46 Works

Data from: Within-species patterns challenge our understanding of the Leaf Economics Spectrum

Leander D.L. Anderegg, Logan T. Berner, Grayson Badgley, Meera L. Sethi, Beverly E. Law, Janneke HilleRisLambers & Leander D. L. Anderegg
The utility of plant functional traits for predictive ecology relies on our ability to interpret trait variation across multiple taxonomic and ecological scales. Using extensive datasets of trait variation within species, across species, and across communities, we analyzed whether and at what scales ‘leaf economics spectrum’ (LES) traits show predicted trait-trait covariation. We found that most variation in LES traits is often, but not universally, at high taxonomic levels (between families, between genera in a...

Data from: Quantifying the digestive fingerprints of predators on the bones of their prey using scanning electron microscopy

Rebecca C. Terry, Jesse A. Laney & Samuel H. Hay-Roe
Paleoecological reconstruction relies on accurately determining the taphonomic origin of fossil deposits. Predation is a common mechanism by which skeletal remains become concentrated over time, leading to the formation of modern and fossil prey death assemblages. Skeletal element representation and breakage patterns within such death assemblages can be used to infer the identity of the responsible predator. However, assemblage-level metrics cannot be used to infer if a single fossil specimen is predator-derived. Microscopic digestive etching...

Data from: Herbivory and eutrophication mediate grassland plant nutrient responses across a global climatic gradient

T. Michael Anderson, Daniel M. Griffith, James B. Grace, Eric M. Lind, Peter B. Adler, Lori A. Biederman, Dana M. Blumenthal, Pedro Daleo, Jennifer Firn, Nicole Hagenah, W. Stanley Harpole, Andrew S. MacDougall, Rebecca L. McCulley, Suzanne M. Prober, Anita C. Risch, Mahesh Sankaran, Martin Schütz, Eric W. Seabloom, Carly J. Stevens, Lauren L. Sullivan, Peter D. Wragg & Elizabeth T. Borer
Plant stoichiometry, the relative concentration of elements, is a key regulator of ecosystem functioning and is also being altered by human activities. In this paper we sought to understand the global drivers of plant stoichiometry and compare the relative contribution of climatic vs. anthropogenic effects. We addressed this goal by measuring plant elemental (C, N, P and K) responses to eutrophication and vertebrate herbivore exclusion at eighteen sites on six continents. Across sites, climate and...

Data from: Assessing changes in functional connectivity in a desert bighorn sheep metapopulation after two generations

Clinton W. Epps, Rachel S. Crowhurst & Brandon S. Nickerson
Determining how species move across complex and fragmented landscapes and interact with human-made barriers is a major research focus in conservation. Studies estimating functional connectivity from movement, dispersal, or gene flow usually rely on a single study period, and rarely consider variation over time. We contrasted genetic structure and gene flow across barriers for a metapopulation of desert bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis nelsoni) using genotypes collected 2000–2003 and 2013–2015. Based on the recently observed but...

Data from: Severe fire weather and intensive forest management increase fire severity in a multi-ownership landscape

Harold S.J. Zald, Christopher J. Dunn & Harold S. J. Zald
Many studies have examined how fuels, topography, climate, and fire weather influence fire severity. Less is known about how different forest management practices influence fire severity in multi-owner landscapes, despite costly and controversial suppression of wildfires that do not acknowledge ownership boundaries. In 2013, the Douglas Complex burned over 19,000 ha of Oregon & California Railroad (O&C) lands in Southwestern Oregon, USA. O&C lands are comprised of a checkerboard of private industrial and federal forestland...

Data from: Phylogenomic analyses reveal a deep history of hybridization and polyploidy in the Neotropical genus Lachemilla (Rosaceae)

Diego F. Morales-Briones, Aaron Liston & David C. Tank
Hybridization, incomplete lineage sorting, and phylogenetic error produce similar incongruence patterns, representing a great challenge for phylogenetic reconstruction. Here, we use sequence capture data and multiple species tree and species network approaches to resolve the backbone phylogeny of the Neotropical genus Lachemilla, while distinguishing among sources of incongruence. We used 396 nuclear loci and nearly complete plastome sequences from 27 species to clarify the relationships among the major groups of Lachemilla, and explored multiple sources...

