78 Works

Data from: Uncovering cryptic parasitoid diversity in Horismenus (Chalcidoidea, Eulophidae)

Sarah G. Kenyon, Sven Buerki, Christer Hansson, Nadir Alvarez & Betty Benrey
Horismenus parasitoids are an abundant and understudied group of eulophid wasps found mainly in the New World. Recent surveys based on morphological analyses in Costa Rica have quadrupled the number of named taxa, with more than 400 species described so far. This recent revision suggests that there is still a vast number of unknown species to be identified. As Horismenus wasps have been widely described as parasitoids of insect pests associated with crop plants, it...

Data from: Gene flow between wheat and wild relatives: empirical evidence from Aegilops geniculata, Ae. neglecta and Ae. triuncialis

Nils Arrigo, Roberto Guadagnuolo, Sylvain Lappe, Sophie Pasche, Christian Parisod & François Felber
Gene flow between domesticated species and their wild relatives is receiving growing attention. The present study addressed introgression between wheat and natural populations of its wild relatives (Aegilops species). The sampling included 472 individuals, collected from 32 Mediterranean populations of three widespread Aegilops species (Ae. geniculata, Ae. neglecta and Ae. triuncialis), and compared wheat field borders to areas isolated from agriculture. Individuals were characterized with AFLP fingerprinting, analysed through two computational approaches (i.e. Bayesian estimations...

Data from: The simultaneous inducibility of phytochemicals related to plant direct and indirect defences against herbivores is stronger at low elevation

Loïc Pellissier, Xoaquín Moreira, Holger Danner, Martha Serrano, Nicolas Salamin, Nicole M. Van Dam & Sergio Rasmann
Ecological theory indicates that warmer and more stable climates should result in stronger biotic interactions. Therefore, plant species growing at lower elevations and experiencing greater herbivore pressure, should invest in higher levels of defences than those at higher elevations. Nonetheless, there are a number of studies that have found no effect of elevational gradients on plant defensive traits. Several factors might explain the lack of consistency for the altitude-defence relationships; including 1) the reduction of...

Data from: Female monkeys use both the carrot and the stick to promote male participation in intergroup fights

T. Jean Marie Arseneau-Robar, Anouk Lisa Taucher, Eliane Müller, Carel Van Schaik, Redouan Bshary & Erik P. Willems
Group-level cooperation often poses a social dilemma in which joint action may be difficult to achieve. Theoretical models and experimental work on humans show that social incentives, such as punishment of defectors and rewarding of cooperators, can promote cooperation in groups of unrelated individuals. Here, we demonstrate that these processes can operate in a non-human animal species, and be used to effectively promote the production of a public good. We took advantage of the fact...

Data from: Evolutionary dynamics of specialisation in herbivorous stick insects

Chloé Larose, Sergio Rasmann & Tanja Schwander
Understanding the evolutionary dynamics underlying herbivorous insect mega-diversity requires investigating the ability of insects to shift and adapt to different host plants. Feeding experiments with nine related stick insect species revealed that insects retain the ability to use ancestral host plants after shifting to novel hosts, with host plant shifts generating fundamental feeding niche expansions. These expansions were however not accompanied by expansions of the realized feeding niches, as species on novel hosts are generally...

Data from: Power and temptation cause shifts between exploitation and cooperation in a cleaner wrasse mutualism

Simon Gingins, Redouan Bshary, Johanna Werminghausen, Rufus A. Johnstone & Alexandra S. Grutter
In many instances of cooperation, only one individual has both the potential and the incentive to ‘cheat’ and exploit its partner. Under these asymmetric conditions, a simple model predicts that variation in the temptation to cheat and in the potential victim's capacity for partner control leads to shifts between exploitation and cooperation. Here, we show that the threat of early termination of an interaction was sufficient to induce cleaner wrasse Labroides dimidiatus to feed selectively...

