodological framework for...

Personality predicts foraging site fidelity and trip repeatability in a marine predator

Stephanie M. Harris, Sébastien Descamps, Lynne U. Sneddon, Philip Bertrand, Olivier Chastel & Samantha C. Patrick
1. Animal populations are often comprised of both foraging specialists and generalists. For instance, some individuals show higher foraging site fidelity (spatial specialisation) than others. Such individual differences in degree of specialisation can persist over timescales of months or even years in long-lived animals, but the mechanisms leading to these different individual strategies are not fully understood. 2. There is accumulating evidence that individual variation in foraging behaviour is shaped by animal personality traits, such...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    4
  • 2020
    10
  • 2019
    7
  • 2017
    2
  • 2016
    1
  • 2015
    5
  • 2014
    2
  • 2013
    2

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    33

Affiliations

  • Centre d'Etudes Biologiques de Chizé
    33
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    8
  • University of Barcelona
    4
  • British Antarctic Survey
    3
  • Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
    3
  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    2
  • Stanford University
    2
  • LIttoral, ENvironment and Societies
    2
  • University of Windsor
    2
  • University of Otago
    2