24 Works

Data from: Double-digest RAD Sequencing using Ion Proton semiconductor platform (ddRADseq-ion) with non-model organisms

Hans Recknagel, Arne Jacobs, Pawel Herzyk & Kathryn R. Elmer
Research in evolutionary biology involving nonmodel organisms is rapidly shifting from using traditional molecular markers such as mtDNA and microsatellites to higher throughput SNP genotyping methodologies to address questions in population genetics, phylogenetics and genetic mapping. Restriction site associated DNA sequencing (RAD sequencing or RADseq) has become an established method for SNP genotyping on Illumina sequencing platforms. Here, we developed a protocol and adapters for double-digest RAD sequencing for Ion Torrent (Life Technologies; Ion Proton,...

Data from: Eye coding mechanisms in early human face event-related potentials

Guillaume A. Rousselet, Robin A. A. Ince, Nicola J. Van Rijsbergen & Philippe G. Schyns
In humans, the N170 event-related potential (ERP) is an integrated measure of cortical activity that varies in amplitude and latency across trials. Researchers often conjecture that N170 variations reflect cortical mechanisms of stimulus coding for recognition. Here, to settle the conjecture and understand cortical information processing mechanisms, we unraveled the coding function of N170 latency and amplitude variations in possibly the simplest socially important natural visual task: face detection. On each experimental trial, 16 observers...

Data from: Are molecular markers useful predictors of adaptive potential?

Elizabeth A. Mittell, Shinichi Nakagawa & Jarrod D. Hadfield
Estimates of molecular genetic variation are often used as a cheap and simple surrogate for a population's adaptive potential, yet empirical evidence suggests they are unlikely to be a valid proxy. However, this evidence is based on molecular genetic variation poorly predicting estimates of adaptive potential rather than how well it predicts true values. As a consequence, the relationship has been systematically underestimated and the precision with which it could be measured severely overstated. By...

Data from: Indirect effects of parasitism: costs of infection to other individuals can be greater than direct costs borne by the host

Hanna M. V. Granroth-Wilding, Sarah J. Burthe, Sue Lewis, Katherine A. Herborn, Emi A. Takahashi, Francis Daunt & Emma J. A. Cunningham
Parasitic infection has a direct physiological cost to hosts but may also alter how hosts interact with other individuals in their environment. Such indirect effects may alter both host fitness and the fitness of other individuals in the host's social network, yet the relative impact of direct and indirect effects of infection are rarely quantified. During reproduction, a host's social environment includes family members who may be in conflict over resource allocation. In such situations,...

Data from: Plasma markers of oxidative stress are uncorrelated in a wild mammal

Louise L. Christensen, Colin Selman, Jonathan D. Blount, Jill G. Pilkington, Kathryn A. Watt, Josephine M. Pemberton, Jane M. Reid & Daniel H. Nussey
Oxidative stress, which results from an imbalance between the production of potentially damaging reactive oxygen species versus antioxidant defenses and repair mechanisms, has been proposed as an important mediator of life-history trade-offs. A plethora of biomarkers associated with oxidative stress exist, but few ecological studies have examined the relationships among different markers in organisms experiencing natural conditions or tested whether those relationships are stable across different environments and demographic groups. It is therefore not clear...

Data from: Contrasting population genetic structure among freshwater-resident and anadromous lampreys: the role of demographic history, differential dispersal, and anthropogenic barriers to movement.

Fiona S. A. Bracken, A. Rus Hoelzel, John B. Hume & Martyn C. Lucas
The tendency of many species to abandon migration remains a poorly understood aspect of evolutionary biology that may play an important role in promoting species radiation by both allopatric and sympatric mechanisms. Anadromy inherently offers an opportunity for the colonization of freshwater environments, and the shift from an anadromous to a wholly freshwater life history has occurred in many families of fishes. Freshwater-resident forms have arisen repeatedly among lampreys (within the Petromyzontidae and Mordaciidae), and...

