11 Works

Data from: A new generic system for the pantropical Caesalpinia group (Leguminosae)

Edeline Gagnon, Anne Bruneau, Colin E. Hughes, Luciano Paganucci De Queiroz, Gwilym P. Lewis & Luciano De Queiroz
The Caesalpinia group is a large pantropical clade of ca. 205 species in subfamily Caesalpinioideae (Leguminosae) in which generic delimitation has been in a state of considerable flux. Here we present new phylogenetic analyses based on five plastid and one nuclear ribosomal marker, with dense taxon sampling including 172 (84%) of the species and representatives of all previously described genera in the Caesalpinia group. These analyses show that the current classification of the Caesalpinia group...

Data from: Ecological speciation in sympatric palms: 2. pre- and post-zygotic isolation

H. Hipperson, L.T. Dunning, W.J. Baker, R.K. Butlin, I. Hutton, A.S.T. Papadopulos, C.M. Smadja, T.C. Wilson, C. Devaux, Vincent Savolainen, R. K. Butlin, T. C. Wilson, W. J. Baker, A. S. T. Papadopulos & V. Savolainen
We evaluated reproductive isolation in two species of palms (Howea) that have evolved sympatrically on Lord Howe Island (LHI, Australia). We estimated the strength of some pre- and post-zygotic mechanisms in maintaining current species boundaries. We found that flowering time displacement between species is consistent across in and ex situ common gardens and is thus partly genetically determined. On LHI, pre-zygotic isolation due solely to flowering displacement was 97% for H. belmoreana and 80% for...

Data from: Comparative analysis of Begonia plastid genomes and their utility for species-level phylogenetics

Catherine Kidner, Nicola Harrison, Richard Harrison, Richard J. Harrison & Catherine A. Kidner
Recent, rapid radiations make species-level phylogenetics difficult to resolve. We used a multiplexed, high-throughput sequencing approach to identify informative genomic regions to resolve phylogenetic relationships at low taxonomic levels in Begonia from a survey of sixteen species. A long-range PCR method was used to generate draft plastid genomes to provide a strong phylogenetic backbone, identify fast evolving regions and provide informative molecular markers for species-level phylogenetic studies in Begonia.

Data from: Reducing wildlife damage with cost-effective management programmes

Cheryl R. Krull, Margaret C. Stanley, Bruce R. Burns, David Choquenot, Thomas E. Etherington & Thomas R. Etherington
Limiting the impact of wildlife damage in a cost effective manner requires an understanding of how control inputs change the occurrence of damage through their effect on animal density. Despite this, there are few studies linking wildlife management (control), with changes in animal abundance and prevailing levels of wildlife damage. We use the impact and management of wild pigs as a case study to demonstrate this linkage. Ground disturbance by wild pigs has become a...

Data from: Taxonomic notes on the genus Piper (Piperaceae)

Chalermpol Suwanphakdee, David A. Simpson, Trevor R. Hodkinson & Pranom Chantaranothai
Sixteen lectotypifications of Asian Piper species are provided. Piper argyrites, P. baccatum, P. leptostachyum, P. majusculum, P. peepuloides, P. quinqueangulatum and P. sulcatum are accepted as species and many new synonyms are proposed. Useful diagnostic characters are described and geographical distribution data of each species are provided.

Data from: Plant toxin levels in nectar vary spatially across native and introduced populations

Paul A. Egan, Phillip C. Stevenson, Erin Jo Tiedeken, Geraldine A. Wright, Fabio Boylan & Jane C. Stout
Secondary compounds in nectar can function as toxic chemical defences against floral antagonists, but may also mediate plant-pollinator interactions. Despite their ecological importance, few studies have investigated patterns of spatial variation in toxic nectar compounds in plant species, and none outside their native range. Grayanotoxin I (GTX I) occurs in nectar of invasive Rhododendron ponticum where it is toxic to honeybees and some solitary bee species. We examined (i) geographic variation in the composition of...

