95 Works

WEGE: A new metric for ranking locations for biodiversity conservation

Harith Farooq, Josué Andersson, Francesco Belluardo, Cristóvão Nanvonamuquitxo, Dominic Bennett, Justin Moat, Amadeu Soares, Søren Faurby & Alexandre Antonelli
Aim Effective policy making for biological conservation requires the identification and ranking of the most important areas for protection or management. One of the most frequently used systems for selecting priority areas is Key Biodiversity Areas (hereafter KBAs), developed by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN). However, KBAs cannot be used to rank areas, potentially limiting their use when limited funding is available. To tackle this shortcoming and facilitate spatial prioritization, here we...

Data from: Targeted enrichment of large gene families for phylogenetic inference: phylogeny and molecular evolution of photosynthesis genes in the Portullugo clade (Caryophyllales)

Abigail J. Moore, Jurriaan M. De Vos, Lillian P. Hancock, Eric Goolsby, Erika J. Edwards, Jurriaan M De Vos, Abigail J Moore, Lillian P Hancock & Erika J Edwards
Hybrid enrichment is an increasingly popular approach for obtaining hundreds of loci for phylogenetic analysis across many taxa quickly and cheaply. The genes targeted for sequencing are typically single-copy loci, which facilitate a more straightforward sequence assembly and homology assignment process. However, this approach limits the inclusion of most genes of functional interest, which often belong to multi-gene families. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of including large gene families in hybrid enrichment protocols for phylogeny...

Data from: A new generic system for the pantropical Caesalpinia group (Leguminosae)

Edeline Gagnon, Anne Bruneau, Colin E. Hughes, Luciano Paganucci De Queiroz, Gwilym P. Lewis & Luciano De Queiroz
The Caesalpinia group is a large pantropical clade of ca. 205 species in subfamily Caesalpinioideae (Leguminosae) in which generic delimitation has been in a state of considerable flux. Here we present new phylogenetic analyses based on five plastid and one nuclear ribosomal marker, with dense taxon sampling including 172 (84%) of the species and representatives of all previously described genera in the Caesalpinia group. These analyses show that the current classification of the Caesalpinia group...

Data from: Phylogenetic systematics of subtribe Spiranthinae (Orchidaceae: Orchidoideae: Cranichideae) based on nuclear and plastid DNA sequences of a nearly complete generic sample

Gerardo A. Salazar, Joao A.N. Batista, Lidia I. Cabrera, Cassio Van Den Berg, W. Mark Whitten, Eric C. Smidt, Cristiano R. Buzatto, Rodrigo B. Singer, Gunter Gerlach, Rolando Jimenez-Machorro, Jose A. Radins, Irma S. Insaurralde, Leonardo R.S. Guimaraes, Fabio De Barros, Francisco Tobar, Jose L. Linares, Ernesto Mujica, Robert L. Dressler, Mario A. Blanco, Eric Hagsater & Mark W. Chase
Subtribe Spiranthinae is the most species-rich lineage of terrestrial Neotropical orchids, encompassing > 500 species and 40 genera. We conducted maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses of DNA sequence data of plastid matK-trnK and trnL-trnF and nuclear ribosomal ITS sequences for 36 genera and 182 species of Spiranthinae plus appropriate outgroups. The results strongly support monophyly of Spiranthinae (minus Discyphus, Discyphinae and Galeottiella, Galeottiellinae) and five major lineages, namely monospecific Cotylolabium (sister to the...

Data from: The search for loci under selection: trends, biases and progress

Collin W Ahrens, Paul D Rymer, Adam Stow, Jason Bragg, Shannon Dillon, Kate D L Umbers, Rachael Y Dudaniec, Collin W. Ahrens, Paul D. Rymer, Kate D. L. Umbers & Rachael Y. Dudaniec
Detecting genetic variants under selection using FST outlier analysis (OA) and environmental association analyses (EAA) are popular approaches that provide insight into the genetic basis of local adaptation. Despite the frequent use of OA and EAA approaches and their increasing attractiveness for detecting signatures of selection, their application to field-based empirical data have not been synthesized. Here, we review 66 empirical studies that use Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in OA and EAA. We report trends...

