68 Works

Data from: Pliant pathogens: Estimating viral spread when confronted with new vector, host, and environmental conditions

Anita Krause, Eric Seabloom, Elizabeth Borer, Lauren Shoemaker, Andrew Sieben, Ryan Campbell, Alexander Strauss & Allison Shaw
Pathogen spread rates are determined, in part, by the performance of pathogens under altered environmental conditions and their ability to persist while switching among hosts and vectors. To determine the effects of new conditions (host, vector, and nutrient) on pathogen spread rate, we introduced a vector-borne, viral plant pathogen, Barley Yellow Dwarf Virus PAV (BYDV-PAV) into hosts, vectors, and host nutrient supplies that it had not encountered for thousands of viral generations. We quantified pathogen...

Leadership Outcomes Based on Membership in Multicultural Greek Council (Mgc) Organizations

Eric Atkinson, Laura A. Dean & Michelle M. Espino

Co-infection best predicts respiratory viral infection in a wild host

Caroline Glidden, Courtney Coon, Brianna Beechler, Chase McNulty, Vanessa Ezenwa & Anna Jolles
1) The dynamics of directly transmitted pathogens in natural populations are likely to result from the combined effects of host traits, pathogen biology and interactions among pathogens within a host. Discovering how these factors work in concert to shape variation in pathogen dynamics in natural host – multi‐pathogen systems is fundamental to understanding population health. 2) Here, we describe temporal variation in incidence and then elucidate the effect of hosts trait, season, and pathogen co‐occurrence...

Data from: Assessing biological factors affecting post-speciation introgression

Jennafer Hamlin, Mark Hibbins & Leonie Moyle
An increasing number of phylogenomic studies have documented a clear ‘footprint’ of post-speciation introgression among closely-related species. Nonetheless, systematic genome-wide studies of factors that determine the likelihood of introgression remain rare. Here, we propose an a priori hypothesis-testing framework that uses introgression statistics—including a new metric of estimated introgression, Dp —to evaluate general patterns of introgression prevalence and direction across multiple closely related species. We demonstrate this approach using whole genome sequences from 32 lineages...

Herbicide, fertilization, and planting density effects on intensively managed loblolly pine early stand development

Gabriel Ferreira, Benjamin Rau & Doug Aubrey
Production forestry in the southeast US has been partially transitioned to intensively managed short rotations (~10 years), in which multiple silvicultural interventions are performed during forest development. Understanding the responses to silvicultural practices and continued refinement of site-specific recommendations is critical to sustainably maximize forest production. We evaluated the effects of silvicultural practices (herbicide, fertilization, and planting density) on growth, stand homogeneity, and above- and belowground biomass accumulation and partitioning of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda)...

Divergence, gene flow, and speciation in eight lineages of trans-Beringian birds

Kevin Winker, Jessica McLaughlin, Travis Glenn & Brant Faircloth
Determining how genetic diversity is structured between populations that span the divergence continuum from populations to biological species is key to understanding the generation and maintenance of biodiversity. We investigated genetic divergence and gene flow in eight lineages of birds with a trans-Beringian distribution, where Asian and North American populations have likely been split and reunited through multiple Pleistocene glacial cycles. Our study transects the speciation process, including eight pairwise comparisons in three orders (ducks,...

Latitudinal gradients in population growth do not reflect demographic responses to climate

Megan Peterson, Graham Bailes, Lauren Hendricks, Laurel Pfeifer-Meister, Paul Reed, Scott Bridgham, Bart Johnson, Robert Shriver, Ellen Waddle, Hannah Wroton, Daniel Doak, Bitty Roy & William Morris
Spatial gradients in population growth, such as across latitudinal or elevational gradients, are often assumed to primarily be driven by variation in climate, and are frequently used to infer species’ responses to climate change. Here, we use a novel demographic, mixed model approach to dissect the contributions of climate variables vs. other latitudinal or local site effects on spatiotemporal variation in population performance in three perennial bunchgrasses. For all three species, we find that performance...

The target of selection matters: an established resistance – development-time negative genetic trade-off is not found when selecting on development time.

