105 Works

The Spawning behavior of Arctic charr video collection

Torvald B. Egeland, Ivar Folstad & Jarle Tryti Nordeide
The Spawning behavior of Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) collection contains video recordings from Lake Fjellfrøsvatnet (69°08′N 19°34′E), Troms, Northern Norway.\n\nThe study was carried out during the spawning period from mid‐September to early October. Video monitoring of spawning Arctic charr on their Lek sites was conducted at two known locations using six cameras.\n\nFor more information about the collection, please see the documentation data set: Egeland, Torvald B.; Folstad, Ivar; Nordeide, Jarle Tryti, 2021, "Documentation of the...

Data from: In silico site-directed mutagenesis informs species-specific predictions of chemical susceptibility derived from the Sequence Alignment to Predict Across Species Susceptibility (SeqAPASS) tool

Jon A. Doering, Sehan Lee, Kurt Kristiansen, Linn Evenseth, Mace G. Barron, Ingebrigt Sylte & Carlie A. LaLone
Chemical hazard assessment requires extrapolation of information from model organisms to all species of concern. The Sequence Alignment to Predict Across Species Susceptibility (SeqAPASS) tool was developed as a rapid, cost effective method to aid cross-species extrapolation of susceptibility to chemicals acting on specific protein targets through evaluation of protein structural similarities and differences. The greatest resolution for extrapolation of chemical susceptibility across species involves comparisons of individual amino acid residues at key positions involved...

Data from: Fish culling reduces tapeworm burden in Arctic charr by increasing parasite mortality rather than by reducing density‐dependent transmission

Eirik Haugstvedt Henriksen, André Frainer, Rune Knudsen, Roar Kristoffersen, Armand M. Kuris, Kevin D. Lafferty & Per-Arne Amundsen
1. Two common Dibothriocephalus (formerly Diphyllobothrium) tapeworm species were significantly reduced by experimental culling of their fish host Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) in a subarctic lake. 2. Between 1984 and 1991, funnel traps were used to cull ~ 35 metric tons of Arctic charr, reducing charr density by ~ 80%. As charr densities decreased, tapeworm prevalence and then intensity also declined over the following three decades, with D. dendriticus (formerly dendriticum) responding faster than D....

Data from: Seasonal difference in temporal transferability of an ecological model: near-term predictions of lemming outbreak abundances

Eivind F. Kleiven, John-André Henden, Rolf A. Ims & Nigel G. Yoccoz
Ecological models have been criticized for a lack of validation of their temporal transferability. Here we answer this call by investigating the temporal transferability of a dynamic state-space model developed to estimate season-dependent biotic and climatic predictors of spatial variability in outbreak abundance of the Norwegian lemming. Modelled summer and winter dynamics parametrized by spatial trapping data from one cyclic outbreak were validated with data from a subsequent outbreak. There was a distinct difference in...

Persistence of arctic-alpine flora during 24,000 years of environmental change in the Polar Urals

Charlotte Clarke, Mary Edwards, Ludovic Gielly, Dorothee Ehrich, Paul Hughes, Liudmila Morozova, Haflidi Haflidason, Jan Mangerud, John Inge Svendsen & Inger Alsos
Plants adapted to extreme conditions can be at high risk from climate change; arctic-alpine plants, in particular, could “run out of space” as they are out-competed by expansion of woody vegetation. Mountain regions could potentially provide safe sites for arctic-alpine plants in a warmer climate, but empirical evidence is fragmentary. Here we present a 24,000-year record of species persistence based on sedimentary ancient DNA (sedaDNA) from Lake Bolshoye Shchuchye (Polar Urals). We provide robust evidence...

Ancient horse genomes reveal the timing and extent of dispersals across the Bering Land Bridge

Alisa Vershinina, Peter Heintzman, Duane Froese, Grant Zazula, Molly Cassatt-Johnstone, Love Dalén, Clio Der Sarkissian, Shelby Dunn, Luca Ermini, Cristina Gamba, Pamela Groves, Joshua Kapp, Daniel Mann, Andaine Seguin-Orlando, John Southon, Mathias Stiller, Matthew Wooller, Gennady Baryshnikov, Dmitry Gimranov, Eric Scott, Elizabeth Hall, Susan Hewitson, Irina Kirillova, Pavel Kosintsev, Fedor Shidlovsky … & Beth Shapiro
The Bering Land Bridge (BLB) last connected Eurasia and North America during the Pleistocene. Although the BLB would have enabled transfers of terrestrial biota in both directions, it also acted as an ecological filter whose permeability varied considerably over time. Here we explore the possible impacts of this ecological corridor on genetic diversity within, and connectivity among, populations of a once wide-ranging group, the caballine horses (Equus spp.). Using a panel of 187 mitochondrial and...