Data from: Three dimensional tracking of a wide-ranging marine predator: flight heights and vulnerability to offshore wind farms

Ian R. Cleasby, Ewan D. Wakefield, Stuart Bearhop, Thomas W. Bodey, Stephen C. Votier & Keith C. Hamer
A large increase in offshore wind turbine capacity is anticipated within the next decade, raising concerns about possible adverse impacts on birds as a result of collision risk. Birds’ flight heights greatly influence this risk, yet height estimates are currently available only using methods such as radar- or ship-based observations over limited areas. Bird-borne data-loggers have the potential to provide improved estimates of collision risk and here, we used data from Global Position System (GPS)-loggers...

Data from: The evolutionary legacy of size-selective harvesting extends from genes to populations

Silva Uusi-Heikkilä, Andrew R. Whiteley, Anna Kuparinen, Shuichi Matsumura, Paul A. Venturelli, Christian Wolter, Jon Slate, Craig R. Primmer, Thomas Meinelt, Shaun S. Killen, David Bierbach, Giovanni Polverino, Arne Ludwig & Robert Arlinghaus
Size-selective harvesting is assumed to alter life histories of exploited fish populations, thereby negatively affecting population productivity, recovery, and yield. However, demonstrating that fisheries-induced phenotypic changes in the wild are at least partly genetically determined has proved notoriously difficult. Moreover, the population-level consequences of fisheries-induced evolution are still being controversially discussed. Using an experimental approach, we found that five generations of size-selective harvesting altered the life histories and behavior, but not the metabolic rate, of...

Water chemistry, hydrology and fluvial carbon data for two Amazonian small streams

L. E. Vihermaa & S. Waldron
The data are concentrations of different fluvial carbon species (dissolved inorganic carbon, dissolved organic carbon and particulate organic carbon) which form part of the lateral transport of carbon from the terrestrial to aquatic system. This influences the terrestrial carbon balance as well as being a key part of the freshwater carbon cycle. The submission also contains hydrological (stage height, discharge and water temperature) and water chemistry data (pH, conductivity and oxygen saturation). The data were...

Data from: Male sexually coercive behaviour drives increased swimming efficiency in female guppies

Shaun S. Killen, Darren P. Croft, Karine Salin & Safi K. Darden
Sexual coercion of females by males is widespread across sexually reproducing species. It stems from a conflict of interest over reproduction and exerts selective pressure on both sexes. For females, there is often a significant energetic cost of exposure to male sexually coercive behaviours. Our understanding of the efficiency of female resistance to male sexually coercive behaviour is key to understanding how sexual conflict contributes to population level dynamics and ultimately to the evolution of...

Data from: A robust and representative lower bound on object processing speed in humans

Magdalena M. Bieniek, Patrick J. Bennett, Allison B. Sekuler & Guillaume A. Rousselet
How early does the brain decode object categories? Addressing this question is critical to constrain the type of neuronal architecture supporting object categorization. In this context, much effort has been devoted to estimating face processing speed. With onsets estimated from 50 to 150 ms, the timing of the first face-sensitive responses in humans remains controversial. This controversy is due partially to the susceptibility of dynamic brain measurements to filtering distortions and analysis issues. Here, using...

Data from: Evaluation of two methods for minimally invasive peripheral body temperature measurement in birds

Andreas Nord, Marina Lehmann, Ross Macloed, Dominic J. McCafferty, Ruedi G. Nager, Jan-Åke Nilsson, Barbara Helm & Ross MacLeod
Body temperature (Tb) is a valuable parameter when assessing the physiological state of animals, but its widespread measurement is often constrained by methods that are invasive or require frequent recapture of animals. Alternatives based on automated remote sensing of peripheral Tb show promise, but little is known about their strengths and limitations. We measured peripheral Tb in great tits Parus major with subcutaneously implanted passive integrated transponders (PIT tags) and externally attached radio transmitters to...

