94 Works

Data from: Gene flow between wheat and wild relatives: empirical evidence from Aegilops geniculata, Ae. neglecta and Ae. triuncialis

Nils Arrigo, Roberto Guadagnuolo, Sylvain Lappe, Sophie Pasche, Christian Parisod & François Felber
Gene flow between domesticated species and their wild relatives is receiving growing attention. The present study addressed introgression between wheat and natural populations of its wild relatives (Aegilops species). The sampling included 472 individuals, collected from 32 Mediterranean populations of three widespread Aegilops species (Ae. geniculata, Ae. neglecta and Ae. triuncialis), and compared wheat field borders to areas isolated from agriculture. Individuals were characterized with AFLP fingerprinting, analysed through two computational approaches (i.e. Bayesian estimations...

Data from: Female monkeys use both the carrot and the stick to promote male participation in intergroup fights

T. Jean Marie Arseneau-Robar, Anouk Lisa Taucher, Eliane Müller, Carel Van Schaik, Redouan Bshary & Erik P. Willems
Group-level cooperation often poses a social dilemma in which joint action may be difficult to achieve. Theoretical models and experimental work on humans show that social incentives, such as punishment of defectors and rewarding of cooperators, can promote cooperation in groups of unrelated individuals. Here, we demonstrate that these processes can operate in a non-human animal species, and be used to effectively promote the production of a public good. We took advantage of the fact...

Prosocial and antisocial choices in a monogamous cichlid with biparental care

Shun Satoh, Redouan Bshary, Momoko Shibasaki, Shumpei Sogawa, Takashi Hotta, Masanori Kohda, Seishiro Inaba & Satoshi Awata
Human society is cooperative and characterized by spontaneous prosociality. Comparative studies on endotherm vertebrates suggest that social interdependence causes the evolution of proactive prosociality. To test the generality of this hypothesis, we modified a prosocial choice task for application to the convict cichlid, Amatitlania nigrofasciata, a monogamous fish with biparental care and a strong pair bond. We show that subject males learned to favor prosocial choices when their mates were the recipients in neighboring tank....

No evidence for conspecific recruitment for cooperative hunting in lionfish Pterois miles

Hanaa Sarhan & Redouan Bshary
Lionfish are common piscivores in the Indo-Pacific and invasive in the Caribbean. A fin flaring pattern, involving a rapid undulation of the caudal fin and sequential turning of both pectoral fins, was described in zebra lionfish as a signal to initiate cooperative hunting, and it was hypothesized that such hunting tactics may also exist in other lionfish species and contribute to their successful invasion in the Caribbean. Here, we investigated one of those invasive species,...

Plant defense resistance in natural enemies of a specialist insect herbivore

Xi Zhang, Cong Van Doan, Carla C.M. Arce, Lingfei Hu, Sandra Gruenig, Christian Parisod, Bruce E. Hibbard, , Chad Nielson, Christelle A.M. Robert, Ricardo A.R. Machado & Matthias Erb
Plants defend themselves against herbivores through the production of toxic and deterrent metabolites. Adapted herbivores can tolerate and sometimes sequester these metabolites, allowing them to feed on defended plants and become toxic to their own enemies. Can herbivore natural enemies overcome sequestered plant defense metabolites to prey on adapted herbivores? To address this question, we studied how entomopathogenic nematodes cope with benzoxazinoid defense metabolites that are produced by grasses and sequestered by a specialist maize...

Maintenance of variation in virulence and reproduction in populations of an agricultural plant pathogen

Anik Dutta, Daniel Croll, Bruce A. McDonald & Luke G. Barrett
Genetic diversity within pathogen populations is critically important for predicting pathogen evolution, disease outcomes, and prevalence. However, we lack a good understanding of the processes maintaining genetic variation and constraints on pathogen life‐history evolution. Here, we analyzed interactions between 12 wheat host genotypes and 145 strains of Zymoseptoria tritici from five global populations to investigate the evolution and maintenance of variation in pathogen virulence and reproduction. We found a strong positive correlation between virulence (amount...

