21 Works

Data from: 2b-RAD genotyping for population genomic studies of Chagas disease vectors: Rhodnius ecuadoriensis in Ecuador

Luis Enrique Hernandez Castro, Marta Paterno, Anita G. Villacís, Björn Andersson, Jaime A. Costales, Michele De Noia, Sofía Ocaña-Mayorga, Cesar A. Yumiseva, Mario J. Grijalva, Martin S. Llewellyn & Luis E. Hernandez-Castro
Background: Rhodnius ecuadoriensis is the main triatomine vector of Chagas disease, American trypanosomiasis, in Southern Ecuador and Northern Peru. Genomic approaches and next generation sequencing technologies have become powerful tools for investigating population diversity and structure which is a key consideration for vector control. Here we assess the effectiveness of three different 2b restriction site-associated DNA (2b-RAD) genotyping strategies in R. ecuadoriensis to provide sufficient genomic resolution to tease apart microevolutionary processes and undertake some...

Data from: Pulse of inflammatory proteins in the pregnant uterus of European polecats (Mustela putorius) leading to the time of implantation

Heli Lindeberg, Richard J.S. Burchmore, Malcolm W. Kennedy & Richard J. S. Burchmore
Uterine secretory proteins protect the uterus and conceptuses against infection, facilitate implantation, control cellular damage resulting from implantation, and supply pre-implantation embryos with nutrients. Unlike in humans, the early conceptus of the European polecat (Mustela putorius; ferret) grows and develops free in the uterus until implanting at about 12 days after mating. We found that the proteins appearing in polecat uteri changed dramatically with time leading to implantation. Several of these proteins have also been...

Data from: Environmental conditions shape the temporal pattern of investment in reproduction and survival

Valeria Marasco, Winnie Boner, Kate Griffiths, Britt Heidinger & Pat Monaghan
The relationship between environmental stress exposure and ageing is likely to vary with stressor severity, life history stage, and the time scale over which effects are measured. Such factors could influence whether stress exposure accelerates or slows the ageing process, but their interactions have not previously been experimentally investigated. We found that experimental exposure of zebra finches to mildly challenging environmental circumstances from young to old adulthood, which increased exposure to stress hormones, reduced breeding...

Data from: Continent-level drivers of African pyrodiversity

Gareth P. Hempson, Catherine L. Parr, Sally Archibald, T. Michael Anderson, Colin J. Courtney Mustaphi, Andrew P. Dobson, Jason E. Donaldson, Thomas A. Morrison, James Probert & Colin M. Beale
Pyrodiversity, which describes fire variability over space and time, is believed to increase habitat heterogeneity and thereby promote biodiversity. However, to date there is no standardised metric for quantifying pyrodiversity, and so broad geographic patterns and drivers of pyrodiversity remain unexplored. We present the first generalizable method to quantify pyrodiversity, and use it to address the fundamental questions of what drives pyrodiversity, which fire attributes constrain pyrodiversity under different conditions, and whether pyrodiversity is spatial...

Data from: Contributions of local speech encoding and functional connectivity to audio-visual speech perception

Bruno L. Giordano, Robin A. A. Ince, Joachim Gross, Philippe G. Schyns, Stefano Panzeri & Christoph Kayser
Seeing a speaker’s face enhances speech intelligibility in adverse environments. We investigated the underlying network mechanisms by quantifying local speech representations and directed connectivity in MEG data obtained while human participants listened to speech of varying acoustic SNR and visual context. During high acoustic SNR speech encoding by temporally entrained brain activity was strong in temporal and inferior frontal cortex, while during low SNR strong entrainment emerged in premotor and superior frontal cortex. These changes...

