44 Works

Data from: What can aquatic gastropods tell us about phenotypic plasticity? A review and meta-analysis

Paul E. Bourdeau, Roger K. Butlin, Christer Brönmark, Timothy C. Edgell, Jason T. Hoverman & Johan Hollander
There have been few attempts to synthesise the growing body of literature on phenotypic plasticity to reveal patterns and generalities about the extent and magnitude of plastic responses. Here, we conduct a review and meta-analysis of published literature on phenotypic plasticity in aquatic (marine and freshwater) gastropods, a common system for studying plasticity. We identified 96 studies, using pre-determined search terms, published between 1985 and November 2013. The literature was dominated by studies of predator-induced...

Data from: The wake of hovering flight in bats

Jonas Håkansson, Anders Hedenström, York Winter & L. Christoffer Johansson
Hovering means stationary flight at zero net forward speed, which can be achieved by animals through muscle powered flapping flight. Small bats capable of hovering typically do so with a downstroke in an inclined stroke plane, and with an aerodynamically active outer wing during the upstroke. The magnitude and time history of aerodynamic forces should be reflected by vorticity shed into the wake. We thus expect hovering bats to generate a characteristic wake, but this...

Data from: Individual boldness is linked with protective shell shape in aquatic snails

Johan Ahlgren, Ben B. Chapman, P. Anders Nilsson, Christer Brönmark & C. Bronmark
The existence of consistent individual differences in behaviour (‘animal personality’) has been well documented in recent years. However, how such individual variation in behaviour is maintained over evolutionary time is an ongoing conundrum. A well-studied axis of animal personality is individual variation along a bold–shy continuum, where individuals differ consistently in their propensity to take risks. A predation-risk cost to boldness is often assumed, but also that the reproductive benefits associated with boldness lead to...

Data from: Mutation screening of 1,237 cancer genes across six model cell lines of basal-like breast cancer

Eleonor Olsson, Christof Winter, Anthony George, Yilun Chen, Therese Törngren, Pär-Ola Bendahl, Åke Borg, Sofia K. Gruvberger-Saal & Lao H. Saal
Basal-like breast cancer is an aggressive subtype generally characterized as poor prognosis and lacking the expression of the three most important clinical biomarkers, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2. Cell lines serve as useful model systems to study cancer biology in vitro and in vivo. We performed mutational profiling of six basal-like breast cancer cell lines (HCC38, HCC1143, HCC1187, HCC1395, HCC1954, and HCC1937) and their matched normal lymphocyte DNA using targeted capture and next-generation sequencing...

Data from: Do arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi stabilize litter-derived carbon in soil?

Erik Verbruggen, Jan Jansa, Edith C. Hammer & Matthias C. Rillig
1. Fine roots and mycorrhiza often represent the largest input of carbon (C) into soils, and are therefore of primary relevance to the soil C balance. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi have previously been found to increase litter decomposition which may lead to reduced soil C stocks, but these studies have focused on immediate decomposition of relatively high amounts of high-quality litter and may therefore not hold in many ecological settings over longer terms. 2. Here...

Data from: Disentangling plant and soil microbial controls on carbon and nitrogen loss in grassland mesocosms

Franciska T. De Vries, Helene Bracht Jorgensen, Katarina Hedlund & Richard D. Bardgett
1. It is well known that plant–soil interactions play an important role in determining the impact of global change phenomena on biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Little is known, however, about the individual and relative importance for carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling of non-random changes in plant and soil communities that result from global change phenomena, such as fertilization and agricultural intensification. 2. We set up a field-based mesocosm experiment in which we re-inoculated soil...

Data from: Serial monitoring of circulating tumor DNA in patients with primary breast cancer for detection of occult metastatic disease

Eleonor Olsson, Christof Winter, Anthony George, Yilun Chen, Jillian Howlin, Man‐Hung Eric Tang, Malin Dahlgren, Ralph Schulz, Dorthe Grabau, Danielle Van Westen, Mårten Fernö, Christian Ingvar, Carsten Rose, Pär‐Ola Bendahl, Lisa Rydén, Åke Borg, Sofia K. Gruvberger-Saal, Helena Jernström & Lao H. Saal
Metastatic breast cancer is usually diagnosed after becoming symptomatic, at which point it is rarely curable. Cell‐free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) contains tumor‐specific chromosomal rearrangements that may be interrogated in blood plasma. We evaluated serial monitoring of ctDNA for earlier detection of metastasis in a retrospective study of 20 patients diagnosed with primary breast cancer and long follow‐up. Using an approach combining low‐coverage whole‐genome sequencing of primary tumors and quantification of tumor‐specific rearrangements in plasma...