Ocean acidification stress index for shellfish (OASIS): Linking Pacific oyster larval survival and exposure to variable carbonate chemistry regimes

Iria Gimenez Calvo, George Waldbusser & Burke Hales
Understanding larval bivalve responses to variable regimes of seawater carbonate chemistry requires realistic quantification of physiological stress. Based on a degree-day modeling approach, we developed a new metric, the ocean acidification stress index for shellfish (OASIS), for this purpose. OASIS integrates over the entire larval period the instantaneous stress associated with deviations from published sensitivity thresholds to aragonite saturation state (ΩAr) while experiencing variable carbonate chemistry. We measured survival to D-hinge and pre-settlement stage of...

Data from: Towards a predictive model of species interaction beta diversity

Catherine H. Graham, Benjamin G. Weinstein & Ben G. Weinstein
Species interactions are fundamental to community dynamics and ecosystem processes. Despite significant progress in describing species interactions, we lack the ability to predict changes in interactions across space and time. We outline a Bayesian approach to separate the probability of species co‐occurrence, interaction and detectability in influencing interaction betadiversity. We use a multi‐year hummingbird–plant time series, divided into training and testing data, to show that including models of detectability and occurrence improves forecasts of mutualistic...

Data from: Context-dependent costs and benefits of tuberculosis resistance traits in a wild mammalian host

Hannah F. Tavalire, Brianna R. Beechler, Peter E. Buss, Erin E. Gorsich, Eileen G. Hoal, Nikki Le Roex, Johannie M. Spaan, Robert S. Spaan, Paul D. Van Helden, Vanessa O. Ezenwa & Anna E. Jolles
Disease acts as a powerful driver of evolution in natural host populations, yet individuals in a population often vary in their susceptibility to infection. Energetic trade-offs between immune and reproductive investment lead to the evolution of distinct life-history strategies, driven by the relative fitness costs and benefits of resisting infection. However, examples quantifying the cost of resistance outside of the laboratory are rare. Here, we observe two distinct forms of resistance to bovine tuberculosis (bTB),...

Data from: Herbicides and herbivory interact to drive plant community and crop-tree establishment

Thomas D. Stokely, Jake Verschuyl, Joan C. Hagar & Matthew G. Betts
Land management practices often directly alter vegetation structure and composition, but the degree to which ecological processes such as herbivory interact with management to influence biodiversity is less well understood. We hypothesized that large herbivores compound the effects of intensive forest management on early-seral plant communities and plantation establishment (i.e., tree survival and growth), and the degree of such effects is dependent on the intensity of management practices. We established 225 m2 wild ungulate (deer...

Data from: The burning question: does fire affect habitat selection and forage preference of the black rhinoceros Diceros bicornis in East African savannahs?

T. Michael Anderson, Philbert M. Ngoti, Mawazo L. Nzunda, Daniel M. Griffith, James D.M. Speed, Frode Fossoy, Eivin Roskaft & Bente J. Graae
Endangered species conservation requires information on how management activities influence habitat quality. The black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornus) is critically endangered and restricted to savannas representing ~5% of its historical range. Fire is used extensively in savanna, but little is known about how rhinos respond to burning. Our aim was to understand rhino responses to fire by studying habitat selection and foraging at multiple scales. We used resource selection functions and GPS locations of 31 rhinos...

Data from: The influence of selection on MHC DQA and DQB haplotypes in the endemic New Zealand Hector’s and Māui dolphins

Dorothea Heimeier, Alana Alexander, Rebecca M. Hamner, Franz Pichler & C Scott Baker
Strong balancing selection on the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) can lead to different patterns in gene frequencies and neutral genomic variation within species. We investigated diversity and geographic structure of MHC genes DQA and DQB, as well as their inferred functional haplotypes, from two regional populations (East and West Coast) of the endangered Hector’s dolphin (Cephalorhynchus hectori hectori) and the critically endangered Māui dolphin (Cephalorhynchus hectori maui) (West Coast, North Island), and contrasted these results...

Data from: Influences of fire–vegetation feedbacks and post-fire recovery rates on forest landscape vulnerability to altered fire regimes

Alan J. Tepley, Enrique Thomann, Thomas T. Veblen, George L.W. Perry, Andrés Holz, Juan Paritsis, Thomas Kitzberger, Kristina J. Anderson-Teixeira & George L. W. Perry
1. In the context of on-going climatic warming, forest landscapes face increasing risk of conversion to non-forest vegetation through alteration of their fire regimes and their post-fire recovery dynamics. However, this pressure could be amplified or dampened, depending on how fire-driven changes to vegetation feed back to alter the extent or behavior of subsequent fires. 2. Here we develop a mathematical model to formalize understanding of how fire–vegetation feedbacks and the time to forest recovery...

