58 Works

Data from: Vitellogenin and vitellogenin receptor gene expression is associated with male and female parenting in a subsocial insect

Eileen M. Roy-Zokan, Christopher B. Cunningham, Lauren E. Hebb, Elizabeth C. McKinney & Allen J. Moore
Complex social behaviour in Hymenoptera has been hypothesized to evolve by co-opting reproductive pathways (the ovarian ground plan hypothesis, OGPH) and gene networks (the reproductive ground plan hypothesis, RGPH). In support of these hypotheses, in eusocial Hymenoptera where there is reproductive division of labour, the yolk precursor protein vitellogenin (Vg) influences the expression of worker social behaviour. We suggest that co-opting genes involved in reproduction may occur more generally than just in the evolution of...

Data from: Sex-biased gene expression in dioecious garden asparagus (Asparagus officinalis)

Alex Harkess, Francesco Mercati, Hong-Yan Shan, Francesco Sunseri, Agostino Falavigna & Jim Leebens-Mack
Sex chromosomes have evolved independently in phylogenetically diverse flowering plant lineages. The genes governing sex determination in dioecious species remain unknown, but theory predicts that the linkage of genes influencing male and female function will spur the origin and early evolution of sex chromosomes. For example, in an XY system, the origin of an active Y may be spurred by the linkage of female suppressing and male promoting genes. Garden asparagus (Asparagus officinalis) serves as...

Data from: Resolving phylogenetic relationships of the recently radiated carnivorous plant genus Sarracenia using target enrichment

Jessica D. Stephens, Willie L. Rogers, Karolina Heyduk, Jennifer M. Cruse-Sanders, Ron O. Determann, Travis C. Glenn & Russell L. Malmberg
The North American carnivorous pitcher plant genus Sarracenia (Sarraceniaceae) is a relatively young clade (<3 million years ago) displaying a wide range of morphological diversity in complex trapping structures. This recently radiated group is a promising system to examine the structural evolution and diversification of carnivorous plants; however, little is known regarding evolutionary relationships within the genus. Previous attempts at resolving the phylogeny have been unsuccessful, most likely due to few parsimony-informative sites compounded by...

Data from: A combined parasitological-molecular approach for non-invasive characterization of parasitic nematode communities in wild hosts

Sarah A. Budischak, Eric P. Hoberg, Art Abrams, Anna E. Jolles & Vanessa O. Ezenwa
Most hosts are concurrently or sequentially infected with multiple parasites; thus, fully understanding interactions between individual parasite species and their hosts depends on accurate characterization of the parasite community. For parasitic nematodes, noninvasive methods for obtaining quantitative, species-specific infection data in wildlife are often unreliable. Consequently, characterization of gastrointestinal nematode communities of wild hosts has largely relied on lethal sampling to isolate and enumerate adult worms directly from the tissues of dead hosts. The necessity...

Data from: Impacts of degraded DNA on restriction enzyme associated DNA sequencing (RADSeq)

Carly F. Graham, Travis C. Glenn, Andrew G. McArthur, Douglas R. Boreham, Troy Kieran, Stacey Lance, Richard G. Manzon, Jessica A. Martino, Todd Pierson, Sean M. Rogers, Joanna Y. Wilson & Christopher M. Somers
Degraded DNA from suboptimal field sampling is common in molecular ecology. However, its impact on techniques that use restriction site associated next-generation DNA sequencing (RADSeq, GBS) is unknown. We experimentally examined the effects of in situDNA degradation on data generation for a modified double-digest RADSeq approach (3RAD). We generated libraries using genomic DNA serially extracted from the muscle tissue of 8 individual lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) following 0-, 12-, 48- and 96-h incubation at room...

Data from: Experimental studies of adaptation in Clarkia xantiana. III. Phenotypic selection across a subspecies border

Jill Theresa Anderson, Vincent M. Eckhart & Monica Ann Geber
Sister taxa with distinct phenotypes often occupy contrasting environments in parapatric ranges, yet we generally do not know whether trait divergence reflects spatially-varying selection. We conducted a reciprocal transplant experiment to test whether selection favors “native phenotypes” in two subspecies of Clarkia xantiana (Onagraceae), an annual plant in California. For four quantitative traits that differ between subspecies, we estimated phenotypic selection in subspecies’ exclusive ranges and their contact zone in two consecutive years. We predicted...