Data from: Effects of food variability on growth and reproduction of Aedes aegypti

Michael Zeller & Jacob C. Koella
Despite a large body of knowledge about the evolution of life histories, we know little about how variable food availability during an individual's development affects its life history. We measured the effects of manipulating food levels during early and late larval development of the mosquito Aedes aegypti on its growth rate, life history and reproductive success. Switching from low to high food led to compensatory growth: individuals grew more rapidly during late larval development and...

Data from: Corticosterone: effects on feather quality and deposition into feathers

Susanne Jenni-Eiermann, Fabrice Helfenstein, Armelle Vallat, Gaétan Glauser & Lukas Jenni
1. The concentration of the glucocorticoid hormone corticosterone (CORT) is increasingly used in ecology and conservation biology as an integrated measure of the historical record of an individual's hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) activity during feather growth. However, where and how CORT is incorporated in feathers is incompletely known. 2. We therefore examined whether CORT is reliably measured with an enzyme immunoassay, where CORT is incorporated in the feather and where it affects feather quality, and whether CORT...

Data from: Male monkeys use punishment and coercion to de-escalate costly intergroup fights

T. Jean M. Arseneau-Robar, Eliane Müller, Anouk L. Taucher, Carel P. Van Schaik, Redouan Bshary & Erik P. Willems
In numerous social species, males direct aggression towards female group members during intergroup fights, and this behaviour is commonly thought to function as mate guarding, even though males often target non-receptive females. In studying intergroup fights in a wild population of vervet monkeys, we found that male intragroup aggression was primarily directed towards individuals who had either just finished exhibiting, or were currently attempting to instigate intergroup aggression. Targeted females were less likely to instigate...

Data from: Microbiome affects egg carotenoid investment, nestling development and adult oxidative costs of reproduction in Great tits

Staffan Jacob, Nathalie Parthuisot, Armelle Vallat, Felipe Ramon-Portugal, Fabrice Helfenstein & Philipp Heeb
1. Parasites influence allocation trade-offs between reproduction and self-maintenance and consequently shape host life-history traits. The host microbiome includes pathogenic and commensal micro-organisms that are remarkable in their diversity and ubiquity. However, experimental studies investigating whether the microbiome shapes host reproduction are still lacking. 2. In this study, we tested whether the microbiome affects three important components of bird reproduction, namely (i) the maternal transfer of anti-microbial compounds to the eggs, (ii) the development of...

Plant defense resistance in natural enemies of a specialist insect herbivore

Xi Zhang, Cong Van Doan, Carla C.M. Arce, Lingfei Hu, Sandra Gruenig, Christian Parisod, Bruce E. Hibbard, , Chad Nielson, Christelle A.M. Robert, Ricardo A.R. Machado & Matthias Erb
Plants defend themselves against herbivores through the production of toxic and deterrent metabolites. Adapted herbivores can tolerate and sometimes sequester these metabolites, allowing them to feed on defended plants and become toxic to their own enemies. Can herbivore natural enemies overcome sequestered plant defense metabolites to prey on adapted herbivores? To address this question, we studied how entomopathogenic nematodes cope with benzoxazinoid defense metabolites that are produced by grasses and sequestered by a specialist maize...

Data from: Very high resolution digital elevation models: are multi-scale derived variables ecologically relevant?

Kevin Leempoel, Christian Parisod, Céline Geiser, Lucas Daprà, Pascal Vittoz & Stéphane Joost
Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) are often used in landscape ecology to retrieve elevation or first derivative terrain attributes such as slope or aspect in the context of species distribution modelling. However, DEM-derived variables are scale-dependent and, given the increasing availability of very high resolution (VHR) DEMs, their ecological relevance must be assessed for different spatial resolutions. In a study area located in the Swiss Western Alps, we computed VHR DEMs-derived variables related to morphometry, hydrology...

Maintenance of variation in virulence and reproduction in populations of an agricultural plant pathogen

Anik Dutta, Daniel Croll, Bruce A. McDonald & Luke G. Barrett
Genetic diversity within pathogen populations is critically important for predicting pathogen evolution, disease outcomes, and prevalence. However, we lack a good understanding of the processes maintaining genetic variation and constraints on pathogen life‐history evolution. Here, we analyzed interactions between 12 wheat host genotypes and 145 strains of Zymoseptoria tritici from five global populations to investigate the evolution and maintenance of variation in pathogen virulence and reproduction. We found a strong positive correlation between virulence (amount...