Data from: The phylogeny and biogeography of Hakea (Proteaceae) reveals the role of biome shifts in a continental plant radiation

Marcel Cardillo, Peter H. Weston, Zoe K.M. Reynolds, Peter M. Olde, Austin R. Mast, Emily Lemmon, Alan Richard Lemmon, Lindell Bromham, Emily M. Lemmon, Alan R. Lemmon & Zoe K. M. Reynolds
The frequency of evolutionary biome shifts during diversification has important implications for our ability to explain geographic patterns of plant diversity. Recent studies present several examples of biome shifts, but whether frequencies of biome shifts closely reflect geographic proximity or environmental similarity of biomes remains poorly known. We explore this question by using phylogenomic methods to estimate the phylogeny of Hakea, a diverse Australian genus occupying a wide range of biomes. Model-based estimation of ancestral...

Data from: Genetic diversity maintained among fragmented populations of a tree undergoing range contraction

James S. Borrell, Nian Wang, Richard A. Nichols & Richard J. A. Buggs
Dwarf birch (Betula nana) has a widespread boreal distribution but has declined significantly in Britain where populations are now highly fragmented. We analysed the genetic diversity of these fragmented populations using markers that differ in mutation rate: conventional microsatellites markers (PCR-SSRs), RADseq generated transition and transversion SNPs (RAD-SNPs), and microsatellite markers mined from RADseq reads (RAD-SSRs). We estimated the current population sizes by census and indirectly, from the linkage disequilibrium found in the genetic surveys....

Data from: Origin of angiosperms and the puzzle of the Jurassic gap

Hong-Tao Li, Ting-Shuang Yi, Lian-Ming Gao, Peng-Fei Ma, Ting Zhang, Jun-Bo Yang, Matthew A. Gitzendanner, Peter W. Fritsch, Jie Cai, Yang Luo, Hong Wang, Michelle Van Der Bank, Shu-Dong Zhang, Qing-Feng Wang, Jian Wang, Zhi-Rong Zhang, Chao-Nan Fu, Jing Yang, Peter M. Hollingsworth, Mark W. Chase, Douglas E. Soltis, Pamela S. Soltis & De-Zhu Li
Angiosperms are by far the most species-rich clade of land plants, but their origin and early evolutionary history remain poorly understood. We reconstructed angiosperm phylogeny based on 80 genes from 2,881 plastid genomes representing 85% of extant families and all orders. With a well-resolved plastid tree and 62 fossil calibrations, we dated the origin of the crown angiosperms to the Upper Triassic, with major angiosperm radiations occurring in the Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous. This estimated...

Thermal niche traits of high alpine plant species and communities across the tropical Andes and their vulnerability to global warming

Francisco Cuesta & Carolina Tovar
Aim The Climate Variability Hypothesis (CVH) predicts that locations with reduced seasonal temperature variation select for species with narrower thermal ranges. Here we (1) test the CVH by assessing the effect of latitude and elevation on the thermal ranges of Andean vascular plant species and communities, and (2) assess tropical alpine plants vulnerability to warming based on their thermal traits. Location Tropical Andes Taxon Vascular plants Methods Temperature data for 505 vascular plant species from...

Fast diversification through a mosaic of evolutionary histories characterizes the endemic flora of ancient Neotropical mountains

Thais Vasconcelos, Suzana Alcantara, Caroline Andrino, Félix Forest, Marcelo Reginato, Marcelo Simon & José Pirani
Mountains are among the most biodiverse areas on the globe. In young mountain ranges, exceptional plant species-richness is often associated to recent and rapid radiations linked to the mountain uplift itself. In ancient mountains, however, orogeny vastly precedes the evolution of vascular plants, so species-richness has been explained by species accumulation during long periods of low extinction rates. Here we evaluate these assumptions by analyzing plant diversification dynamicsin thecampo rupestre, an ecosystem associated to pre-Cambrian...