Data from: Evolutionary prediction of medicinal properties in the genus Euphorbia L.

Madeleine Ernst, C. Haris Saslis-Lagoudakis, Olwen M. Grace, Niclas Nilsson, Henrik Toft Simonsen, James W. Horn & Nina Rønsted
The current decrease of new drugs brought to the market has fostered renewed interest in plant-based drug discovery. Given the alarming rate of biodiversity loss, systematic methodologies in finding new plant-derived drugs are urgently needed. Medicinal uses of plants were proposed as proxy for bioactivity, and phylogenetic patterns in medicinal plant uses have suggested that phylogeny can be used as predictive tool. However, the common practice of grouping medicinal plant uses into standardised categories may...

Data from: X-rays and virtual taphonomy resolve the first Cissus (Vitaceae) macrofossils from Africa as early diverging members of the genus

Neil F. Adams, Margaret E. Collinson, Selena Y. Smith, Marion K. Bamford, Félix Forest, Panagiota Malakasi, Federica Marone, Dan Sykes, N. F. Adams, M. E. Collinson, D. Sykes, F. Forest, P. Malakasi, S. Y. Smith & M. K. Bamford
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Fossilized seeds similar to Cissus (Vitaceae) have been recognized from the Miocene of Kenya, though some were previously assigned to the Menispermaceae. We undertook a comparative survey of extant African Cissus seeds to identify the fossils and consider their implications for the evolution and biogeography of Cissus and for African early Miocene paleoenvironments. METHODS: Micro-computed tomography (µCT) and synchrotron-based X-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM) were used to study seed morphology and anatomy....

Data from: Ecological speciation in sympatric palms: 1. Gene expression, selection and pleiotropy

Luke T. Dunning, Helen Hipperson, William J. Baker, Roger K. Butlin, Céline Devaux, Ian Hutton, Javier Igea, Alexander S. T. Papadopulos, Xueping Quan, Carole M. Smadja, Colin G. N. Turnbull, Vincent Savolainen, R. K. Butlin, W. J. Baker, A. S. T. Papadopulos & V. Savolainen
Ecological speciation requires divergent selection, reproductive isolation, and a genetic mechanism to link the two. We examined the role of gene expression and coding sequence evolution in this process using two species of Howea palms that have diverged sympatrically on Lord Howe Island, Australia. These palms are associated with distinct soil types and have displaced flowering times, representing an ideal candidate for ecological speciation. We generated large amounts of RNA-Seq data from multiple individuals and...

Data from: Extensive variation, but not local adaptation in an Australian alpine daisy

Megan J. Hirst, Jason P. Sexton & Ary A. Hoffmann
Alpine plants often occupy diverse habitats within a similar elevation range, but most research on local adaptation in these plants has focused on elevation gradients. In testing for habitat-related local adaptation, local effects on seed quality and initial plant growth should be considered in designs that encompass multiple populations and habitats. We tested for local adaptation across alpine habitats in a morphologically variable daisy species, Brachyscome decipiens, in the Bogong High Plains in Victoria, Australia....

Data from: Quantification of population sizes of large herbivores and their long-term functional role in ecosystems using dung fungal spores

Ambroise G. Baker, Perry Cornelissen, Shonil Bhagwat, Fransciscus W. M. Vera, Katherine J. Willis & Shonil A. Bhagwat
The relationship between large herbivore numbers and landscape cover over time is poorly understood. There are two schools of thought: one views large herbivores as relatively passive elements upon the landscape and the other as ecosystem engineers driving vegetation succession. The latter relationship has been used as an argument to support reintroductions of large herbivores onto many landscapes in order to increase vegetation heterogeneity and biodiversity through local-scale disturbance regimes. Most of the research examining...

Registration Year

  • 2016
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  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Royal Botanic Gardens
    11
  • Trinity College
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  • University of Gothenburg
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  • Imperial College London
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  • University of Sheffield
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  • University of Greenwich
    1
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
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  • University of Groningen
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  • University of Montreal
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  • Natural History Museum
    1