Spatial and temporal heterogeneity in pollinator communities maintains within-species floral odour variation

Mark A. Szenteczki, Adrienne Godschalx, Andrea Galmán, Anahí Espíndola, Marc Gibernau, Nadir Alvarez & Sergio Rasmann
Flowering plants emit complex bouquets of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to mediate interactions with their pollinators. These bouquets are undoubtedly influenced by pollinator-mediated selection, particularly in deceptively-pollinated species that rely on chemical mimicry. However, many uncertainties remain regarding how spatially and temporally heterogeneous pollinators affect the diversity and distribution of floral odour variation. Here, we characterized and compared the floral odours of ten populations of deceptively-pollinated Arum maculatum (Araceae), and inter-annual and decadal variation in...

Data from: The effect of community-wide phytochemical diversity on herbivory reverses from low to high elevation

Pilar Fernandez-Conradi, Defossez Emmanuel, Delavallade Adrien, Patrice Descombes, Camille Pitteloud, Gaëtan Glauser, Loïc Pellissier & Sergio Rasmann
1. Theory predicts that a large fraction of phytochemical diversity – the richness of individual chemical compounds produced by plants – governs the complexity of interactions between plants and their herbivores. While the effect of specific classes of chemical compounds on plant resistance against herbivores has been largely documented, the effect of community-level variation in phytochemical diversity on plant-herbivore interactions has so far received minimal consideration. 2. We hypothesized that plant communities bearing on average...

Avant-propos Français parlés et français 'tout court'

Julie Rothenbühler, Maguelone Sauzet, Marie-Jose Beguelin & Gilles Corminboeuf

Les intentions contradictoires des Suisses vis-à-vis de leur consommation d’énergie

Mehdi Farsi, Laurent Ott & Sylvain Weber

Data from: Decoupled post-glacial history in mutualistic plant-insect interactions: insights from the yellow loosestrife (Lysimachia vulgaris) and its associated oil-collecting bees (Macropis europaea and M. fulvipes)

Yann Triponez, Anahí Espíndola, Nils Arrigo & Nadir Alvarez
Aim: We take a comparative phylogeographical approach to assess whether three species involved in a specialized oil-rewarding pollination system (i.e. Lysimachia vulgaris and two oil-collecting bees within the genus Macropis) show congruent phylogeographical trajectories during post-glacial colonization processes. Our working hypothesis is that within specialized mutualistic interactions, where each species relies on the co-occurrence of the other for survival and/or reproduction, partners are expected to show congruent evolutionary trajectories, because they are likely to have...

Data from: Earthworms affect plant growth and resistance against herbivores: a meta-analysis

Zhenggao Xiao, Xie Wang, Julia Koricheva, Alan Kergunteuil, Renee-Claire Le Bayon, Manqiang Liu, Feng Hu & Sergio Rasmann
1. Subterranean detritivores such as earthworms can increase soil nutrient availability through their burrowing and casting activities. A number of recent studies have explored whether these changes caused by earthworms may in turn affect plant performance and resistance to herbivores, but no formal synthesis of this literature has been conducted to date. 2. We here formally tested for the effects of earthworms on plant growth, resistance and chemical defence against insect herbivores by performing a...

Data from: Social familiarity affects Diana monkey (Cercopithecus diana diana) alarm call responses in habitat-specific ways

Claudia Stephan & Klaus Zuberbühler
Male Diana monkeys produce loud and acoustically distinct alarm calls to leopards and eagles that propagate over long distances, much beyond the immediate group. Calling is often contagious, with neighbouring males responding to each other’s calls, indicating that harem males communicate both to local group members and distant competitors. Here, we tested whether male Diana monkeys responding to each other’s alarm calls discriminated familiar from unfamiliar callers in two populations in Taï Forest (Ivory Coast)...