Data from: Evolutionary diversity in tropical tree communities peaks at intermediate precipitation

Danilo M. Neves, Kyle G. Dexter, Timothy R. Baker, Fernanda Coelho De Souza, Ary T. Oliveira-Filho, Luciano P. Queiroz, Haroldo C. Lima, Marcelo F. Simon, Gwilym P. Lewis, Ricardo A. Segovia, Luzmila Arroyo, Carlos Reynel, José L. Marcelo-Peña, Isau Huamantupa-Chuquimaco, Daniel Villarroel, G. Alexander Parada, Aniceto Daza, Reynaldo Linares-Palomino, Leandro V. Ferreira, Rafael P. Salomão, Geovane S. Siqueira, Marcelo T. Nascimento, Claudio N. Fraga & R. Toby Pennington
Global patterns of species and evolutionary diversity in plants are primarily determined by a temperature gradient, but precipitation gradients may be more important within the tropics, where plant species richness is positively associated with the amount of rainfall. The impact of precipitation on the distribution of evolutionary diversity, however, is largely unexplored. Here we detail how evolutionary diversity varies along precipitation gradients by bringing together a comprehensive database on the composition of angiosperm tree communities...

Data from: Ecological speciation in sympatric palms: 2. pre- and post-zygotic isolation

H. Hipperson, L.T. Dunning, W.J. Baker, R.K. Butlin, I. Hutton, A.S.T. Papadopulos, C.M. Smadja, T.C. Wilson, C. Devaux, Vincent Savolainen, R. K. Butlin, T. C. Wilson, W. J. Baker, A. S. T. Papadopulos & V. Savolainen
We evaluated reproductive isolation in two species of palms (Howea) that have evolved sympatrically on Lord Howe Island (LHI, Australia). We estimated the strength of some pre- and post-zygotic mechanisms in maintaining current species boundaries. We found that flowering time displacement between species is consistent across in and ex situ common gardens and is thus partly genetically determined. On LHI, pre-zygotic isolation due solely to flowering displacement was 97% for H. belmoreana and 80% for...

Plant dispersal strategies of high tropical alpine communities across the Andes

Carolina Tovar, Inga Melcher, Buntarou Kusumoto, Francisco Cuesta, Antoine Cleef, Rosa Isela Meneses, Stephan Halloy, Luis Daniel Llambi, Stephan Beck, Priscilla Muriel, Ricardo Jaramillo, Jorge Jacome & Julieta Carilla
• Dispersal is a key ecological process that influences plant community assembly. Therefore, understanding whether dispersal strategies are associated with climate is of utmost importance, particularly in areas greatly exposed to climate change. We examined alpine plant communities located in the mountain summits of the tropical Andes across a 4000 km latitudinal gradient. We investigated species dispersal strategies and tested their association with climatic conditions and their evolutionary history. • We used dispersal-related traits (dispersal...

Age-related pharmacodynamics in a bumblebee-microsporidian system mirror similar patterns in vertebrates

Arran J. Folly, Philip C. Stevenson & Mark J. F. Brown
Immune systems provide a key defence against diseases. However, they are not a panacea and so both vertebrates and invertebrates co-opt naturally occurring bioactive compounds to treat themselves against parasites and pathogens. In vertebrates this co-option is complex, with pharmacodynamics leading to differential effects of treatment at different life stages, which may reflect age-linked differences in the immune system. However, our understanding of pharmacodynamics in invertebrates is almost non-existent. Critically, this knowledge may elucidate broad...

Data from: Frugivory-related traits promote speciation of tropical palms

Renske E. Onstein, William J. Baker, Thomas L. P. Couvreur, Søren Faurby, Jens-Christian Svenning & W. Daniel Kissling
Animal-mediated seed dispersal by frugivorous birds and mammals is central to the ecology and functioning of ecosystems, but whether and how frugivory-related traits have affected plant speciation remains little explored. Fruit size is directly linked to plant dispersal capacity and therefore influences gene flow and genetic divergence of plant populations. Using a global species-level phylogeny with comprehensive data on fruit sizes and plant species distributions, we test whether fruit size has affected speciation rates of...