Data from: To bee or not to bee: the “raison d’être” of toxic secondary compounds in the pollen of Boraginaceae

Christophe Praz, Vincent Trunz, Matteo Lucchetti, Dimitri Bénon, Achik Dorchin, Gaylord Desurmont, Christina Kast, Sergio Rasmann & Gaëtan Glauser
This dataset contains all data analyzed in the article "To bee or not to bee: The “raison d’être” of toxic secondary compounds in the pollen of Boraginaceae", by V. Trunz et al, published in Functional Ecology. List of files: in "PGLS" folder, "PA_values.csv" gives the transformed PA values for pollen and corolla. "Group" stands for Borago-Group (1) or other species (0). The tree ("tree_Boraginaceae.txt") is in Nexus format. This dataset can be used for CAPER...

Data from: Sequential co-infections drive parasite competition and the outcome of infection

Giacomo Zilio & Jacob Koella
1) Co-infections by multiple parasites are common in natural populations. Some of these are likely to be the result of sequential rather than simultaneous infections. The timing of the co-infections may affect their competitive interactions, thereby influencing the success of the parasites and their impact on the host. This may have important consequence for epidemiological and eco-evolutionary dynamics. 2) We examined in two ecological conditions the effect of sequential co-infection on the outcome of infection...

Data from: Heritable variation in root secondary metabolites is associated with recent climate

Zoe Bont, Tobias Züst, Carla Arce, Meret Huber & Matthias Erb
1. Plants can adapt to changing environments by adjusting the production and maintenance of diverse sets of bioactive secondary metabolites. To date, the impact of climatic conditions relative to other factors such as soil abiotic factors and herbivore pressure on the evolution of plant secondary metabolites is poorly understood, especially for plant roots. 2. We explored associations between root latex secondary metabolites in 63 Taraxacum officinale populations across Switzerland and climatic conditions, soil abiotic parameters,...

Data from: Age and sex affect quantitative genetic parameters for dominance rank and aggression in free-living greylag geese

Brigitte M. Weiß & Katharina Foerster
Knowledge of the genetic and environmental influences on a character is pivotal for understanding evolutionary changes in quantitative traits in natural populations. Dominance and aggression are ubiquitous traits that are selectively advantageous in many animal societies and have the potential to impact the evolutionary trajectory of animal populations. Here we provide age- and sex-specific estimates of additive genetic and environmental components of variance for dominance rank and aggression rate in a free-living, human-habituated bird population...

Data from: Growth-competition-herbivore resistance trade-offs and the responses of alpine plant communities to climate change

Loïc Pellissier, Patrice Descombes, Oskar Hagen, Loïc Chalmandrier, Gaëtan Glauser, Alan Kergunteuil, Emmanuel Defossez & Sergio Rasmann
1. Climate change is expected to modify current ecological conditions sustaining the coexistence of species within cold-adapted plant communities, by influencing species growth, modifying competition and levels of herbivory. Climate change will act upon the existing structure of communities, whose response should depend on the functional differences governing coexistence among alpine species. We postulated that a possible trade-off between (i) plant growth in response to temperature, (ii) plant competition, and (iii) resistance to herbivory, should...

Data from: Modification of sperm quality after sexual abstinence in Seba's short-tailed bat, Carollia perspicillata.

Charlotte Wesseling, Nicolas Fasel, Heinz Richner & Fabrice Helfenstein
In polygynous mating systems, few males have stable access to sexual mates. With an expected higher copulation rate, harem males may deplete seminal fluids or increase epididymal sperm maturation, generating poor sperm quality. In a first study, we reported a higher sperm quality in sneaker males of Carollia perspicillata. To test whether the lower sperm quality observed in harem males was generated by an elevated copulation rate, we temporarily removed males of both social statuses...

