65 Works

Matching habitat choice in Azure sand grasshoppers

Carlos Camacho, Alberto Sanabria-Fernández, Adrián Baños-Villalba & Pim Edelaar
This data set includes measurements of substrate use by ground-perching grasshoppers (Sphingonotus azurescens) in relation to body colour before and after experimental manipulation of their original colour. The data were collected between May and September 2017 in an urban mosaic of dark and pale pavements located in an abandoned housing development area near Dos Hermanas (Seville, Spain; 37.306° N, 5.932° E). The analysis presented in this article is based on 80 adult females and 138...

Data from: Wintering bird communities are tracking climate change faster than breeding communities

Aleksi Lehikoinen, Åke Lindström, Andrea Santangeli, Päivi Sirkiä, Lluis Brotons, Vincent Devictor, Jaanus Elts, Ruud P. B. Fobben, Henning Heldbjerg, Sergi Herrando, Marc Herremans, Marie-Anne R. Hudson, Frederic Jiguet, Alison Johnston, Romain Lorrilliere, Emma-Liina Marjakangas, Nicole L. Michel, Charlotte M. Moshøj, Renno Nellis, Jean-Yves Paquet, Adam C. Smith, Tibor Szep & Chris Van Turnhout
1. Global climate change is driving species’ distributions towards the poles and mountain tops during both non-breeding and breeding seasons, leading to changes in the composition of natural communities. However, the degree of season differences in climate-driven community shifts has not been thoroughly investigated at large spatial scales. 2. We compared the rates of change in the community composition during both winter (non-breeding season) and summer (breeding) and their relation to temperature changes. 3. Based...

Data from: Variation in predation regime drives sex-specific differences in mosquitofish foraging behaviour

Varpu Pärssinen, Kaj Hulthén, Christer Brönmark, Gustaf Ekelund Ugge, Raphael Gollnisch, Simon David Herzog, Nan Hu, Marcus Lee, Yongcui Sha, Martin Škerlep, Jerker Vinterstare, R. Brian Langerhans, P. Anders Nilsson, Caroline Björnerås, Lars-Anders Hansson, Emma Johansson, Karin Rengefors & Huan Zhang
Predation is a well-studied driver of ecological selection on prey traits, which frequently drives divergence in anti-predator performance across environments that vary in predation risk. However, predation also alters prey mortality regimes, where low predation risk often results in higher prey densities and consequently higher intensities of intraspecific resource competition. In addition, predation risk alters the foraging context, as acquiring food can be risky in the presence of predators. Thus, different predation regimes can drive...

Latitudinal clines in sexual selection, sexual size dimorphism, and sex-specific genetic dispersal during a poleward range expansion

Rachael Dudaniec, Alexander Carey, Erik Svensson, Bengt Hansson, Chuan Ji Yong & Lesley Lancaster
Range expansions can be shaped by sex differences in behaviours and other phenotypic traits affecting dispersal and reproduction. Here, we investigate sex differences in morphology, behaviour and genomic population differentiation along a climate-mediated range expansion in the common bluetail damselfly Ischnura elegans in northern Europe. We sampled 65 sites along a 583 km gradient spanning the I. elegans range in Sweden and quantified latitudinal gradients in site relative abundance, sex ratio and sex-specific shifts in...

Scavenging beetles control the temporal response of soil communities to carrion decomposition

Tancredi Caruso, Marco Ilardi, Sheena Cotter, Edith Hammer & Gillian Riddell
1. Carrion is a frequent but overlooked source of nutrients to the soil. The decomposition of carrion is accelerated by invertebrate scavengers but the impact of the scavengers on below-ground biota and its functions is scarcely known. 2. We conducted a laboratory experiment to investigate the effects of the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides on the soil community of a temperate broadleaved forest. We assembled microcosms from soil collected from an oak woodland and treated them...

Data for: Anti-predator phenotype in crucian carp altered by a psychoactive drug

Jerker Vinterstare
Predator-inducible defences constitute a widespread form of adaptive phenotypic plasticity, and such defences have recently been suggested linked with the neuroendocrine system. The neuroendocrine system is a target of endocrine disruptors, such as psychoactive pharmaceuticals, which are common aquatic contaminants. We hypothesized that exposure to an antidepressant pollutant, fluoxetine, influences the physiological stress response in our model species, crucian carp, affecting its behavioural and morphological responses to predation threat. We examined short- and long-term effects...

Wild bees and hoverflies respond differently to urbanisation, human population density and urban form

Anna Persson, Johan Ekroos, Peter Olsson & Henrik Smith
While urbanisation contributes to global biodiversity declines, flower-rich urban habitats may provide beneficial pollinator habitats. We investigated the potential of urban residential areas to contribute to pollinator diversity by analysing wild bee and hoverfly species richness and composition of species assemblages of summer-active species, sampled in 53 gardens across urban and rural landscapes of Malmö, the regional capital of Sweden’s southernmost county. Species richness differed between urban and rural gardens, and between four urban residential...