Data from: Sámi knowledge and ecosystem-based adaptation strategies for managing pastures under threat from multiple land uses

Sigrid Engen & Vera Hausner
1. Ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) relies upon the capacity of ecosystems to buffer communities against the adverse impacts of climate change. Maintaining ecosystems that deliver critical services to communities can also provide co-benefits beyond adaptation, such as climate mitigation and protection of biological diversity and livelihoods. EbA has to a limited extent drawn upon indigenous-and local knowledge (ILK) for defining critical services and for implementing EbA in decision-making. This is a paradox given that the primary...

Experimentally increased snow depth affects High Arctic microarthropods inconsistently over two consecutive winters

Eveline Krab, Erik Lundin, Stephen Coulson, Ellen Dorrepaal & Elisabeth Cooper
Climate change induced alterations to winter conditions may affect decomposer organisms controlling the vast carbon stores in northern soils. Soil microarthropods are abundant decomposers in Arctic ecosystems affecting soil carbon release through their activities. We studied whether increased snow depth affected microarthropods, and if effects were consistent over two consecutive winters. We sampled Collembola and soil mites from a snow accumulation experiment at Svalbard in early summer and used soil microclimatic data to explore to...

Data from: A pioneering pest: the winter moth (Operophtera brumata) is expanding its outbreak range into low-arctic shrub tundra

Ole Petter Laksforsmo Vindstad, Jane Uhd Jepsen, Helge Molvig & Rolf Anker Ims
Climate warming allows generalist boreal consumers to expand into arctic ecosystems. We present experimental and observational field data showing that a generalist boreal insect pest – the winter moth (Operophtera brumata Linnaeus, 1758) – is expanding its outbreak range out of the northern-boreal mountain birch forest in northeast Fennoscandia and into the adjacent low-artic shrub tundra. This is the first documented example of an outbreaking boreal insect pest expanding into a tundra ecosystem. The expansion...

Molecular dietary analyses of western capercaillies (Tetrao urogallus) reveal a diverse diet

Physilia Chua, Youri Lammers, Emmanuel Menoni, Torbjørn Ekrem, Kristine Bohmann, Sanne Boessenkool & Inger Alsos
Conservation strategies centred around species habitat protection rely on species’ dietary information. One species at the focal point of conservation efforts is the herbivorous grouse, the western capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus), which is an indicator species for forest biodiversity conservation. Non-molecular means used to study their diet are time-consuming and at low taxonomic resolution. This delays the implementation of conservation strategies including resource protection due to uncertainty about its diet. Thus, limited knowledge on diet is...

Fat storage influences fasting endurance more than body size in an ungulate

L. Monica Trondrud, Gabriel Pigeon, Elżbieta Król, Steve Albon, Alina L. Evans, Walter Arnold, Catherine Hambly, R. Justin Irvine, Erik Ropstad, Audun Stien, Vebjørn Veiberg, John R. Speakman & Leif Egil Loe
1. The fasting endurance hypothesis (FEH) predicts strong selection for large body size in mammals living in environments where food supply is interrupted over prolonged periods of time. The Arctic is a highly seasonal and food restricted environment, but contrary to predictions from the FEH, empirical evidence shows that Arctic mammals are often smaller than their temperate conspecifics. Intraspecific studies integrating physiology and behaviour of different-sized individuals, may shed light on this paradox. 2. We...

State-space model for Svalbard ptarmigan

Filippo Marolla, John-Andre Henden, Eva Fuglei, Ashild Ønvik Pedersen, Mikhail Itkin & Rolf Anker Ims
To improve understanding and management of the consequences of current rapid environmental change, ecologists advocate using long-term monitoring data series to generate iterative near-term predictions of ecosystem responses. This approach allows scientific evidence to increase rapidly and management strategies to be tailored simultaneously. Iterative near-term forecasting may therefore be particularly useful for adaptive monitoring of ecosystems subjected to rapid climate change. Here, we show how to implement near-term forecasting in the case of a harvested...

Determinants of heart rate in Svalbard reindeer reveal mechanisms of seasonal energy management

L. Monica Trondrud, Gabriel Pigeon, Steve Albon, Walter Arnold, Alina L. Evans, R. Justin Irvine, Elżbieta Król, Erik Ropstad, Audun Stien, Vebjørn Veiberg, John R. Speakman & Leif Egil Loe
Seasonal energetic challenges may constrain an animal’s ability to respond to changing individual and environmental conditions. Here we investigated variation in heart rate, a well-established proxy for metabolic rate, in Svalbard reindeer, a species with strong seasonal changes in foraging and metabolic activity. In 19 adult females we recorded heart rate, subcutaneous temperature and activity using biologgers. Mean heart rate more than doubled from winter to summer. Typical drivers of energy expenditure, such as reproduction...