Data from: A new subfamily classification of the Leguminosae based on a taxonomically comprehensive phylogeny

, Anne Bruneau, Nasim Azani, Marielle Babineau, Edeline Gagnon, Carole Sinou, Royce Steeves, Erin Zimmerman, C. Donovan Bailey, Lynsey Kovar, Madhugiri Nageswara-Rao, Hannah Banks, RuthP. Clark, Manuel De La Estrella, Peter Gasson, GeoffreyC. Kite, BenteB. Klitgaard, GwilymP. Lewis, Danilo Neves, Gerhard Prenner, María De Lourdes Rico-Arce, ArianeR. Barbosa, Maria Cristina López-Roberts, Luciano Paganucci De Queiroz, PétalaG. Ribeiro … & Tingshuang Yi
The classification of the legume family proposed here addresses the long-known non-monophyly of the traditionally recognised subfamily Caesalpinioideae, by recognising six robustly supported monophyletic subfamilies. This new classification uses as its framework the most comprehensive phylogenetic analyses of legumes to date, based on plastid matK gene sequences, and including near-complete sampling of genera (698 of the currently recognised 765 genera) and ca. 20% (3696) of known species. The matK gene region has been the most...

Data from: Analysis of phylogenomic tree space resolves relationships among marsupial families

David A. Duchêne, Jason G. Bragg, Sebastian Duchêne, Linda E. Neaves, Sally Potter, Craig Moritz, Rebecca N. Johnson, Simon Y. W. Ho & Mark D. B. Eldridge
A fundamental challenge in resolving evolutionary relationships across the Tree of Life is to account for heterogeneity in the evolutionary signal across loci. Studies of marsupial mammals have demonstrated that this heterogeneity can be substantial, leaving considerable uncertainty in the evolutionary timescale and relationships within the group. Using simulations and a new phylogenomic data set comprising nucleotide sequences of 1550 loci from 18 of the 22 extant marsupial families, we demonstrate the power of a...

Data from: Environment and host as large-scale controls of ectomycorrhizal fungi

Sietse Van Der Linde, Laura M. Suz, C. David L. Orme, Filipa Cox, Henning Andreae, Endla Asi, Bonnie Atkinson, Sue Benham, Christopher Carroll, Nathalie Cools, Bruno De Vos, Hans-Peter Dietrich, Johannes Eichhorn, Joachim Germann, Tine Grebenc, Hyun S. Gweon, Karin Hansen, Frank Jacob, Ferdinand Kristöfel, Pawel Lech, Miklos Manninger, Jan Martin, Henning Meesenburg, Päivi Merilä, Manuel Nicolas … & Martin I. Bidartondo
Explaining the large-scale diversity of soil organisms that drive biogeochemical processes—and their responses to environmental change—is critical. However, identifying consistent drivers of belowground diversity and abundance for some soil organisms at large spatial scales remains problematic. Here we investigate a major guild, the ectomycorrhizal fungi, across European forests at a spatial scale and resolution that is—to our knowledge—unprecedented, to explore key biotic and abiotic predictors of ectomycorrhizal diversity and to identify dominant responses and thresholds...

Data from: Flower preferences and pollen transport networks for cavity nesting solitary bees: implications for the design of agri-environment schemes

Catherine E.A. Gresty, Elizabeth Clare, Dion S. Devey, Robyn S. Cowan, Laszlo Csiba, Panagiota Malakasi, Owen T. Lewis, Katherine J. Willis & Catherine E. A. Gresty
Floral foraging resources are valuable for pollinator conservation on farmland, and their provision is encouraged by agri-environment schemes in many countries. Across Europe, wildflower seed mixtures are widely sown on farmland to encourage pollinators, but the extent to which key pollinator groups such as solitary bees exploit and benefit from these resources is unclear. We used high-throughput sequencing of 164 pollen samples extracted from the brood cells of 6 common cavity nesting solitary bee species...