Data from: Selective spore germination on shoots of Homalothecium lutescens, a moss with dwarf males

Frida Rosengren & Nils Cronberg
Spores from three bryophyte species with dwarf males (Homalothecium lutescens, Homalothecium sericeum and Isothecium alopecuroides) were sown on shoots of H. lutescens in vitro. After 10 months, presence and fertility of dwarf plants were scored. Spores of the more distantly related I. alopecuroides were unable to develop into dwarf plants on H. lutescens. Spores of both H. lutescens and H. sericeum developed into dwarf plants. In fact, dwarf plants of H. sericeum were both more...

Data from: Fixational eye movements predict visual sensitivity

Chris Scholes, Paul V. McGraw, Marcus Nyström & Neil W. Roach
During steady fixation, observers make small fixational saccades at a rate of around 1-2 per second. Presentation of a visual stimulus triggers a biphasic modulation in fixational saccade rate – an initial inhibition followed by a period of elevated rate and a subsequent return to baseline. Here we show that, during passive viewing, this rate signature is highly sensitive to small changes in stimulus contrast. By training a linear support vector machine to classify trials...

Data from: Axl-regulating tumor suppressor miR-34a increased in ccRCC but not correlating with Axl mRNA or Axl protein levels

Helena K. M. Fritz, Anna Gustafsson, Börje Ljungberg, Yvonne Ceder, Håkan Axelson, Björn Dahlbäck & Helena K. Fritz
Background: High expression of the receptor tyrosine kinase Axl is associated with poor prognosis in patients with Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC), the most common malignancy of the kidney. The miR-34a has been shown to directly regulate Axl in cancer cells. The miR-34a is a mediator of p53-dependent tumor suppression, and low expression of miR-34a has been associated with worse prognosis in several cancers. Our aim was to elucidate whether miR-34a or the other members of...

Data from: Poor housing conditions in association with child health in a disadvantaged immigrant population: a cross-sectional study in Rosengård, Malmö, Sweden

Anna Oudin, Jens C. Richter, Tahir Taj, Kristina Jakobsson & Lina Al-Nahar
Objectives: To describe the home environment in terms of housing conditions and their association with child health in a disadvantaged immigrant population. Design: A cross-sectional observational study. Setting: Enrolment took place during 2010–2011 in Rosengård, Malmö, Sweden. Participants: Children aged 0–13 years in 2 study neighbourhoods were recruited from local health records and from schools. 359 children participated, with a participation rate of 40%. Data on health, lifestyle and apartment characteristics from questionnaire-led interviews with...

Data from: Escaping peril: perceived predation risk affects migratory propensity

Kaj Hulthén, Ben B. Chapman, P. Anders Nilsson, Jerker Vinterstare, Lars-Anders Hansson, Christian Skov, Jakob Brodersen, Henrik Baktoft & Christer Brönmark
Although migratory plasticity is increasingly documented, the ecological drivers of plasticity are not well understood. Predation risk can influence migratory dynamics, but whether seasonal migrants can adjust their migratory behaviour according to perceived risk is unknown. We used electronic tags to record the migration of individual roach (Rutilus rutilus), a partially migratory fish, in the wild following exposure to manipulation of direct (predator presence/absence) and indirect (high/low roach density) perceived predation risk in experimental mesocosms....

Data from: Genetic differentiation and admixture between sibling allopolyploids in the Dactylorhiza majalis complex

Ovidiu Paun, Francisco Balao, Maria Tannhäuser, Maria Teresa Lorenzo & Mikael Hedrén
Allopolyploidization often happens recurrently, but the evolutionary significance of its iterative nature is not yet fully understood. Of particular interest are the gene flow dynamics and the mechanisms that allow young sibling polyploids to remain distinct while sharing the same ploidy, heritage and overlapping distribution areas. By using eight highly variable nuclear microsatellites, newly reported here, we investigate the patterns of divergence and gene flow between 386 polyploid and 42 diploid individuals, representing the sibling...