Data from: Shorter juvenile telomere length is associated with higher survival to spawning in migratory Atlantic salmon

Darryl McLennan, John D. Armstrong, David C. Stewart, Simon Mckelvey, Winnie Boner, Pat Monaghan & Neil B. Metcalfe
The risk of mortality associated with a long-distance migration will depend on an animal's physiological state, as well as the prevailing ecological conditions. Here we assess whether juvenile telomere length, which in endotherms has been shown to be a biomarker of physiological state and expected lifespan, predicts whether wild Atlantic salmon Salmo salar successfully complete their marine migration. Over 1800 juvenile fish were trapped, measured, PIT-tagged and a tissue biopsy taken when migrating as juveniles...

Seasonal abundance data of all Culex pipiens life stages at a UK field site

D.A. Ewing, B.V. Purse, C.A. Cobbold, S.M. Schäfer & S.M. White
This dataset contains details of the seasonal abundance of each of the life stages of the mosquito species, Culex pipiens, at a field site located at the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology in Wallingford. Immature life stages (eggs, larvae and pupae) were monitored three times per week from March until October 2015, whilst adult counts were taken four times per week from April until October in the same year. Immature Cx. pipiens were monitored using...

Data from: Persistent anthrax as a major driver of wildlife mortality in a tropical rainforest

Constanze Hoffmann, Fee Zimmermann, Roman Biek, Hjalmar Kuehl, Kathrin Nowak, Roger Mundry, Anthony Agbor, Samuel Angedakin, Mimi Arandjelovic, Anja Blankenburg, Gregory Brazolla, Katherine Corogenes, Emmanuel Couacy-Hymann, Tobias Deschner, Paula Dieguez, Karsten Dierks, Ariane Düx, Susann Dupke, Henk Eshuis, Pierre Formenty, Yisa Ginath Yuh, Annemarie Goedmakers, Jan Gogarten, Anne-Céline Granjon, Scott McGraw … & Fabian Leendertz
Anthrax is a globally significant animal disease and zoonosis. Despite this, current knowledge of anthrax ecology is largely limited to arid ecosystems, where outbreaks are most commonly reported. We reveal cryptic the dynamics of an anthrax causing agent, Bacillus cereus biovar anthracis, in a tropical rainforest with severe consequences for local wildlife communities. Using data and samples collected over three decades we found that rainforest anthrax is a persistent and widespread cause of death for...

Data from: Effects of age and reproductive status on individual foraging site fidelity in a long-lived marine predator

Stephen C. Votier, Annette L. Fayet, Stuart Bearhop, Thomas W. Bodey, Bethany L. Clark, James Grecian, Tim Guilford, Keith C. Hamer, Jana W.E. Jeglinski, Greg Morgan, Ewan Wakefield, Samantha C. Patrick & Jana W. E. Jeglinski
Individual foraging specializations, where individuals use a small component of the population niche width, are widespread in nature with important ecological and evolutionary implications. In long-lived animals, foraging ability develops with age, but we know little about the ontogeny of individuality in foraging. Here we use precision global positioning system (GPS) loggers to examine how individual foraging site fidelity (IFSF), a common component of foraging specialization, varies between breeders, failed breeders and immatures in a...

Data from: The positive side of a negative reference: the delay between linguistic processing and common ground

Edmundo Kronmüller, Ira Noveck, Natalia Rivera, Francisco Jaume-Guazzini & Dale Barr
Interlocutors converge on names to refer to entities. For example, a speaker might refer to a novel looking object as the jellyfish and, once identified, the listener will too. The hypothesized mechanism behind such referential precedents is a subject of debate. The common ground view claims that listeners register the object as well as the identity of the speaker who coined the label. The linguistic view claims that, once established, precedents are treated by listeners...

Data from: Programmed and flexible: long-term Zugunruhe data highlight the many axes of variation in avian migratory behaviour

Benjamin M. Van Doren, Miriam Liedvogel & Barbara Helm
Studies of Zugunruhe – the ‘migratory restlessness’ behaviour of captive birds – have been integral to our understanding of animal migration, revealing an inherited propensity to migrate and an endogenous timing and navigation system. However, differences between Zugunruhe in captivity and migration in the wild call for more data, in particular on variation within and among taxa with diverse migration strategies. Here, we characterise Zugunruhe in a long-term dataset of activity profiles from stonechats (genus...