Capture-recapture dataset of Svalbard voles (1990-2007) with trap locations and rain-on-snow measurements

Dominique Fauteux, Audun Stien, Nigel G. Yoccoz, Eva Fuglei & Rolf A. Ims
Ecologists are still puzzled by the diverse population dynamics of herbivorous small mammals that range from high-amplitude, multi-annual cycles to stable dynamics. Theory predicts that this diversity results from combinations of climatic seasonality, weather stochasticity and density-dependent food web interactions. The almost ubiquitous 3-5-yr cycles in boreal and arctic climates may theoretically result from bottom-up (plant-herbivore) and top-down (predator-prey) interactions. Assessing empirically the roles of such interactions, and how they are influenced by environmental stochasticity,...

Data from: Nest attentiveness drives nest predation in arctic sandpipers

Nicolas Meyer, Loïc Bollache, François-Xavier Dechaume-Moncharmont, Jerôme Moreau, Eve Afonso, Anders Angerbjörn, Joël Bety, Dorothee Ehrich, Vladimir Gilg, Marie-Andrée Giroux, Jannik Hansen, Richard Lanctot, Johannes Lang, Nicolas Lecomte, Laura McKinnon, Jeroen Reneerkens, Sarah Saalfeld, Brigitte Sabard, Niels Schmidt, Benoît Sittler, Paul Smith, Aleksandr Sokolov, Vasiliy Sokolov, Natalya Sokolova, Rob Van Bemmelen … & Olivier Gilg
Most birds incubate their eggs to allow embryo development. This behaviour limits the ability of adults to perform other activities. Hence, incubating adults trade-off incubation and nest protection with foraging to meet their own needs. Parents can either cooperate to sustain this trade-off or incubate alone. The main cause of reproductive failure at this reproductive stage is predation and adults reduce this risk by keeping the nest location secret. Arctic sandpipers are interesting biological models...

Metagenomics: A viable tool for reconstructing herbivore diet

Physilia Chua, Alex Crampton-Platt, Youri Lammers, Inger Alsos, Sanne Boessenkool & Kristine Bohmann
Metagenomics can generate data on the diet of herbivores, without the need for primer selection and PCR enrichment steps as is necessary in metabarcoding. Metagenomic approaches to diet analysis have remained relatively unexplored, requiring validation of bioinformatic steps. Currently, no metagenomic herbivore diet studies have utilised both chloroplast and nuclear markers as reference sequences for plant identification, which would increase the number of reads that could be taxonomically informative. Here, we explore how in silico...

Resource-driven colonization by cod in a high Arctic food web

Edda Johannesen, Nigel Yoccoz, Torkild Tveraa, Nancy Shackell, Kari Ellingsen, Andrey Dolgov & Kenneth Frank
Climate change is commonly associated with many species redistributions and the influence of other factors may be marginalized, especially in the rapidly warming Arctic. The Barents Sea, a high latitude large marine ecosystem in the Northeast Atlantic has experienced above average temperatures since the mid 2000’s with divergent bottom temperature trends at sub-regional scales. Concurrently, the Barents Sea stock of Atlantic cod Gadus morhua, one of the most important commercial fish stocks in the world,...

Fine-scale spatial segregation in a pelagic seabird driven by differential use of tidewater glacier fronts

Philip Bertrand, Joël Bêty, Nigel Gilles Yoccoz, Marie-Josée Fortin, Hallvard Strøm, Harald Steen, Jack Kohler, Stephanie M. Harris, Samantha C. Patrick, Olivier Chastel, Pierre Blévin, Haakon Hop, Geir Moholdt, Joséphine Maton & Sébastien Descamps
In colonially breeding marine predators, individual movements and colonial segregation are influenced by seascape characteristics. Tidewater glacier fronts are important features of the Arctic seascape and are often described as foraging hotspots. Albeit their documented importance for wildlife, little is known about their structuring effect on arctic predator movements and space use. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that tidewater glacier fronts can influence marine bird foraging patterns and drive spatial segregation among adjacent...

GMBA Mountain Inventory v2

Mark A. Snethlage, Jonas Geschke, Eva M. Spehn, Ajay Ranipeta, Nigel G. Yocco, Christian Körner, Walter Jetz, Markus Fischer & Davnah Urbach
A standardized delineation of the worlds’ mountains has many applications in research, education, and the science-policy interface. Here we provide a new inventory of 8616 mountain ranges developed under the auspices of the Global Mountain Biodiversity Assessment (GMBA). Building on an earlier compilation, the presented geospatial database uses a further advanced and generalized mountain definition and a semi-automated method to enable globally standardized, transparent delineations of mountain ranges worldwide. The inventory is presented on EarthEnv...