Data from: Individuals with higher metabolic rates have lower levels of reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide in vivo

Karine Salin, Sonya K. Auer, Agata M. Rudolf, Graeme J. Anderson, Andrew G. Cairns, William Mullen, Richard C. Hartley, Colin Selman & Neil B. Metcalfe
There is increasing interest in the effect of energy metabolism on oxidative stress, but much ambiguity over the relationship between the rate of oxygen consumption and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Production of ROS (such as hydrogen peroxide, H2O2) in the mitochondria is primarily inferred indirectly from measurements in vitro, which may not reflect actual ROS production in living animals. Here, we measured in vivo H2O2 content using the recently developed MitoB probe...

Measures of peatland carbon cycling from peat mesocosm incubation experiments

H. Richardson, S. Waldron, J. Whitaker & N. Ostle
Data from two laboratory-based studies, both investigating the interactive effects of abiotic and biotic controls on peatland carbon cycling. Data comprise carbon dioxide and methane fluxes in peat, litter mass remaining and respiration rate data from litter bags on peat mesocosms, and biochemical and physical properties of peat. Data was collected in from the first laboratory study, which focused on identifying the interactive effects of small-scale temperature change, water table level and plant functional type...

Field measurements of peatland carbon cycling at a wind farm hosting peatland in Scotland, UK

A. Armstrong, H. Richardson, S. Waldron, N.J. Ostle & J. Whitaker
Data from a field-based investigation into the spatio-temporal variability of abiotic and biotic controls on peatland carbon cycling. Data was collected between February 2011 and April 2013, across an area of blanket bog peatland at Black Law Wind Farm, Lanarkshire, Scotland. Plant-soil properties data includes total carbon content, total nitrogen content and carbon to nitrogen ratio of vegetation, litter and peat, carbon and nitrogen stock for litter and peat, bulk density, soil moisture content, pH...

Data from: Voluntary locomotor activity mitigates oxidative damage associated with isolation stress in the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster)

Kelsey L. Fletcher, Brittany N. Whitley, Lisa A. Treidel, David Thompson, Annie Williams, Jose C. Noguera, Jennie R. Stevenson & Mark F. Haussmann
Organismal performance directly depends on an individual's ability to cope with a wide array of physiological challenges. For social animals, social isolation is a stressor that has been shown to increase oxidative stress. Another physiological challenge, routine locomotor activity, has been found to decrease oxidative stress levels. Because we currently do not have a good understanding of how diverse physiological systems like stress and locomotion interact to affect oxidative balance, we studied this interaction in...

Data from: Multiple stressors in a top predator seabird: potential ecological consequences of environmental contaminants, population health and breeding conditions

Jan Ove Bustnes, Sophie Bourgeon, Eliza H. K. Leat, Ellen Magnusdottir, Hallvard Strøm, Sveinn A. Hanssen, Aevar Petersen, Kristin Olafsdottir, Katrine Borgå, Geir W. Gabrielsen & Robert W. Furness
Environmental contaminants may have impacts on reproduction and survival in wildlife populations suffering from multiple stressors. This study examined whether adverse effects of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) increased with poor population health and breeding conditions in three colonies (60–74°N) of great skua (Stercorarius skua) in the north-eastern Atlantic (Shetland, Iceland and Bjørnøya [Bear Island]). POPs (organochlorines [OCs] and polybrominated diphenyl ethers [BDEs]) were measured in plasma of incubating birds (n = 222), concentrations differing nearly...

Data from: Perturbations in growth trajectory due to early diet affect age-related deterioration in performance

Who-Seung Lee, Pat Monaghan & Neil B. Metcalfe
Fluctuations in early developmental conditions can cause changes in growth trajectories that subsequently affect the adult phenotype. Here, we investigated whether compensatory growth has long-term consequences for patterns of senescence. Using three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus), we show that a brief period of dietary manipulation in early life affected skeletal growth rate not only during the manipulation itself, but also during a subsequent compensatory phase when fish caught up in size with controls. However, this growth...