Data from: Gas exchange and leaf anatomy of a C3-CAM hybrid, Yucca gloriosa (Asparagaceae)

Karolina Heyduk, Nia Burrell, Falak Lalani & Jim Leebens-Mack
While the majority of plants use the typical C3 carbon metabolic pathway, ~6% of angiosperms have adapted to carbon limitation as a result of water stress by employing a modified form of photosynthesis known as Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM). CAM plants concentrate carbon in the cells by temporally separating atmospheric carbon acquisition from fixation into carbohydrates. CAM has been studied for decades, but the evolutionary progression from C3 to CAM remains obscure. In order to...

Data from: Phylogenetic patterns of codon evolution in the actin-depolymerizing factor/cofilin (adf/cfl) gene family

Eileen M. Roy-Zokan, Kelly A. Dyer & Richard B. Meagher
The actin-depolymerizing factor/cofilin (ADF/CFL) gene family encodes a diverse group of relatively small proteins. Once known strictly as modulators of actin filament dynamics, recent research has demonstrated that these proteins are involved in a variety of cellular processes, from signal transduction to the cytonuclear trafficking of actin. In both plant and animal lineages, expression patterns of paralogs in the ADF/CFL gene family vary among tissue types and developmental stages. In this study we use computational...

Data from: Large wildlife removal drives immune defense increases in rodents

Hillary S. Young, Rodolfo Dirzo, Kristofer M. Helgen, Douglas J. McCauley, Charles L. Nunn, Paul Snyder, Kari E. Veblen, Serena Zhao & Vanessa O. Ezenwa
Anthropogenic disturbances involving land use change, climate disruption, pollution, and invasive species have been shown to impact immune function of wild animals. These immune changes have direct impacts on the fitness of impacted animals and, also, potentially indirect effects on other species and on ecological processes, notably involving the spread of infectious disease. Here, we investigate whether the selective loss of large wildlife can also drive changes in immune function of other consumer species. Using...

Data from: Biotic invasion, niche stability, and the assembly of regional biotas in deep time: comparison between faunal provinces

Mark E. Patzkowsky & Steven M. Holland
Biotic invasions in the fossil record provide natural experiments for testing hypotheses of niche stability, speciation, and the assembly and diversity of regional biotas. We compare ecologic parameters (preferred environment, occupancy, median abundance, rank abundance) of genera shared between faunal provinces during the Richmondian Biotic Invasion in the Late Ordovician on the Laurentian continent. Genera that spread from one faunal province to the other during the invasion (invading shared genera) have high Spearman rank correlations...

Data from: Immune response and insulin signalling alter mosquito feeding behaviour to enhance malaria transmission potential

Jose E. Pietri, Lauren J. Cator, Courtney C. Murdock, Johanna R. Ohm, Edwin E. Lews, Andrew F. Read, Shirley Luckhart & Matthew B. Thomas
Malaria parasites alter mosquito feeding behaviour in a way that enhances parasite transmission. This is widely considered a prime example of manipulation of host behaviour to increase onward transmission, but transient immune challenge in the absence of parasites can induce the same behavioural phenotype. Here, we show that alterations in feeding behaviour depend on the timing and dose of immune challenge relative to blood ingestion and that these changes are functionally linked to changes in...

Data from: Phylogenomic analyses of Sabal (Arecaceae) species relationships using targeted sequence capture

Karolina Heyduk, Dorset W. Trapnell, Craig F. Barrett & Jim Leebens-Mack
With the increasing availability of high-throughput sequencing, phylogenetic analyses are no longer constrained by the limited availability of a few loci. Here, we describe a sequence capture methodology, which we used to collect data for analyses of diversification within Sabal (Arecaceae), a palm genus native to the south-eastern USA, Caribbean, Bermuda and Central America. RNA probes were developed and used to enrich DNA samples for putatively low copy nuclear genes and the plastomes for all...

Data from: Rodent reservoirs of future zoonotic diseases

Barbara A. Han, John Paul Schmidt, Sarah E. Bowden & John M. Drake
Forecasting reservoirs of zoonotic disease is a pressing public health priority. We apply machine learning to datasets describing the biological, ecological, and life history traits of rodents, which collectively carry a disproportionate number of zoonotic pathogens. We identify particular rodent species predicted to be novel zoonotic reservoirs and geographic regions from which new emerging pathogens are most likely to arise. We also describe trait profiles—complexes of biological features—that distinguish reservoirs from nonreservoirs. Generally, the most...