Data from: The use of clamping grips and friction pads by tree frogs for climbing curved surfaces

Thomas Endlein, Aihong Ji, Shanshan Yuan, Iain Hill, Huan Wang, W. Jon P. Barnes, Zhendong Dai & Metin Sitti
Most studies on the adhesive mechanisms of climbing animals have addressed attachment against flat surfaces, yet many animals can climb highly curved surfaces, like twigs and small branches. Here we investigated whether tree frogs use a clamping grip by recording the ground reaction forces on a cylindrical object with either a smooth or anti-adhesive, rough surface. Furthermore, we measured the contact area of fore and hindlimbs against differently sized transparent cylinders and the forces of...

Data from: Aggression supersedes individual oxygen demand to drive group air-breathing in a social catfish

Shaun S. Killen, Andrew J. Esbaugh, Nicolas Martins, F. Tadeau Rantin, David J. McKenzie, Nicolas F. Martins & F. Tadeu Rantin
1) Group-living is widespread among animals and comes with numerous costs and benefits. To date, research examining group-living has focused on trade-offs surrounding foraging, while other forms of resource acquisition have been largely overlooked. 2) Air breathing has evolved in many fish lineages, allowing animals to obtain oxygen in hypoxic aquatic environments. Breathing air increases the threat of predation, so some species perform group air breathing, to reduce individual risk. Within species, air breathing can...

Data from: Bayesian inference reveals positive but subtle effects of experimental fishery closures on marine predator demographics

Richard B. Sherley, Barbara J. Barham, Peter J. Barham, Kate J. Campbell, Robert J.M. Crawford, Jennifer Grigg, Catharine Horswill, Alistair McInnes, Taryn L. Morris, Lorien Pichegru, Antje Steinfurth, Florian Weller, Henning Winker, Stephen C. Votier & Cat Horswill
Global forage-fish landings are increasing, with potentially grave consequences for marine ecosystems. Predators of forage fish may be influenced by this harvest, but the nature of these effects is contentious. Experimental fishery manipulations offer the best solution to quantify population-level impacts, but are rare. We used Bayesian inference to examine changes in chick survival, body condition and population growth rate of endangered African penguins Spheniscus demersus in response to eight years of alternating time-area closures...

Data from: Linking social and spatial networks to viral community phylogenetics reveals subtype-specific transmission dynamics in African lions

Nicholas M. Fountain-Jones, Craig Packer, Jennifer L. Troyer, Kimberly VanderWaal, Stacie Robinson, Maude Jacquot & Meggan E. Craft
1.Heterogeneity within pathogen species can have important consequences for how pathogens transmit across landscapes; however, discerning different transmission routes is challenging. 2.Here we apply both phylodynamic and phylogenetic community ecology techniques to examine the consequences of pathogen heterogeneity on transmission by assessing subtype specific transmission pathways in a social carnivore. 3.We use comprehensive social and spatial network data to examine transmission pathways for three subtypes of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIVPle) in African lions (Panthera leo)...

Data from: Using host species traits to understand the consequences of resource provisioning for host–parasite interactions

Daniel J. Becker, Daniel G. Streicker & Sonia Altizer
1.Supplemental food provided to wildlife by human activities can be more abundant and predictable than natural resources, and subsequent changes to wildlife ecology can have profound impacts on host–parasite interactions. Identifying traits of species associated with increases or decreases in infection outcomes with resource provisioning could improve assessments of wildlife most prone to disease risks in changing environments. 2.We conducted a phylogenetic meta-analysis of 342 host–parasite interactions across 56 wildlife species and three broad taxonomic...