Lewis Bartlett, Elisa Visher, Yazmin Haro, Katherine Roberts & Mike Boots
Trade-offs are fundamental to evolutionary outcomes and play a central role in eco-evolutionary theory. They are often examined by experimentally selecting on one life-history trait and looking for negative correlations in other traits. For example, populations of the moth Plodia interpunctella selected to resist viral infection show a life-history cost with longer development times. However, we rarely examine whether the detection of such negative genetic correlations depends on the trait on which we select. Here...

Autopolyploidy-driven range expansion of a temperate-originated plant to pan-tropic under global change

Jiliang Cheng, Jun Li, Zheng Zhang, Huan Lu, Guoqi Chen, Beibei Yao, Yingxue Dong, Ling Ma, Xiaoxiao Yuan, Jingxuan Xu, Ying Zhang, Weimin Dai, Xianghong Yang, Lifang Xue, Yu Zhang, Chaobin Zhang, Rodney Mauricio, Gary Peng, Shuijin Hu, Bernal Valverde, Xiaoling Song, Yi Li, Marc Stift & Sheng Qiang
Angiosperms are believed to have emerged initially in the tropics and expanded their distribution range polewards through diverse mechanisms, for example polyploidization-driven cold-tolerance evolution. Reversed expansion from temperate to pantropic climate through a polyploidization-driven shift in heat-tolerance remains largely unknown. Here, we found autopolyploidy in relation to the global expansion of Solidago canadensis from its temperate-climate native range in North American to hot-summer climate in an introduced range. Our cytogeographical study of 2062 accessions from...

The sunflower (Helianthus annuusL.) genome reflects a recent history of biased accumulation of transposable elements

S. Evan Staton, Bradley H. Bakken, Benjamin K. Blackman, Mark A. Chapman, Nolan C. Kane, Shunxue Tang, Mark C. Ungerer, Steven J. Knapp, Loren H. Rieseberg & John M. Burke
Aside from polyploidy, transposable elements are the major drivers of genome size increases in plants. Thus, understanding the diversity and evolutionary dynamics of transposable elements in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), especially given its large genome size (∼3.5 Gb) and the well‐documented cases of amplification of certain transposons within the genus, is of considerable importance for understanding the evolutionary history of this emerging model species. By analyzing approximately 25% of the sunflower genome from random sequence...

Fruit preferences by fishes in a Neotropical floodplain

Joisiane Mendes Araujo, Sandra Bibiana Correa, Jill Anderson & Jerry Penha.
The diets of frugivorous animals result from the interaction between feeding preference and ecological factors such as availability of alternative resources and interactions with other frugivores. A better understanding of frugivore diets will enable predictions about the vulnerability of plant populations to anthropogenic or natural environmental changes. In addition, frugivores with greater variation in diet (generalists) are potentially more resilient to habitat changes than specialists. Here, we combined data on diets of frugivorous fishes with...

Models to assess ability to achieve localized areas of reduced white-tailed deer density

Amanda Van Buskirk, Christopher Rosenberry, Bret Wallingford, Emily Just Domoto, Marc McDill, Patrick Drohan & Duane Diefenbach
Localized management of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) involves the removal of matriarchal family units with the intent to create areas of reduced deer density. However, application of this approach has not always been successful, possibly because of female dispersal and high deer densities. We developed a spatially explicit, agent-based model to investigate the intensity of deer removal required to locally reduce deer density depending on the surrounding deer density, dispersal behavior, and size and shape...

Relative reproductive phenology and synchrony affect neonate survival in a nonprecocial ungulate

Eric Michel, Bronson Strickland, Stephen Demarais, Jerrold Belant, Todd Kautz, Jared Duquette, Dean Beyer, Michael Chamberlain, Karl Miller, Rebecca Shuman, John Kilgo, Duane Diefenbach, Bret Wallingford, Justin Vreeland, Steve Ditchkoff, Christopher DePerno, Christopher Moorman, Michael Chitwood & Marcus Lashley
1. Degree of reproductive synchronization in prey is hypothesized as a predator defense strategy reducing prey risk via predator satiation or predator avoidance. Species with precocial young, especially those exposed to specialist predators, should be highly synchronous to satiate predators (predator satiation hypothesis), while prey with nonprecocial (i.e., altricial) young, especially those exposed to generalist predators, should become relatively asynchronous to avoid predator detection (predator avoidance hypothesis). The white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in North America...