Data from: Ecological explanations to island gigantism: dietary niche divergence, predation and size in an endemic lizard

Anna Runemark, Kostas Sagonas & Erik I. Svensson
Although rapid evolution of body size on islands has long been known, the ecological mechanisms behind this island phenomenon remain poorly understood. Diet is an important selective pressure for morphological divergence. Here we investigate if selection for novel diets has contributed to the multiple independent cases of island gigantism in the Skyros wall lizard (Podarcis gaigeae) and if diet, predation, or both factors best explain island gigantism. We combined data on body size, shape, bite...

Data from: Priority effects in a planktonic bloom-forming marine diatom

Josefin Sefbom, Ingrid Sassenhagen, Karin Rengefors & Anna Godhe
Priority effects occur when a species or genotype with earlier arrival has an advantage such that its relative abundance in the community or population is increased compared with later-arriving species. Few studies have dealt with this concept in the context of within-species competition. Skeletonema marinoi is a marine diatom that shows a high degree of genetic differentiation between populations over small geographical distances. To test whether historical events such as priority effects may have been...

Data from: Adaptive strategies in nocturnally migrating insects and songbirds: contrasting responses to wind

Jason W. Chapman, Cecilia Nilsson, Ka S. Lim, Johan Bäckman, Donald R. Reynolds, Thomas Alerstam & Don R. Reynolds
1. Animals that use flight as their mode of transportation must cope with the fact that their migration and orientation performance is strongly affected by the flow of the medium they are moving in, i.e. by the winds. Different strategies can be used to mitigate the negative effects and benefit from the positive effects of a moving flow. The strategies an animal can use will be constrained by the relationship between the speed of the...

Data from: Chronic Trichuris muris Infection Decreases Diversity of the Intestinal Microbiota and Concomitantly Increases the Abundance of Lactobacilli

Jacob Bak Holm, Daniel Sorobetea, Pia Kiilerich, Yuliaxis Ramayo-Caldas, Jordi Estellé, Tao Ma, Lise Madsen, Karsten Kristiansen & Marcus Svensson-Frej
The intestinal microbiota is vital for shaping the local intestinal environment as well as host immunity and metabolism. At the same time, epidemiological and experimental evidence suggest an important role for parasitic worm infections in maintaining the inflammatory and regulatory balance of the immune system. In line with this, the prevalence of persistent worm infections is inversely correlated with the incidence of immune-associated diseases, prompting the use of controlled parasite infections for therapeutic purposes. Despite...

Data from: Simultaneous fMRI and EEG during the multi-source interference task

John A. Robertson, Alex W. Thomas, Frank S. Prato, Mikael Johansson & Henrietta Nittby
Background: fMRI and EEG are two non-invasive functional imaging techniques within cognitive neuroscience that have complementary advantages to obtain both temporal and spatial information. The multi-source interference task (MSIT) has been shown to generate robust activations of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) on both a single-subject level and in group averages, in fMRI studies. We have now simultaneously acquired fMRI and EEG during a cognitive interference task. Materials and Methods: Healthy volunteers were tested...

Data from: Range expansion and retraction along a moving contact zone has no effect on the genetic diversity of two passerine birds

Jan O. Engler, Jean Secondi, Deborah A. Dawson, Ortwin Elle & Axel Hochkirch
Disentangling the factors shaping species distributions remains a central goal in biogeography, ecology and evolutionary biology. The extrinsic pressures that may facilitate range shifts, such as climatic factors or biotic interactions are well known. However, in contrast, the possible intrinsic factors are manifold and hard to generalize across taxa. Recently, several theoretical studies have investigated the consequences of moving range borders on genetic diversity. However, empirical studies that support or refute these theoretical predictions are...

Data from: Convergent losses of decay mechanisms and rapid turnover of symbiosis genes in mycorrhizal mutualists

Annegret Kohler, Alan Kuo, Laszlo G. Nagy, Emmanuelle Morin, Kerrie W. Barry, Francois Buscot, Bjorn Canback, Cindy Choi, Nicolas Cichocki, Alicia Clum, Jan Colpaert, Alex Copeland, Mauricio D. Costa, Jeanne Dore, Dimitrios Floudas, Gilles Gay, Mariangela Girlanda, Bernard Henrissat, Sylvie Herrmann, Jaqueline Hess, Nils Hogberg, Tomas Johansson, Hassine-Radhouane Khouja, Kurt LaButti, Urs Lahrmann … & Francis Martin
To elucidate the genetic bases of mycorrhizal lifestyle evolution, we sequenced new fungal genomes, including 13 ectomycorrhizal (ECM), orchid (ORM) and ericoid (ERM) species, and five saprotrophs, which we analyzed along with other fungal genomes. Ectomycorrhizal fungi have a reduced complement of genes encoding plant cell wall–degrading enzymes (PCWDEs), as compared to their ancestral wood decayers. Nevertheless, they have retained a unique array of PCWDEs, thus suggesting that they possess diverse abilities to decompose lignocellulose....