Data from: A universal probe set for targeted sequencing of 353 nuclear genes from any flowering plant designed using k-medoids clustering

Matthew G. Johnson, Lisa Pokorny, Steven Dodsworth, Laura R. Botigue, Robyn S. Cowan, Alison Devault, Wolf L. Eiserhardt, Niroshini Epitawalage, Félix Forest, Jan T. Kim, James Leebens-Mack, Ilia J. Leitch, Olivier Maurin, Doug Soltis, Pamela S. Soltis, Gane Ka-Shu Wong, William J. Baker, Norman Wickett & Gane Ka-Shu Wong
Sequencing of target-enriched libraries is an efficient and cost-effective method for obtaining DNA sequence data from hundreds of nuclear loci for phylogeny reconstruction. Much of the cost of developing targeted sequencing approaches is associated with the generation of preliminary data needed for the identification of orthologous loci for probe design. In plants, identifying orthologous loci has proven difficult due to a large number of whole-genome duplication events, especially in the angiosperms (flowering plants). We used...

Phylogeny, biogeography, and morphological evolution among and within the Neotropical and Asian clades of Schefflera (Araliaceae)

Gregory Plunkett, Porter Lowry, Pedro Fiaschi, David Frodin & Antoine Nicolas
Schefflera is the largest and most complex genus of Araliaceae, with ~600 described species (and many additional species awaiting formal description), but recent studies indicate that it is polyphyletic, forming five geographically centered clades spread across the major lineages of the family. Significant progress has been made in revising the three smallest clades, but the two largest groups, centered in Asia and the Neotropics, remain poorly understood. To advance our knowledge of these groups, a...

Extinction dynamics under extreme conservation threat: the flora of St Helena

Quentin Cronk & Phil Lambdon
The flora of the island of St Helena provides an amplified system for the study of extinction by reason of the island’s high endemism, small size, vulnerable biota, length of time of severe disturbance (since 1502) and severity of threats. Endemic plants have been eliminated from 96.5% of St Helena by habitat loss. There are eight recorded extinctions in the vascular flora since 1771 giving an extinction rate of 581 extinctions per million species per...

Data from: Seed size and the evolution of leaf defences

Thomas S. Kraft, S. Joseph Wright, Ian Turner, Peter W. Lucas, Christopher E. Oufiero, , I-Fang Sun, Nathaniel J. Dominy &
1. Leaf defences vary widely among tree species, affecting rates of herbivory, survival and reproduction. 2. Two contrasting hypotheses account for variation in leaf defences among species. The first predicts that a slow life history, which is characteristic of larger seeded species adapted to resource-limited environments, is associated with well-defended leaves. The second, apparency theory, predicts that elevated leaf defences are necessitated for species that are more detectable to herbivores. 3. Here we use comparative...

Data from: Interglacial microrefugia and diversification of a cactus species complex: phylogeography and palaeodistributional reconstructions for Pilosocereus aurisetus and allies

Isabel A. S. Bonatelli, Manolo F. Perez, A. Townsend Peterson, Nigel P. Taylor, Daniela C. Zappi, Marlon C. Machado, Ingrid Koch, Adriana H. C. Pires & Evandro M. Moraes
The role of Pleistocene climate changes in promoting evolutionary diversification in global biota is well documented, but the great majority of data regarding this subject come from North America and Europe, which were greatly affected by glaciation. The effects of Pleistocene changes on cold- and/or dry-adapted species in tropical areas where glaciers were not present remain sparsely investigated. Many such species are restricted to small areas surrounded by unfavourable habitats, which may represent potential interglacial...

Data from: ITS1 versus ITS2 as DNA metabarcodes for fungi

Rakel Blaalid, Surendra Kumar, R. Henrik Nilsson, Kessy Abarenkov, Paul M. Kirk, Håvard Kauserud, R. Blaalid, S. Kumar, H. Kauserud, R. H. Nilsson, P. M. Kirk & K. Abarenkov
The nuclear ribosomal Internal Transcribed Spacer ITS region is widely used as a DNA metabarcoding marker to characterize the diversity and composition of fungal communities. In amplicon pyrosequencing studies of fungal diversity, one of the spacers ITS1 or ITS2 of the ITS region is normally used. In this methodological study we evaluate the usability of ITS1 vs. ITS2 as a DNA metabarcoding marker for fungi. We analyse three data sets: two comprising ITS1 and ITS2...

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