Data from: Spatial averaging and disturbance lead to high productivity in aquatic metacommunities

Evangelia Smeti, Daniel L. Roelke & Sofie Spatharis
Dispersal in heterogeneous ecosystems, such as coastal metacommunities, is a major driver of diversity and productivity. According to theory, both species richness and spatial averaging shape a unimodal relationship of productivity with dispersal. We experimentally tested the hypothesis that disturbances acting on local patches would buffer the loss of productivity at high dispersal by preventing synchronized species oscillations. To simulate these disturbances, our experimental assemblages involved species that self-organized in isolation under three inflow pulsing...

Data from: Ocean acidification and temperature increase impacts mussel shell shape and thickness: problematic for protection?

Susan C. Fitzer, Liberty Vittert, Adrian Bowman, Nicholas A. Kamenos, Vernon R. Phoenix & Maggie Cusack
Ocean acidification threatens organisms that produce calcium carbonate shells by potentially generating an under-saturated carbonate environment. Resultant reduced calcification and growth, and subsequent dissolution of exoskeletons, would raise concerns over the ability of the shell to provide protection for the marine organism under ocean acidification and increased temperatures. We examined the impact of combined ocean acidification and temperature increase on shell formation of the economically important edible mussel Mytilus edulis. Shell growth and thickness along...

Data from: Parental age influences offspring telomere loss

Britt J. Heidinger, Katherine A. Herborn, Hanna M. V. Granroth-Wilding, Winnie Boner, Sarah Burthe, Mark Newell, Sarah Wanless, Francis Daunt, Pat Monaghan & Hanna M.V. Granroth-Wilding
The age of the parents at the time of offspring production can influence offspring longevity, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. The effect of parental age on offspring telomere dynamics (length and loss rate) is one mechanism that could be important in this context. Parental age might influence the telomere length that offspring inherit or age-related differences in the quality of parental care could influence the rate of offspring telomere loss. However, these routes...

Data from: Age, oxidative stress exposure and fitness in a long-lived seabird

Katherine A. Herborn, Francis Daunt, Britt J. Heidinger, Hanna M. V. Granroth-Wilding, Sarah J. Burthe, Mark A. Newell & Pat Monaghan
The need to manage exposure to oxidative stress, which can damage macromolecules, is thought to influence the resolution of life history trade-offs. Oxidative damage is expected to increase with age as a consequence of changes in the optimal investment in defences or repair, and/or because of senescence in antioxidant defence systems, though the pattern might differ between short and long-lived species. However, data on age related changes in damage levels in wild populations are rare....

Data from: A benign juvenile environment reduces the strength of antagonistic pleiotropy and genetic variation in the rate of senescence

Sin-Yeon Kim, Neil B. Metcalfe & Alberto Velando
1. The environment can play an important role in the evolution of senescence because the optimal allocation between somatic maintenance and reproduction depends on external factors influencing life expectancy. 2. The aims of this study were to experimentally test whether environmental conditions during early life can shape senescence schedules, and if so, to examine whether variation among individuals or genotypes with respect to the degree of ageing differs across environments. 3. We tested life-history plasticity...

CO2 efflux and hydraulic data for two Scottish and four Amazonian streams 2011-13

H. Long, L. Vihermaa, S. Waldron, T. Hoey, S. Quemin & J. Newton
The dataset contains CO2 efflux, hydraulic and water chemistry data from six field sites which vary in location, size and catchment characteristics. Measurements were made at: i) two sites in the UK - the River Kelvin (335 km2, semi-urban catchment) and Drumtee water (9.6 km2, peat dominated catchment); ii) four sites in the Peruvian Amazon - Main Trail (5 km2, seasonally active stream in a rainforest catchment), New Colpita stream (7 km2, perennial stream in...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    24

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    24

Affiliations

  • University of Glasgow
    24
  • University of Edinburgh
    5
  • Centre for Ecology and Hydrology
    3
  • University of Exeter
    3
  • Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
    2
  • UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
    2
  • Lancaster University
    2
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    1
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst
    1
  • Bucknell University
    1