The perfect storm: Gene tree estimation error, incomplete lineage sorting, and ancient gene flow explain the most recalcitrant ancient angiosperm clade, Malpighiales

Liming Cai, Zhenxiang Xi, Emily Lemmon, Alan Lemmon, Austin Mast, Christopher Buddenhagen, Liang Liu & Charles Davis
The genomic revolution offers renewed hope of resolving rapid radiations in the Tree of Life. The development of the multispecies coalescent (MSC) model and improved gene tree estimation methods can better accommodate gene tree heterogeneity caused by incomplete lineage sorting (ILS) and gene tree estimation error stemming from the short internal branches. However, the relative influence of these factors in species tree inference is not well understood. Using anchored hybrid enrichment, we generated a data...

No net insect abundance and diversity declines across US Long Term Ecological Research sites

Michael Crossley, Amanda Meier, Emily Baldwin, Lauren Berry, Leah Crenshaw, Glen Hartman, Doris Lagos-Kutz, David Nichols, Krishna Patel, Sofia Varriano, Matthew Moran & William Snyder
Recent reports of dramatic declines in insect abundance suggest grave consequences for global ecosystems and human society. Most evidence comes from Europe, however, leaving uncertainty about insect population trends worldwide. We used > 5,300 time series for insects and other arthropods, collected over 4-36 years at monitoring sites representing 68 different natural and managed areas, to search for evidence of declines across the United States. Some taxa and sites showed decreases in abundance and diversity...

Ambient temperature and female body condition are related to night incubation behavior in wood ducks (Aix sponsa)

Alexander Grimaudo, Sydney Hope, Sarah DuRant, Robert Kennamer, John Hallagan & William Hopkins
For many animals, parental care behavior is an important aspect of their life history that affects both parents and offspring. In birds, one of the most important parental care behaviors is incubation, which is costly to the parent but directly influences embryonic development and fitness of offspring. Some birds exhibit the intriguing behavior of partially incubating their eggs prior to clutch completion for only a portion of each day. This partial incubation is characterized by...

Data from: Large-scale patterns of seed removal by small mammals differ between areas of low vs. high wolf occupancy

Jennifer L. Chandler, Timothy R. Van Deelen, Nathan P. Nibbelink & John L. Orrock
Because most tree species recruit from seeds, seed predation by small-mammal granivores may be important for determining plant distribution and regeneration in forests. Despite the importance of seed predation, large-scale patterns of small-mammal granivory are often highly variable and thus, difficult to predict. We hypothesize distributions of apex predators can create large-scale variation in the distribution and abundance of mesopredators that consume small-mammals, creating predictable areas of high and low granivory. For example, because gray...

Data from: A comparison of diversity estimators applied to a database of host-parasite associations

Claire Teitelbaum, Caroline Amoroso, Shan Huang, T. Jonathan Davies, Julie Rushmore, John Drake, Patrick Stephens, James Byers, Ania Majewska & Charles Nunn
Understanding the drivers of biodiversity is important for forecasting changes in the distribution of life on earth. However, most studies of biodiversity are limited by uneven sampling effort, with some regions or taxa better sampled than others. Numerous methods have been developed to account for differences in sampling effort, but most methods were developed for systematic surveys in which all study units are sampled using the same design and assemblages are sampled randomly. Databases compiled...

Data from: An initial comparative genomic autopsy of wasting disease in sea stars

Dannise V. Ruiz‐Ramos, Lauren M. Schiebelhut, Katharina J. Hoff, John P. Wares & Michael N. Dawson
Beginning in 2013, sea stars throughout the Eastern North Pacific were decimated by wasting disease, also known as ‘asteroid idiopathic wasting syndrome’ (AIWS) due to its elusive etiology. The geographic extent and taxonomic scale of AIWS meant events leading up to the outbreak were heterogeneous, multifaceted, and oftentimes unobserved; progression from morbidity to death was rapid, leaving few tell-tale symptoms. Here we take a forensic genomic approach to discover candidate genes that may help explain...