Data from: Demography or selection on linked cultural traits or genes? Investigating the driver of low mtDNA diversity in the sperm whale using complementary mitochondrial and nuclear genome analyses

Phillip A. Morin, Andrew D. Foote, Charles Scott Baker, Brittany L. Hancock-Hanser, Kristin Kaschner, Bruce R. Mate, Sarah L. Mesnick, Victoria L. Pease, Patricia E. Rosel & Alana Alexander
Mitochondrial DNA has been heavily utilized in phylogeography studies for several decades. However, underlying patterns of demography and phylogeography may be misrepresented due to coalescence stochasticity, selection, variation in mutation rates, and cultural hitchhiking (linkage of genetic variation to culturally transmitted traits affecting fitness). Cultural hitchhiking has been suggested as an explanation for low genetic diversity in species with strong social structures, counteracting even high mobility, abundance and limited barriers to dispersal. One such species...

Data from: Old-growth forests buffer climate-sensitive bird populations from warming

Matthew G. Betts, Ben Phalan, Sarah J. K. Frey, Josée S. Rousseau & Zhiqiang Yang
Aim: Habitat loss and climate change constitute two of the greatest threats to biodiversity worldwide, and theory predicts that these factors may act synergistically to affect population trajectories. Recent evidence indicates that structurally complex old-growth forest can be cooler than other forest types during spring and summer months, thereby offering potential to buffer populations from negative effects of warming. Old growth may also have higher food and nest-site availability for certain species, which could have...

Data from: Fern and lycophyte diversity in the Pacific Northwest: patterns and predictors

Melanie A. Link-Perez & Shawn W. Laffan
Recent floristic efforts in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) have made it possible to characterize the broad-scale patterns of fern and lycophyte diversity across this geologically-complex region of western North America. The physiography of the PNW has been developing for over 200 million years, but Pleistocene glaciation-induced migrations and recolonizations have strongly influenced the assembly of the flora. With the high dispersal potential of spores, distribution patterns of pteridophytes may represent habitat suitability more than dispersal...

Data from: A trait-based framework for discerning drivers of species co-occurrence across heterogeneous landscapes

Brooks A. Kohli, Rebecca C. Terry & Rebecca J. Rowe
Null model analysis of species co-occurrence patterns has long been used to gain insight into community assembly but is often limited to identifying non-random patterns without providing clarity about underlying ecological mechanisms. This challenge is especially apparent when sampling units are spread across a heterogeneous landscape or along an environmental gradient because multiple mechanisms can produce similar co-occurrence patterns. We developed a trait-based approach for discriminating between environmental filtering and biotic interactions as the probable...

Data from: Geomagnetic field influences upward movement of young Chinook salmon emerging from nests

Nathan F. Putman, Michelle M. Scanlan, Amanda M. Pollock, Joseph P. O'Neil, Ryan B. Couture, Joseph S. Stoner, Thomas P. Quinn, Kenneth J. Lohmann, David L.G. Noakes & David L. G. Noakes
Organisms use a variety of environmental cues to orient their movements in three-dimensional space. Here, we show that the upward movement of young Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) emerging from gravel nests is influenced by the geomagnetic field. Fish in the ambient geomagnetic field travelled farther upwards through substrate than did fish tested in a field with the vertical component inverted. This suggests that the magnetic field is one of several factors that influences emergence from...

Data from: Identification of candidate effector genes of Pratylenchus penetrans

Paulo Vieira, Thomas Mayer, Sebastian Eves-Van Den Akker, Dana K. Howe, Inga Zasada, Thomas Baum, Jonathan D. Eisenback, Kathryn Kamo, Thomas R. Maier & Thomas J. Baum
Pratylenchus penetrans is one of the most important species among root lesion nematodes (RLNs) due to the detrimental and economic impact that it causes in a wide range of crops. Similar to other plant-parasitic nematodes (PPNs), P. penetrans harbors a significant number of secreted proteins that play key roles during parasitism. Here we combined spatially and temporally resolved next generation sequencing datasets of P. penetrans to select a list of candidate genes aimed at the...

Data from: Male harassment, female movements, and genetic diversity in a fragmented metapopulation

Paul M. Severns & Greg A. Breed
Interactions with males often alter the short‐term behaviors of reproductive females. Yet, the influence of different internal and external factors, such as sexual conflict, on animal movement and patch dynamics is not well understood. We studied associations between courtship, movements of reproductive females, and genetic diversity in a small, fragmented network of Euphydras editha taylori (Taylor's checkerspot butterfly). In the absence of courtship, female movements (step lengths) were restricted (< 2 m) and tortuous, and...

