57 Works

Data from: A resurrection experiment finds evidence of both reduced genetic diversity and potential adaptive evolution in the agricultural weed Ipomoea purpurea

Adam Kuester, Ariana Wilson, Shu-Mei Chang & Regina S. Baucom
Despite the negative economic and ecological impact of weeds, relatively little is known about the evolutionary mechanisms that influence their persistence in agricultural fields. Here, we use a resurrection approach to examine the potential for genotypic and phenotypic evolution in Ipomoea purpurea, an agricultural weed that is resistant to glyphosate, the most widely used herbicide in current-day agriculture. We found striking reductions in allelic diversity between cohorts sampled nine years apart (2003 vs. 2012), suggesting...

Data from: Biparental care is predominant and beneficial to parents in the burying beetle Nicrophorus orbicollis (Coleoptera: Silphidae)

Kyle M. Benowitz & Allen J. Moore
Parenting strategies can be flexible within a species and may have varying fitness effects. Understanding this flexibility and its fitness consequences is important for understanding why parenting strategies evolve. In the present study, we investigate the fitness consequences of flexible parenting in the burying beetle Nicrophorus orbicollis, a species known for its advanced provisioning behaviour of regurgitated vertebrate carrion to offspring by both sexes. We show that, even when a parent is freely allowed to...

Data from: Stability and generalization in seed dispersal networks: a case study of frugivorous fish in Neotropical wetlands

Sandra Bibiana Correa, Joisiane K. Araujo, Jerry Penha, Catia Nunes Da Cunha, Karen E. Bobier, Jill T. Anderson & Joisiane K. Arujo
When species within guilds perform similar ecological roles, functional redundancy can buffer ecosystems against species loss. Using data on the frequency of interactions between fish and fruit, we assessed whether co-occurring frugivores provide redundant seed dispersal services in three species-rich Neotropical wetlands. Our study revealed that frugivorous fishes have generalized diets; however, large-bodied fishes had greater seed dispersal breadth than small species, in some cases, providing seed dispersal services not achieved by smaller fish species....

Data from: Experimental insight into the process of parasite community assembly

Sarah A. Budischak, Eric P. Hoberg, Art Abrams, Anna E. Jolles & Vanessa O. Ezenwa
1.Community assembly is a fundamental process that has long been a central focus in ecology. Extending community assembly theory to communities of co-infecting parasites, we used a gastrointestinal nematode removal experiment in free-ranging African buffalo to examine community assembly patterns and processes. 2.We first asked whether reassembled communities differ from undisturbed communities by comparing anthelmintic-treated and control hosts. Next, we examined the temporal dynamics of assembly using a cross-section of communities that reassembled for different...

Data from: A cross-continental comparison of plant and beetle responses to retention of forest patches during timber harvest

Susan C. Baker, Charles B. Halpern, Timothy J. Wardlaw, Christel Kern, Graham J. Edgar, Russell J. Thomson, Richard E. Bigley, Jerry F. Franklin, Kamal J.K. Gandhi, Lena Gustafsson, Samuel Johnson, Brian J. Palik, Thomas A. Spies, E. Ashley Steel, Jan Weslien, Joachim Strengbom & Kamal J. K. Gandhi
Timber harvest can adversely affect forest biota. Recent research and application suggest that retention of mature forest elements (‘retention forestry’), including unharvested patches (or ‘aggregates’) within larger harvested units, can benefit biodiversity compared to clearcutting. However, it is unclear whether these benefits can be generalized among the diverse taxa and biomes in which retention forestry is practiced. Lack of comparability in methods for sampling and analysing responses to timber harvest and edge creation presents a...

Data from: Genetic by environmental variation but no local adaptation in oysters (Crassostrea virginica)

A. Randall Hughes, Torrance C. Hanley, James E. Byers, Jonathan H. Grabowski, Jennafer C. Malek, Micahel F. Piehler, David L. Kimbro & Michael F. Piehler
Functional trait variation within and across populations can strongly influence population, community, and ecosystem processes, but the relative contributions of genetic vs. environmental factors to this variation are often not clear, potentially complicating conservation and restoration efforts. For example, local adaptation, a particular type of genetic by environmental (G*E) interaction in which the fitness of a population in its own habitat is greater than in other habitats, is often invoked in management practices, even in...

Data from: Retrotransposon proliferation coincident with the evolution of dioecy in asparagus

Alex Harkess, Francesco Mercati, Loredana Abbate, Michael McKain, J. Chris Pires, Tea Sala, Francesco Sunseri, Agostino Falavigna & Jim Leebens-Mack
Current phylogenetic sampling reveals that dioecy and an XY sex chromosome pair evolved once or possibly twice in the genus Asparagus. Although there appear to be some lineage-specific polyploidization events, the base chromosome number of 2n=2x=20 is relatively conserved across the Asparagus genus. Regardless, dioecious species tend to have larger genomes than hermaphroditic species. Here we test whether this genome size expansion in dioecious species is related to a polyploidization and subsequent chromosome fusion or...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    57

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    57

Affiliations

  • University of Georgia
    57
  • Donald Danforth Plant Science Center
    4
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    4
  • University of Missouri
    4
  • Oregon State University
    3
  • University of North Carolina
    2
  • University of Alberta
    2
  • Australian National University
    2
  • United States Department of Agriculture
    2
  • University of Tasmania
    2