Modeling Conventionalization and Predictability within MWEs at the Brain Level

Shohini Bhattasali, Murielle Popa-Fabre, Christophe Pallier & John Hale

Data from: A phylogeny for the Drosophila montium species group: a model clade for comparative analyses

William Conner, Emily Delaney, Michael Bronski, Paul Ginsberg, Timothy Wheeler, Kelly Richardson, Brooke Peckenpaugh, Kevin Kim, Masayoshi Watada, Ary Hoffmann, Michael Eisen, Artyom Kopp, Brandon Cooper & Michael Turelli
The Drosophila montium species group is a clade of 94 named species closely related to the model D. melanogaster species group. The montium species group is distributed over a broad geographic range throughout Asia, Africa, and Australasia. Species of this group possess a wide range of morphologies, mating behaviors, and endosymbiont associations, making this clade useful for comparative analyses. We use genomic data from 42 available species to estimate the phylogeny and relative divergence times...

Habitat use as an indicator of adaptive capacity to climate change

Claire Teitelbaum, Alexej Siren, Ethan Coffel, Jane Foster, Jacqueline Frair, Joseph Hinton, Radley Horton, David Kramer, Corey Lesk, Colin Raymond, David Wattles, Katherine Zeller & Toni Lyn Morelli
Aim: Populations of cold-adapted species at the trailing edges of geographic ranges are particularly vulnerable to the negative effects of climate change from the combination of exposure to warm temperatures and high sensitivity to heat. Many of these species are predicted to decline under future climate scenarios, but they could persist if they can adapt to warming climates either physiologically or behaviorally. We aim to understand local variation in contemporary habitat use and use this...

Data from: Recognizing pulses of extinction from clusters of last occurrences

Joshua Zimmt, Steven Holland, Seth Finnegan & Charles Marshall
The distribution of last occurrences of fossil taxa in a stratigraphic column are used to infer the pattern, timing, and tempo of extinction from the fossil record. Clusters of last occurrences are commonly interpreted as an abrupt pulse of extinction. However, stratigraphic architecture alone can produce clusters of last occurrences that can be misinterpreted as an extinction pulse. These clusters will typically occur in strata that immediately underlie facies changes and sequence-stratigraphic surfaces. It has...

Data from: Anatomical and hydraulic responses to desiccation in emergent conifer seedlings

Daniel Johnson, Megan Miller, Adam Roddy, Craig Brodersen & Andrew McElrone
Premise of the study: The young seedling life stage is critical for reforestation after disturbance and for species migration under climate change, yet little is known regarding their basic hydraulic function or vulnerability to drought. Here, we sought to characterize responses to desiccation including hydraulic vulnerability, xylem anatomical traits, and impacts on other stem tissues that contribute to hydraulic functioning. Methods: Larix occidentalis , Pseudotsuga menziesii , and Pinus ponderosa (all < 6 weeks-old) were...

Data from: The multispecies coalescent model outperforms concatenation across diverse phylogenomic

Xiaodong Jiang, Scott Edwards & Liang Liu
A statistical framework of model comparison and model validation is essential to resolving the debates over concatenation and coalescent models in phylogenomic data analysis. A set of statistical tests are here applied and developed to evaluate and compare the adequacy of substitution, concatenation, and multispecies coalescent (MSC) models across 47 phylogenomic data sets collected across tree of life. Tests for substitution models and the concatenation assumption of topologically concordant gene trees suggest that a poor...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    68

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    64
  • Text
    4

Affiliations

  • University of Georgia
    68
  • Duke University
    4
  • University of California, Berkeley
    4
  • University of California, Davis
    4
  • United States Geological Survey
    3
  • University of British Columbia
    3
  • University of Montana
    2
  • Stanford University
    2
  • The Nature Conservancy
    2
  • Columbia University
    2