Data from: Visual modelling suggests a weak relationship between the evolution of ultraviolet vision and plumage colouration in birds

Olle Lind & Kaspar Delhey
Birds have sophisticated colour vision mediated by four cones types that cover a wide visual spectrum including ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths. Many birds have modest UV-sensitivity provided by violet-sensitive (VS) cones with sensitivity maxima between 400-425 nm. However, some birds have evolved higher UV-sensitivity and a larger visual spectrum given by UV-sensitive (UVS) cones maximally sensitive at 360-370 nm. The reasons for VS-UVS transitions and their relationship to visual ecology remain unclear. It has been hypothesized...

Data from: Evolution of novel wood decay mechanisms in Agaricales revealed by the genome sequences of Fistulina hepatica and Cylindrobasidium torrendii

Dimitrios Floudas, Benjamin W. Held, Robert Riley, Laszlo G. Nagy, Gage Koehler, Anthony S. Ransdell, Hina Younus, Julianna Chow, Jennifer Chiniquy, Anna Lipzen, Andrew Tritt, Hui Sun, Sajeet Haridas, Kurt LaButti, Robin A. Ohm, Ursula Kues, Robert A. Blanchette, Igor V. Grigoriev, Robert E. Minto & David S. Hibbett
Wood decay mechanisms in Agaricomycotina have been traditionally separated in two categories termed white and brown rot. Recently the accuracy of such a dichotomy has been questioned. Here, we present the genome sequences of the white rot fungus Cylindrobasidium torrendii and the brown rot fungus Fistulina hepatica both members of Agaricales, combining comparative genomics and wood decay experiments. Cylindrobasidium torrendii is closely related to the white-rot root pathogen Armillaria mellea, while F. hepatica is related...

Data from: Local and landscape-level floral resources explain effects of wildflower strips on wild bees across four European countries

Jeroen Scheper, Riccardo Bommarco, Andrea Holzschuh, Simon G. Potts, Verena Riedinger, Stuart P. M. Roberts, , Henrik G. Smith, Ingolf Steffan-Dewenter, Jennifer B. Wickens, Victoria J. Wickens & David Kleijn
1. Growing evidence for declines in wild bees calls for the development and implementation of effective mitigation measures. Enhancing floral resources is a widely accepted measure for promoting bees in agricultural landscapes, but effectiveness varies considerably between landscapes and regions. We hypothesize that this variation is mainly driven by a combination of the direct effects of measures on local floral resources and the availability of floral resources in the surrounding landscape. 2. To test this,...

Data from: The measurement of selection when detection is imperfect: how good are naïve methods?

John Waller & Erik I. Svensson
The life spans of animals can be measured in natural populations by uniquely marking individuals and then releasing them into the field. Selection on survival (a component of fitness) can subsequently be quantified by regressing the life spans of these marked individuals on their trait values. However, marked individuals are not always seen on every subsequent catching occasion, and for this reason, imperfect detection is considered a problem when estimating survival selection in natural populations....

Data from: Above-ground and below-ground responses to long-term nutrient addition across a retrogressive chronosequence

David A. Wardle, Micael Jonsson, Jordan R. Mayor & Daniel B. Metcalfe
1. There is much interest in understanding ecosystem responses to local-scale soil fertility variation, which has often been studied using retrogressive chronosequences that span thousands of years and show declining fertility and plant productivity over time. There have been few attempts to experimentally test how plant nutrient limitation changes during retrogression. 2. We studied a well-characterized system of 30 forested lake islands in northern Sweden that collectively represent a 5350-year post-fire retrogressive chronosequence, with fertility...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    44

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    44

Affiliations

  • Lund University
    44
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    6
  • University of Nottingham
    3
  • Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology
    2
  • University of Tasmania
    2
  • University of Gothenburg
    2
  • University of Oslo
    2
  • Purdue University
    2
  • Clark University
    2
  • Technical University of Denmark
    2