6 Works

Data from: Consequences of grazer-induced vegetation transitions on ecosystem carbon storage in the tundra

Henni Ylänne, Johan Olofsson, Lauri Oksanen & Sari Stark
1. Large herbivores can control plant community composition and, under certain conditions, even induce vegetation shifts to alternative ecosystem states. As different plant assemblages maintain contrasting carbon (C) cycling patterns, herbivores have the potential to alter C sequestration at regional scales. Their influence is of particular interest in the Arctic tundra, where a large share of the world’s soil C reservoir is stored. 2. We analysed how grazing mammals influence tundra vegetation and how grazer-induced...

Data from: Genetics redraws pelagic biogeography of Calanus

Marvin Choquet, Maja Hatlebakk, Anusha K.S. Dhanasiri, Ksenia Kosobokova, Irina Smolina, Janne E. Søreide, Camilla Svensen, Webjørn Melle, Sławomir Kwaśniewski, Ketil Eiane, Malin Daase, Vigdis Tverberg, Stig Skreslet, Ann Bucklin & Galice Hoarau
Planktonic copepods of the genus Calanus play a central role in North Atlantic/Arctic marine food webs. Here, using molecular markers, we redrew the distributional ranges of Calanus species inhabiting the North Atlantic and Arctic Oceans and revealed much wider and more broadly overlapping distributions than previously described. The Arctic shelf species, C. glacialis, dominated the zooplankton assemblage of many Norwegian fjords, where only C. finmarchicus has been reported previously. In these fjords, high occurrences of...

Data from: NOS: a software suite to compute node overlap and segregation in ecological networks

Giovanni Strona, Thomas Joseph Matthews, Susanne Kortsch & Joseph A. Veech
Investigating the structure of ecological networks can help unravel the mechanisms promoting and maintaining biodiversity. Recently, Strona and Veech (10.1111/2041-210X.12395) introduced a new metric (Ɲ ̅, pronounced ‘nos’), that allows assessment of structural patterns in networks ranging from complete node segregation to perfect nestedness, and that also provides a visual and quantitative assessment of the degree of network modularity. The Ɲ ̅ metric permits testing of a wide range of hypotheses regarding the tendency for...

Data from: Arctic greening from warming promotes declines in caribou populations

Per Fauchald, Taejin Park, Hans Tømmervik, Ranga Myneni & Vera Helene Hausner
The migratory tundra caribou herds in North America follow decadal population cycles, and browsing from abundant caribou could be expected to counteract the current climate-driven expansion of shrubs in the circumpolar tundra biome. We demonstrate that the sea ice cover in the Arctic Ocean has provided a strong signal for climate-induced changes on the adjacent caribou summer ranges, outperforming other climate indices in explaining the caribou-plant dynamics. We found no evidence of a negative effect...

Data from: Long-term environmental monitoring for assessment of change: measurement inconsistencies over time and potential solutions

Kari E. Ellingsen, Nigel G. Yoccoz, Torkild Tveraa, Judi E. Hewitt & Simon F. Thrush
The importance of long-term environmental monitoring and research for detecting and understanding changes in ecosystems and human impacts on natural systems is widely acknowledged. Over the last decades a number of critical components for successful long-term monitoring have been identified. One basic component is quality assurance/quality control protocols to ensure consistency and comparability of data. In Norway, the authorities require environmental monitoring of the impacts of the offshore petroleum industry on the Norwegian continental shelf,...

Data from: Quantifying individual heterogeneity and its influence on life-history trajectories: different methods for different questions and contexts

Sandra Hamel, Jean-Michel Gaillard, Mathieu Douhard, Marco Festa-Bianchet, Fanie Pelletier & Nigel G. Yoccoz
Heterogeneity among individuals influences the life-history trajectories we observe at the population level because viability selection, selective immigration and emigration processes, and ontogeny change the proportion of individuals with specific trait values with increasing age. Here, we review the two main approaches that have been proposed to account for these processes in life-history trajectories, contrasting how they quantify ontogeny and selection, and proposing ways to overcome some of their limitations. Nearly all existing approaches to...

Registration Year

  • 2017
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • The Arctic University of Norway
    6
  • Université de Sherbrooke
    1
  • Polish Academy of Sciences
    1
  • Center for Northern Studies
    1
  • University of Lyon System
    1
  • University of Connecticut
    1
  • Joint Research Centre
    1
  • Nord University
    1
  • University of Birmingham
    1
  • University of Auckland
    1