Data from: Evaluating NGS methods for routine monitoring of wild bees: metabarcoding, mitogenomics or NGS barcoding

Morgan Gueuning, Dominik Ganser, Simon Blaser, Matthias Albrecht, Eva Knop, Christophe Praz & Juerg E. Frey
Implementing cost-effective monitoring programs for wild bees remains challenging due to the high costs of sampling and specimen identification. To reduce costs, next generation sequencing (NGS)-based methods have lately been suggested as alternatives to morphology-based identifications. To provide a comprehensive presentation of the advantages and weaknesses of different NGS-based identification methods, we assessed three of the most promising ones, namely metabarcoding, mitogenomics and NGS barcoding. Using a regular monitoring dataset (723 specimens identified using morphology),...

Data from: Skin temperature changes in wild chimpanzees upon hearing vocalizations of conspecifics

Guillaume Dezecache, Klaus Zuberbuhler, Marina Davila-Ross & Christoph D. Dahl
A growing trend of research using infrared thermography (IRT) has shown that changes in skin temperature, associated with activity of the autonomic nervous system, can be reliably detected in human and non-human animals. A contact-free method, IRT provides the opportunity to uncover emotional states in free-ranging animals during social interactions. Here, we measured nose and ear temperatures of wild chimpanzees of Budongo Forest, Uganda, when exposed to naturally occurring vocalizations of conspecifics. We found a...

Data from: Wood ants produce a potent antimicrobial agent by applying formic acid on tree-collected resin

Timothée Brütsch, Geoffrey Jaffuel, Armelle Vallat, Ted C. J. Turlings & Michel Chapuisat
Wood ants fight pathogens by incorporating tree resin with antimicrobial properties into their nests. They also produce large quantities of formic acid in their venom gland, which they readily spray to defend or disinfect their nest. Mixing chemicals to produce powerful antibiotics is common practice in human medicine, yet evidence for the use of such “defensive cocktails” by animals remains scant. Here, we test the hypothesis that wood ants enhance the antifungal activity of tree...

Data from: Diplostigmaty in plants: a novel mechanism that provides reproductive assurance

Jonathan Kissling & Spencer C. H. Barrett
Differentiation of female sexual organs in flowering plants is rare, and contrasts with the wide range of male reproductive strategies. An unusual example involves diplostigmaty, the possession of spatially and temporally distinct stigmas in Sebaea (Gentianaceae). Here, the single pistil within a flower has an apical stigma, as occurs in most flowering plants, but also a secondary stigma that occurs mid-way down the style, which is physically discrete and receptive several days after the apical...

Data from: Coevolution between positive reciprocity, punishment, and partner switching in repeated interactions

Matthias Wubs, Redouan Bshary & Laurent Lehmann
Cooperation based on mutual investments can occur between unrelated individuals when they are engaged in repeated interactions. Individuals then need to use a conditional strategy to deter their interaction partners from defecting. Responding to defection such that the future payoff of a defector is reduced relative to cooperating with it is called a partner control mechanism. Three main partner control mechanisms are (i) to switch from cooperation to defection when being defected (‘positive reciprocity’), (ii)...

Data from: Variable effects on growth and defence traits for plant ecotypic differentiation and phenotypic plasticity along elevation gradients

Moe Bakhtiari, Ludovico Formenti, Veronica Caggìa, Gaëtan Glauser & Sergio Rasmann
Along ecological gradients, phenotypic differentiation can arise through natural selection on trait diversity and magnitude, and environment-driven plastic changes. The magnitude of ecotypic differentiation versus phenotypic plasticity can vary depending on the traits under study. Using reciprocal transplant-common gardens along steep elevation gradients, we evaluated patterns of ecotypic differentiation and phenotypic plasticity of several growth and defence-related traits for two coexisting but unrelated plant species, Cardamine pratensis and Plantago major. For both species, we observed...

Data from: Behavioural patterns of vocal greeting production in four primate species

Pawel Fedurek, Christof Neumann, Yaelle Bouquet, Stephanie Mercier, Martina Magris, Fredy Quintero & Klaus Zuberbühler
Social animals have evolved a range of signals to avoid aggressive and facilitate affiliative interactions. Vocal behaviour is especially important in this respect with many species, including various primates, producing acoustically distinct ‘greeting calls’ when two individuals approach each other. While the ultimate function of greeting calls has been explored in several species, little effort has been made to understand the mechanisms of this behaviour across species. The aim of this study was to explore...