Data from: Including community composition in biodiversity-productivity models

Nadine Sandau, Rudolf P. Rohr, Russell E. Naisbit, Yvonne Fabian, Odile T. Bruggisser, Patrik Kehrli, Alexandre Aebi & Louis-Félix Bersier
1. Studies on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning (BEF) have elicited debate over the interpretation of the positive relationship between species richness and plant productivity. Manipulating richness cannot be achieved without affecting composition; it is thus essential to consider the latter in statistical models. 2. We firstly review existing approaches that use species richness as an explanatory variable and propose modifications to improve their performance. We use an original dataset to illustrate the analyses. The classical...

Data from: Social network analysis shows direct evidence for social transmission of tool use in wild chimpanzees.

Catherine Hobaiter, Timothée Poisot, Klaus Zuberbühler, William Hoppitt & Thibaud Gruber
Claims of culture in animals have been stimulated by studies on a wide range of taxa revealing group-specific behavior patterns that remain stable through generations, consistent with different behavioral innovations spreading within groups by social transmission in a manner similar to human culture. In chimpanzees, 39 behaviors have been identified as 'cultural', because alternative genetic and environmental explanations for the observed regional variation appear less plausible. This interpretation is supported by experimental data from captive...

Data from: Evolution of plant defences along an invasion chronosequence: defence is lost due to enemy release- but not forever

Michal Gruntman, Udi Segev, Gaetan Glauser & Katja Tielbörger
The success of invasive plants has often been attributed to their rapid evolution at the introduced range. In particular, release from native enemies has been suggested to select for an evolutionary shift in resource allocation patterns from herbivore defence to increased size. Such evolutionary processes can take place not only between the native and invasive ranges but also within the invasive range over time, but this premise has been very seldom studied. In this study,...

Data from: Test of biotic and abiotic correlates of latitudinal variation in defences in the perennial herb Ruellia nudiflora

Luis Abdala-Roberts, Xoaquín Moreira, Sergio Rasmann, Victor Parra-Tabla & Kailen A. Mooney
1. Geographic variation in abiotic factors and species interactions is widespread and is hypothesized to generate concomitant patterns of species trait variation. For example, higher rates of herbivory at lower latitudes are thought to select for increased plant defences, although latitudinal variation in defences may also be influenced directly by abiotic factors and indirectly by predators and parasitoids reducing herbivore pressure. 2. We measured defences of the herb Ruellia nudiflora among 30 populations spanning a...

Data from: Effects of an early-life paraquat exposure on adult resistance to oxidative stress, plumage colour and sperm performance in a wild bird

Sylvain Losdat, Jonathan D. Blount, Viviana Marri, Lea Maronde, Heinz Richner & Fabrice Helfenstein
1. Early-life stressful conditions can shape individual phenotypes and ultimately influence fitness. Oxidative stress is a pervasive threat that affects many fitness-related traits and can modulate life-history trade-offs. Yet, the extent to which exposure to oxidative stress during early life can have long-lasting effects on key fitness-related traits remains to be elucidated, particularly in natural populations of vertebrates. 2. Using a wild population of great tits Parus major, we experimentally dosed 11 day-old birds with...

Data from: Latitudinal variation in plant chemical defences drives latitudinal patterns of leaf herbivory

Xoaquón Moreira, Bastien Castagneyrol, Luis Abdala-Roberts, Jorge C. Berny-Mier Y Terán, Bart G. H. Timmermans, Hans Henrik Kehlet Bruun, Felisa Covelo, Gaétan Glauser, Sergio Rasmann, Ayco J. M. Tack & Hans Henrik Bruun
A long-standing paradigm in ecology holds that herbivore pressure and thus plant defences increase towards lower latitudes. However, recent work has challenged this prediction where studies have found no relationship or opposite trends where herbivory or plant defences increase at higher latitudes. Here we tested for latitudinal variation in herbivory, chemical defences (phenolic compounds), and nutritional traits (phosphorus and nitrogen) in leaves of a long-lived tree species, the English oak Quercus robur. We further investigated...

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