10 Works

Data from: Latitudinal variation in plant chemical defences drives latitudinal patterns of leaf herbivory

Xoaquón Moreira, Bastien Castagneyrol, Luis Abdala-Roberts, Jorge C. Berny-Mier Y Terán, Bart G. H. Timmermans, Hans Henrik Kehlet Bruun, Felisa Covelo, Gaétan Glauser, Sergio Rasmann, Ayco J. M. Tack & Hans Henrik Bruun
A long-standing paradigm in ecology holds that herbivore pressure and thus plant defences increase towards lower latitudes. However, recent work has challenged this prediction where studies have found no relationship or opposite trends where herbivory or plant defences increase at higher latitudes. Here we tested for latitudinal variation in herbivory, chemical defences (phenolic compounds), and nutritional traits (phosphorus and nitrogen) in leaves of a long-lived tree species, the English oak Quercus robur. We further investigated...

Data from: Wood ants produce a potent antimicrobial agent by applying formic acid on tree-collected resin

Timothée Brütsch, Geoffrey Jaffuel, Armelle Vallat, Ted C. J. Turlings & Michel Chapuisat
Wood ants fight pathogens by incorporating tree resin with antimicrobial properties into their nests. They also produce large quantities of formic acid in their venom gland, which they readily spray to defend or disinfect their nest. Mixing chemicals to produce powerful antibiotics is common practice in human medicine, yet evidence for the use of such “defensive cocktails” by animals remains scant. Here, we test the hypothesis that wood ants enhance the antifungal activity of tree...

Data from: Pleiotropic effect of the Flowering Locus C on plant resistance and defence against insect herbivores

Sergio Rasmann, Julia Sanchez Vilas, Gaëtan Glauser, Maria Cartolano, Janne Lempe, Miltos Tsiantis & John R. Pannell
1. Plants vary widely in the extent to which they defend themselves against herbivores. Because the resources available to plants are often site-specific, variation among sites dictates investment into defence, and may reveal a growth-defence trade-off. Moreover, plants that have evolved different life-history strategies in different environments may situate themselves on this trade-off curve differently. For instance, plants that flower later have a longer vegetative lifespan, and may accordingly defend themselves differently than those that...

Data from: Earthworms affect plant growth and resistance against herbivores: a meta-analysis

Zhenggao Xiao, Xie Wang, Julia Koricheva, Alan Kergunteuil, Renee-Claire Le Bayon, Manqiang Liu, Feng Hu & Sergio Rasmann
1. Subterranean detritivores such as earthworms can increase soil nutrient availability through their burrowing and casting activities. A number of recent studies have explored whether these changes caused by earthworms may in turn affect plant performance and resistance to herbivores, but no formal synthesis of this literature has been conducted to date. 2. We here formally tested for the effects of earthworms on plant growth, resistance and chemical defence against insect herbivores by performing a...

Data from: Environmental stress linked to consumption of maternally derived carotenoids in brown trout embryos (Salmo trutta)

Laetitia G. E. Wilkins, Lucas Marques Da Cunha, Gaëtan Glauser, Armelle Vallat & Claus Wedekind
The yellow, orange, or red colors of salmonid eggs are due to maternally derived carotenoids whose functions are not sufficiently understood yet. Here, we studied the significance of naturally acquired carotenoids as maternal environmental effects during embryo development in brown trout (Salmo trutta). We collected eggs from wild females, quantified their egg carotenoid content, fertilized them in vitro in full-factorial breeding blocks to separate maternal from paternal effects, and raised 3,278 embryos singly at various...

Data from: Decision making for mitigating wildlife diseases: from theory to practice for an emerging fungal pathogen of amphibians

Stefano Canessa, Claudio Bozzuto, Evan H. Campbell Grant, Sam S. Cruickshank, Matthew C. Fisher, Jacob C. Koella, Stefan Lötters, An Martel, Frank Pasmans, Benjamin C. Scheele, Annemarieke Spitzen-Van Der Sluijs, Sebastian Steinfartz, Benedikt R. Schmidt & Ben C. Scheele
1.Conservation science can be most effective in its decision-support role when seeking answers to clearly formulated questions of direct management relevance. Emerging wildlife diseases, a driver of global biodiversity loss, illustrate the challenges of performing this role: in spite of considerable research, successful disease mitigation is uncommon. Decision analysis is increasingly advocated to guide mitigation planning, but its application remains rare. 2.Using an integral projection model, we explored potential mitigation actions for avoiding population declines...

Data from: Population genomics analyses of European ibex species show lower diversity and higher inbreeding in reintroduced populations

Christine Grossen, Iris Biebach, Samer Angelone-Alasaad, Lukas F. Keller & Daniel Croll
Restoration of lost species ranges to their native distribution is key for the survival of endangered species. However, reintroductions often fail and long-term genetic consequences are poorly understood. Alpine ibex (Capra ibex) are wild goats that recovered from <100 individuals to ~50,000 within a century by population reintroductions. We analyzed the population genomic consequences of the Alpine ibex reintroduction strategy. We genotyped 101'822 genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism loci in 173 Alpine ibex, the closely related...

Data from: No evidence of inbreeding depression in sperm performance traits in wild song sparrows

Sylvain Losdat, Ryan R. Germain, Pirmin Nietlisbach, Peter Arcese & Jane M. Reid
Inbreeding is widely hypothesized to shape mating systems and population persistence, but such effects will depend on which traits show inbreeding depression. Population and evolutionary consequences could be substantial if inbreeding decreases sperm performance and hence decreases male fertilisation success and female fertility. However, the magnitude of inbreeding depression in sperm performance traits has rarely been estimated in wild populations experiencing natural variation in inbreeding. Further, the hypothesis that inbreeding could increase within-ejaculate variation in...

Data from: Patterns of earthworm, enchytraeid and nematode diversity and community structure in urban soils of different ages

Joël Amossé, Klára Dózsa-Farkas, Gergely Boros, Guy Rochat, Gauthier Sandoz, Bertrand Fournier, Edward A.D. Mitchell & Renée-Claire Le Bayon
Annelids (Lumbricidae and Enchytraeidae) and nematodes are common soil organisms and play important roles in organic matter decomposition, nutrient cycling and creation of soil structure and porosity. However, these three groups have rarely been studied together and only few studies exist for urban soils. We studied the diversity and community composition of annelids and nematodes in soils spanning more than two centuries of urban soil development in Neuchâtel (Switzerland) and assessed the relationships 1) among...

Data from: The nature and distribution of affiliative behaviour during exposure to mild threat

Guillaume Dezecache, Julie Grezes & Christoph D. Dahl
Individual reactions to danger in humans are often characterized as antisocial and self-preservative. Yet, more than fifty years of research have showed that humans often seek social partners and behave pro-socially when confronted by danger.Yet, more than fifty years of research have showed that humans seek social partners and behave pro-socially when confronted by danger. This research has relied on post-hoc verbal reports, which fall short of capturing the more spontaneous reactions to danger and...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    10

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    10

Affiliations

  • University of Neuchâtel
    10
  • University of Lausanne
    4
  • University of Zurich
    3
  • Ghent University
    1
  • University of California System
    1
  • University of Aberdeen
    1
  • Australian National University
    1
  • Eötvös Loránd University
    1
  • St Mary's Hospital
    1
  • Louis Bolk Instituut
    1