Data from: Maternal effects and maternal selection arising from variation in allocation of free amino acid to eggs

Devi Newcombe, John Hunt, Christopher Mitchell & Allen J. Moore
Maternal provisioning can have profound effects on offspring phenotypes, or maternal effects, especially early in life. One ubiquitous form of provisioning is in the makeup of egg. However, only a few studies examine the role of specific egg constituents in maternal effects, especially as they relate to maternal selection (a standardized selection gradient reflecting the covariance between maternal traits and offspring fitness). Here, we report on the evolutionary consequences of differences in maternal acquisition and...

Data from: Orchid phylogenomics and multiple drivers of their extraordinary diversification

Thomas J. Givnish, Daniel Spalink, Mercedes Ames, Stephanie P. Lyon, Steven J. Hunter, Alejandro Zuluaga, William J. D. Iles, Mark A. Clements, Mary T. K. Arroyo, James Leebens-Mack, Lorena Endara, Ricardo Kriebel, Kurt M. Neubig, W. Mark Whitten, Norris H. Williams & Kenneth M. Cameron
Orchids are the most diverse family of angiosperms, with over 25 000 species, more than mammals, birds and reptiles combined. Tests of hypotheses to account for such diversity have been stymied by the lack of a fully resolved broad-scale phylogeny. Here, we provide such a phylogeny, based on 75 chloroplast genes for 39 species representing all orchid subfamilies and 16 of 17 tribes, time-calibrated against 17 angiosperm fossils. A supermatrix analysis places an additional 144...

Data from: Reproductive character displacement of female mate preferences for male cuticular hydrocarbons in Drosophila subquinaria

Howard D. Rundle & Kelly A. Dyer
Several lines of evidence implicate sexual isolation in both initiating and completing the speciation process. While its existence is straightforward to demonstrate, understanding the evolution of sexual isolation requires identifying the underlying phenotypes responsible so that we can determine how these have diverged. Here we study geographic variation in female mate preferences for male sexual displays in the fly Drosophila subquinaria. Female D. subquinaria that are sympatric with its sister species D. recens discriminate strongly...

Data from: Variation in opsin genes correlates with signaling ecology in North American fireflies

Sarah E. Sander & David W. Hall
Genes underlying signal reception should evolve to maximize signal detection in a particular environment. In animals, opsins, the protein component of visual pigments, are predicted to evolve according to this expectation. Fireflies are known for their bioluminescent mating signals. The eyes of nocturnal species are expected to maximize the detection of conspecific signal colours emitted in the typical low-light environment. This is not expected for species that have transitioned to diurnal activity in bright daytime...

Data from: Changes in data sharing and data reuse practices and perceptions among scientists worldwide

Carol Tenopir, Elizabeth D. Dalton, Suzie Allard, Mike Frame, Ivanka Pjesivac, Ben Birch, Danielle Pollock & Kristina Dorsett
The incorporation of data sharing into the research lifecycle is an important part of modern scholarly debate. In this study, the DataONE Usability and Assessment working group addresses two primary goals: To examine the current state of data sharing and reuse perceptions and practices among research scientists as they compare to the 2009/2010 baseline study, and to examine differences in practices and perceptions across age groups, geographic regions, and subject disciplines. We distributed surveys to...

Data from: The effect of hydroperiod and predation on the diversity of temporary pond zooplankton communities

Marcus Zokan & John M. Drake
In temporary pond ecosystems, it is hypothesized that the two dominant structuring forces on zooplankton communities are predation and demographic constraints due to wetland drying. Both of these forces are deterministic processes that act most strongly at opposing ends of a hydroperiod gradient. Our objective was to test how these two processes affect α- and β-diversity of zooplankton communities derived from a diverse temporary pond system. We hypothesized that decreased hydroperiod length and the presence...