Data from: Predictors and immunological correlates of sublethal mercury exposure in vampire bats

Daniel J. Becker, Matthew M. Chumchal, Alexandra B. Bentz, Steven G. Platt, Gábor A. Czirják, Thomas R. Rainwater, Sonia Altizer & Daniel G. Streicker
Mercury (Hg) is a pervasive heavy metal that often enters the environment from anthropogenic sources such as gold mining and agriculture. Chronic exposure to Hg can impair immune function, reducing the ability of animals to resist or recover from infections. How Hg influences immunity and susceptibility remains unknown for bats, which appear immunologically distinct from other mammals and are reservoir hosts of many pathogens of importance to human and animal health. We here quantify total...

Data from: Links between parental life histories of wild salmon and the telomere lengths of their offspring

Darryl McLennan, John D. Armstrong, Dave C. Stewart, Simon Mckelvey, Winnie Boner, Pat Monaghan, Neil B. Metcalfe & David C. Stewart
The importance of parental contributions to offspring development and subsequent performance is self-evident at a genomic level; however, parents can also affect offspring fitness by indirect genetic and environmental routes. The life history strategy that an individual adopts will be influenced by both genes and environment; and this may have important consequences for offspring. Recent research has linked telomere dynamics (i.e. telomere length and loss) in early life to future viability and longevity. Moreover, a...

Data from: Do glucocorticoids predict fitness? Linking environmental conditions, corticosterone and reproductive success in the blue tit, Cyanistes caeruleus

Lindsay J. Henderson, Neil P. Evans, Britt J. Heidinger, Katherine A. Herborn & Kathryn E. Arnold
Glucocorticoids, including corticosterone (CORT), have been suggested to provide a physiological link between ecological conditions and fitness. Specifically, CORT, which is elevated in response to harsh conditions, is predicted to be correlated with reduced fitness. Yet, empirical studies show that CORT can be non-significantly, positively and negatively linked with fitness. Divergent environmental conditions between years or study systems may influence whether CORT is linked to fitness. To test this, we monitored free-living blue tits (Cyanistes...

Data from: The effects of sub-curative praziquantel treatment on life-history traits and trade-offs in drug-resistant Schistosoma mansoni

Mafalda Viana, Christina L. Faust, Dan T. Haydon, Joanne P. Webster, Poppy H. L. Lamberton & Daniel T. Haydon
Natural selection acts on all organisms, including parasites, to maximise reproductive fitness. Drug resistance traits are often associated with life-history costs in the absence of treatment. Schistosomiasis control programmes rely on mass drug administration to reduce human morbidity and mortality. Although hotspots of reduced drug efficacy have been reported, resistance is not widespread. Using Bayesian State-Space Models (SSMs) fitted to data from an in vivo laboratory system, we tested the hypothesis that the spread of...

Data from: PTEN controls glandular morphogenesis through a juxtamembrane β-Arrestin1/ARHGAP21 scaffolding complex

Arman Javadi, Ravi K. Deevi, Emma Evergren, Elodie Blondel-Tepaz, George S. Baillie, Mark G.H. Scott, Frederick Charles Campbell & Mark GH Scott
PTEN controls three-dimensional (3D) glandular morphogenesis by coupling juxtamembrane signalling to mitotic spindle machinery. While molecular mechanisms remain unclear, PTEN interacts through its C2 membrane-binding domain with the scaffold protein β-Arrestin1. Because β-Arrestin1 binds and suppresses the Cdc42 GTPase-activating protein ARHGAP21, we hypothesize that PTEN controls Cdc42-dependent morphogenic processes through a β-Arrestin1-ARHGAP21 complex. Here we show that PTEN knockdown (KD) impairs β-Arrestin1 membrane localization, β-Arrestin1-ARHGAP21 interactions, Cdc42 activation, mitotic spindle orientation and 3D glandular morphogenesis....

Registration Year

  • 2017
    21

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    21

Affiliations

  • University of Glasgow
    21
  • University of Georgia
    2
  • Marine Scotland
    2
  • University of Exeter
    2
  • University of York
    2
  • University of Liverpool
    2
  • University of Oxford
    2
  • Department of Agriculture
    1
  • University of Padua
    1
  • National Human Genome Research Institute
    1