Data from: Environmental stress linked to consumption of maternally derived carotenoids in brown trout embryos (Salmo trutta)

Laetitia G. E. Wilkins, Lucas Marques Da Cunha, Gaëtan Glauser, Armelle Vallat & Claus Wedekind
The yellow, orange, or red colors of salmonid eggs are due to maternally derived carotenoids whose functions are not sufficiently understood yet. Here, we studied the significance of naturally acquired carotenoids as maternal environmental effects during embryo development in brown trout (Salmo trutta). We collected eggs from wild females, quantified their egg carotenoid content, fertilized them in vitro in full-factorial breeding blocks to separate maternal from paternal effects, and raised 3,278 embryos singly at various...

Data from: Pleiotropic effect of the Flowering Locus C on plant resistance and defence against insect herbivores

Sergio Rasmann, Julia Sanchez Vilas, Gaëtan Glauser, Maria Cartolano, Janne Lempe, Miltos Tsiantis & John R. Pannell
1. Plants vary widely in the extent to which they defend themselves against herbivores. Because the resources available to plants are often site-specific, variation among sites dictates investment into defence, and may reveal a growth-defence trade-off. Moreover, plants that have evolved different life-history strategies in different environments may situate themselves on this trade-off curve differently. For instance, plants that flower later have a longer vegetative lifespan, and may accordingly defend themselves differently than those that...

Parasitoids of leaf herbivores enhance plant fitness and do not alter caterpillar-induced resistance against seed beetles

Carlos Bustos-Segura, Maximilien Cuny & Betty Benrey
1. Organisms of the third trophic level can indirectly interact with plants. However, whether parasitoids of herbivores have a positive effect on plant fitness has been controversial. In addition to possible effects on plant fitness, parasitoid-mitigated herbivory can modify plant physiological responses and thereby alter the plant-mediated indirect interactions between different herbivore species. These types of indirect multitrophic interactions remain largely unexplored. Thus, to understand the full effect of the third trophic level on plants,...

Data from: Ecological convergence of secondary phytochemicals along elevational gradients

Sergio Rasmann, Moe Bakhtiari, Emmanuel Defossez & Gaetan Glauser
Biologists still strive to identify the ecological and evolutionary drivers of phytochemical variation that mediate biotic interactions. We hypothesized that plant species growing at sites characterized by high herbivore pressure would converge to produce highly toxic blends of secondary metabolites, independent of phylogenetic constraints. To address the role of shared evolutionary history and ecological niches in driving variation in plant phytochemistry, we combined targeted metabolomics with insect herbivore bioassays and with a set of growth-related...

Data from: Phylogenetic relatedness drives protists assembly in marine and terrestrial environments

Guillaume Lentendu & Micah Dunthorn
Aim: Assembly of protists communities is known to be driven mainly by environmental filtering, but the imprint of phylogenetic relatedness is unknown. In this study, we aim to test the degree at which co-occurrences and co-exclusions of protists in different phylogenetic relatedness classes are deviating from random expectation in two ecosystems in order to link them to ecological processes. Location: Global open-oceans and Neotropical rainforest soils Major taxa: Protists Time period: 2009-2013 Methods: Protist metabarcoding...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    12
  • 2020
    19
  • 2019
    9
  • 2018
    6
  • 2017
    10
  • 2016
    8
  • 2015
    9
  • 2014
    10
  • 2013
    4
  • 2012
    5

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    88
  • Text
    6

Affiliations

  • University of Neuchâtel
    94
  • University of Lausanne
    12
  • University of Bern
    10
  • Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research
    8
  • University of Zurich
    6
  • University of Fribourg
    4
  • Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich
    4
  • Misión Biológica de Galicia
    3
  • Autonomous University of Yucatán
    3
  • Lund University
    2