Data from: Controlled measurement and comparative analysis of cellular components in E. coli reveals broad regulatory changes in response to glucose starvation

John R. Houser, Craig Barnhart, Daniel R. Boutz, Sean M. Carrol, Aurko Dasgupta, Joshua K. Michener, Brittany D. Needham, Ophelia Papoulas, Viswanadham Sridhara, Dariya K. Sydykova, Christopher J. Marx, M. Stephen Trent, Jeffery E. Barrick, Edward M. Marcotte, Claus O. Wilke, Jeffrey E. Barrick & Sean M. Carroll
How do bacteria regulate their cellular physiology in response to starvation? Here, we present a detailed characterization of Escherichia coli growth and starvation over a time-course lasting two weeks. We have measured multiple cellular components, including RNA and proteins at deep genomic coverage, as well as lipid modifications and flux through central metabolism. Our study focuses on the physiological response of E. coli in stationary phase as a result of being starved for glucose, not...

Data from: Transcriptomes of parents identify parenting strategies and sexual conflict in a subsocial beetle

Darren J. Parker, Christopher B. Cunningham, Craig A. Walling, Clare E. Stamper, Megan L. Head, Eileen M. Roy-Zokan, Elizabeth C. McKinney, Michael G. Ritchie & Allen J. Moore
Parenting in the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides is complex and, unusually, the sex and number of parents that can be present is flexible. Such flexibility is expected to involve specialized behaviour by the two sexes under biparental conditions. Here, we show that offspring fare equally well regardless of the sex or number of parents present. Comparing transcriptomes, we find a largely overlapping set of differentially expressed genes in both uniparental and biparental females and in...

Data from: Demography, traits, and vulnerability to urbanization: can we make generalizations?

Leone M. Brown & Catherine H. Graham
1. Human-induced land cover change threatens species diversity and ecosystem services. The rapid pace of current change makes predicting species’ declines imperative, but leaves little time for thorough study of all species. One solution is to make generalizations about species’ vulnerability to urbanization based on traits common among studied species in decline. 2. To date, most generalizations about traits associated with species’ declines in response to urbanization are based on presence or abundance, or detailed...

Data from: Macroevolution of leaf defenses and secondary metabolites across the genus Helianthus

Chase M. Mason, Alan W. Bowsher, Breanna L. Crowell, Rhodesia M. Celoy, Chung-Jui Tsai & Lisa A. Donovan
Leaf defenses are widely recognized as key adaptations and drivers of plant evolution. Across environmentally diverse habitats, the macroevolution of leaf defenses can be predicted by the univariate trade-off model, which predicts that defenses are functionally redundant and thus trade off, and the resource availability hypothesis, which predicts that defense investment is determined by inherent growth rate and that higher defense will evolve in lower resource environments. Here, we examined the evolution of leaf physical...

Data from: Costs of resistance and infection by a generalist pathogen

Tad Dallas, Mathieu Holtackers & John M. Drake
Pathogen infection is typically costly to hosts, resulting in reduced fitness. However, pathogen exposure may also come at a cost even if the host does not become infected. These fitness reductions, referred to as “resistance costs”, are inducible physiological costs expressed as a result of a trade-off between resistance to a pathogen and aspects of host fitness (e.g., reproduction). Here, we examine resistance and infection costs of a generalist fungal pathogen (Metschnikowia bicuspidata) capable of...

Data from: Kinship, inbreeding, and fine-scale spatial structure influence gut microbiota in a hindgut-fermenting tortoise

Michael L. Yuan, Samantha H. Dean, Ana V. Longo Berrios, Betsie B. Rothermel, Tracey D. Tuberville, Kelly R. Zamudio & Ana V. Longo
Herbivorous vertebrates rely on complex communities of mutualistic gut bacteria to facilitate the digestion of celluloses and hemicelluloses. Gut microbes are often convergent based on diet and gut morphology across a phylogenetically diverse group of mammals. However, little is known about microbial communities of herbivorous hindgut-fermenting reptiles. Here, we investigate how factors at the individual level might constrain the composition of gut microbes in an obligate herbivorous reptile. Using multiplexed 16S rRNA gene sequencing, we...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    58

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    58

Affiliations

  • University of Georgia
    58
  • University of Exeter
    5
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    3
  • Oregon State University
    3
  • Cornell University
    3
  • The University of Texas at Austin
    2
  • University of California System
    2
  • Duke University
    2
  • Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies
    2
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    2