Range-wide occurrence records of the subarctic copepod Calanus finmarchicus and associated environmental predictor variables

Jennifer J Freer, Malin Daase & Geraint A Tarling
This dataset contains occurrence records and associated metadata for the zooplankton species Calanus finmarchicus that were compiled from multiple open access databases. A file containing the corresponding background points is provided, along with gridded environmental variables for each season (Jan-Feb-Mar, Apr-May-Jun, Jul-Aug-Sep, Oct-Nov-Dec) and era (1955-1984, 1985-2017) that were assessed in this study. Together these data were used as input files for the MaxEnt ecological niche model within the peer reviewed article: Freer JJ, Daase,...

Benthic functional diversity using imagery from drop down live camera feed in the Norwegian part of the Barents Sea in 2017

Terri A. Souster & David Barnes
Multiple images of the seafloor at six sites across a broad latitudinal range in the Barents Sea in the Arctic were collected in July 2017 on the month long scientific cruise JR16006. The dataset includes environmental variables for each accompanied image. Each image (406 x 341mm) has density of fauna from different functional groups. We have 13 different functional groups based on other similar studies. The aim was to look at the effect of climate...

Data from: Seasonal dietary shifts enhance parasite transmission to lake salmonids during ice cover

Sebastian Prati, Eirik H. Henriksen, Rune Knudsen & Per‐Arne Amundsen
Changes in abiotic and biotic factors between seasons in subarctic lake systems are often profound, potentially affecting the community structure and population dynamics of parasites over the annual cycle. However, few winter studies exist and interactions between fish hosts and their parasites are typically confined to snapshot studies restricted to the summer season whereas host-parasite dynamics during the ice-covered period rarely have been explored. The present study addresses seasonal patterns in the infections of intestinal...

Data from: Environmental conditions alter successional trajectories on an ephemeral resource: a field experiment with beetles in dead wood

Ole Petter Laksforsmo Vindstad, Tone Birkemoe, Rolf Anker Ims & Anne Sverdrup-Thygeson
Successional processes can be observed for many organisms and resources, but most studies of succession have focused on plants. A general framework has been proposed, advocating that successional patterns in species turnover are predominantly driven by competition, dispersal or abiotic limitation, and that the patterning of species accumulation over time gives clues to which process is most influential in a given system. We applied this framework to succession in communities of wood-living beetles, utilizing ephemeral...

Data from: Temperature does not influence functional response of amphipods consuming different trematode prey

Ana Born-Torrijos, Rachel A. Paterson, Gabrielle S. Van Beest, Jessica Schwelm, Tereza Vyhlídalová, Eirik H. Henriksen, Rune Knudsen, Roar Kristoffersen, Per-Arne Amundsen & Miroslava Soldánová
Direct consumption on free-living cercariae stages of trematodes by non-host organisms interferes with trematode transmission and leads to reduced infections in the next suitable hosts. Consumer functional responses provide a useful tool to examine relationships between consumption rates and ecologically relevant prey densities, whilst also accounting for abiotic factors that likely influence consumption rates. We investigated how temperature influences the consumer functional response of the amphipod Gammarus lacustris towards the cercariae of three freshwater trematodes...

Data from: Can novel pest outbreaks drive ecosystem transitions in northern-boreal birch forest?

Ole Petter Laksforsmo Vindstad, Jane Uhd Jepsen, Malin Ek, Adam Pepi & Rolf Anker Ims
1. The boreal biome exhibits distinct alternative ecosystem states with high and low levels of tree-cover. Insect outbreaks facilitated by climate warming could potentially drive transitions from high to low tree-cover states. We investigated whether two key premises for such outbreak-induced transitions – critical thresholds (tipping points) and positive feedbacks that could maintain alternative states – are present in the northern-boreal mountain birch forest of Fennoscandia. Here, climate warming has promoted range expansions of defoliating...

Registration Year

  • 2022
    10
  • 2021
    26
  • 2020
    18
  • 2019
    16
  • 2018
    12
  • 2017
    6
  • 2016
    4
  • 2015
    10
  • 2014
    2
  • 2013
    1

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    99
  • Collection
    2
  • Journal Article
    2
  • Text
    2

Affiliations

  • The Arctic University of Norway
    88
  • Norwegian Institute for Nature Research
    23
  • UiT The Arctic University of Norway
    13
  • Norwegian Institute of Marine Research
    8
  • University of Oslo
    7
  • Norwegian Polar Institute
    6
  • Université de Sherbrooke
    5
  • University of Tromsø - The Arctic University of Norway
    5
  • University Centre in Svalbard
    5
  • Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research
    5