Data from: Energetic fitness: field metabolic rates assessed via 3D accelerometry complement conventional fitness metrics

David Gremillet, Amelie Lescroel, Grant Ballard, Katie M. Dugger, Melanie Massaro, Elizabeth L. Porzig & David G. Ainley
1) Evaluating the fitness of organisms is an essential step towards understanding their responses to environmental change. Connections between energy expenditure and fitness have been postulated for nearly a century. However, testing this premise among wild animals is constrained by difficulties in measuring energy expenditure while simultaneously monitoring conventional fitness metrics such as survival and reproductive output. 2) We addressed this issue by exploring the functional links between field metabolic rate (FMR), body condition, sex,...

Data from: Systematic revision of Symbiodiniaceae highlights the antiquity and diversity of coral endosymbionts

Todd C. LaJeunesse, John Everett Parkinson, Paul W. Gabrielson, Hae Jin Jeong, James Davis Reimer, Christian R. Voolstra & Scott R. Santos
The advent of molecular data has transformed the science of organizing and studying life on Earth. Genetics-based evidence provides fundamental insights into the diversity, ecology, and origins of many biological systems, including the mutualisms between metazoan hosts and their micro-algal partners. A well-known example is the dinoflagellate endosymbionts (“zooxanthellae”) that power the growth of stony corals and coral reef ecosystems. Once assumed to encompass a single panmictic species, genetic evidence has revealed a divergent and...

Data from: Why less complexity produces better forecasts: an independent data evaluation of kelp habitat models

Edward J. Gregr, Daniel M. Palacios, Allison Thompson, Kai M.A. Chan & Kai M. A. Chan
Understanding how species are distributed in the environment is increasingly important for natural resource management, particularly for keystone and habitat forming species, and those of conservation concern. Habitat suitability models are fundamental to developing this understanding; however their use in management continues to be limited due to often-vague model objectives and inadequate evaluation methods. Along the Northeast Pacific coast, canopy kelps (Macrocystis pyrifera and Nereocystis luetkeana) provide biogenic habitat and considerable primary production to nearshore...

Data from: Weed control with Bicyclopyrone + Bromoxynil in wheat

Carolina San Martín, Drew J. Lyon, Jennifer Gourlie, Henry C. Wetzel & Judit Barroso
Chemical weed control options in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cropping systems of the Pacific Northwest (PNW) are currently limited due to the presence of resistant weed biotypes. The efficacy of a new post-emergence herbicide in wheat, bicyclopyrone + bromoxynil (Talinor®), was evaluated for mayweed chamomile (Anthemis cotula L.) and prickly lettuce (Lactuca serriola L.) control in eastern Washington and Oregon in 2016 and 2017. Bicyclopyrone + bromoxynil provided superior control of mayweed chamomile in winter...

Data from: Phylogenetic patterns of trait and trait plasticity evolution: Insights from amphibian embryos

Rick Relyea, Patrick R. Stephens, Lisa N. Barrow, Andrew Blaustein, Paul Bradley, Julia Buck, Ann Chang, Brian I Crother, James Collins, Julia Earl, Stephanie S. Gervasi, Jason T. Hoverman, Olliver Hyman, Emily Claire Moriarty Lemmon, Thomas Luhring, Moses Michelsohn, Christopher M. Murray, Steven Price, Raymond Semlitsch, Andy Sih, Aaron Stoler, Nick VandenBroek, Alexa Warwick, Greta Wengert, John Hammond … & Aaron B. Stoler
Environmental variation favors the evolution of phenotypic plasticity. For many species, we understand the costs and benefits of different phenotypes, but we lack a broad understanding of how plastic traits evolve across large clades. Using identical experiments conducted across North America, we examined prey responses to predator cues. We quantified five life history traits and the magnitude of their plasticity for 23 amphibian species/populations (spanning three families and five genera) when exposed to no cues,...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    46

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    46

Affiliations

  • Oregon State University
    46
  • University of North Carolina
    3
  • University of Kansas
    2
  • University of Washington
    2
  • Utah State University
    2
  • University of Georgia
    2
  • Wake Forest University
    2
  • University of Kentucky
    2
  • Virginia Tech
    2
  • Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
    2