Raw data for: Rhinarium cooling and sensitivity to thermal radiation in domestic dogs

Ronald Kröger, Chelsey Luce & Dennis Kröger
The rhinarium of a dog seems to be cold for sensitivity to weak thermal radiation, such as body heat radiation. However, according to De Cock Buning [1], the temperature of the sensor should not matter for the detection of radiating heat. We investigated the relevance of detector temperature for the amount of transferred thermal energy and the contrast in the thermal image by computer modelling, which showed that the detector has to be colder than...

Fitness cost from fluctuating ultraviolet radiation in Daphnia magna

Franca Stábile, Christer Brőnmark, Lars-Anders Hansson & Marcus Lee
Solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is an important environmental threat for organisms in aquatic systems, but its temporally variable nature makes the understanding of its effects ambiguous. The aim of our study was to assess potential fitness costs associated with fluctuating UVR in the aquatic zooplankter Daphnia magna. We investigated individual survival, reproduction and behaviour when exposed to different UVR treatments. Individuals exposed to fluctuating UVR, resembling natural variations in cloud cover, had the lowest fitness...

Habitat geometry in artificial microstructure affects bacterial and fungal growth, interactions, and substrate degradation 2nd part

Carlos Arellano-Caicedo
Microhabitat conditions determine the magnitude and speed of microbial processes but have been challenging to investigate. In this study we used microfluidic devices to determine the effect of the spatial distortion of a pore space on fungal and bacterial growth, interactions, and substrate degradation. The devices contained channels differing in bending angles and order. Sharper angles reduced fungal and bacterial biomass, especially when angles were repeated in the same direction. Substrate degradation was only decreased...

The integrin-mediated adhesive complex in the ancestor of animals, fungi, and amoebae

Matthew Brown, Seungho Kang, Alexander K. Tice, Courtney W. Stairs, Robert E. Jones, Daniel J.G. Lahr & Matthew W. Brown
Integrins are transmembrane receptors that activate signal transduction pathways upon extracellular matrix binding. The integrin-mediated adhesive complex (IMAC) mediates various cell physiological processes. Although the IMAC was thought to be specific to animals, in the past ten years these complexes were discovered in other lineages of Obazoa, the group containing animals, fungi, and several microbial eukaryotes. Very recently, many genomes and transcriptomes from Amoebozoa (the eukaryotic supergroup sister to Obazoa), other obazoans, and orphan protist...

Trust in researchers and researchers’ statements in large carnivore conservation

Kristin Mathiesen, Magnus Barmoen, Kim Magnus Bærum & Maria Johansson
Human-wildlife interactions occur when humans and wildlife overlap in the same landscapes. Due to the growing human population, the number of interactions will continue to increase, and in some cases, develop further into social conflicts. Conflicts may occur between people disagreeing about wildlife conservation or arguing over which wildlife management measures should be taken. Social conflicts between humans are based on different attitudes, values and land-use aspirations. The success of solving these social conflicts strongly...

Hovering flight in hummingbird hawkmoths: Kinematics, wake dynamics and aerodynamic power

Kajsa Warfvinge, Christoffer Johansson & Anders Hedenström
Hovering insects are divided into two categories: ‘normal’ hoverers that move the wing symmetrically in a horizontal stroke plane, and those with an inclined stroke plane. Normal hoverers have been suggested to support their weight during both downstroke and upstroke, shedding vortex rings each half-stroke. Insects with an inclined stroke plane should, according to theory, produce flight forces only during downstroke, and only generate one set of vortices. The type of hovering is thus linked...

Data from: An international, multi-stakeholder survey about metadata awareness, knowledge, and use in scholarly communications

Laura Paglione, Kathryn Kaiser, Michelle Urberg, Maria Johnsson, Jennifer Kemp & Alice Meadows
The Metadata 2020 initiative is an ongoing effort to bring various scholarly communications stakeholder groups together to promote principles and standards of practice to improve the quality of metadata. To understand the perspectives and practices of the main stakeholder groups (librarians, publishers, researchers and repository managers) regarding metadata, the Metadata 2020 Researcher Communications Project Group conducted a survey in the summer of 2019. The survey content was generated by representatives from the stakeholder groups who...

Selection data: Reproductive success and morphology

Melissa Liotta, Jessica Abbott, Molly Morris & Oscar Rios-Cardenas
Alternative reproductive tactics (ARTs) have provided valuable insights into how sexual selection and life history tradeoffs can lead to variation within a sex. However, the possibility that tactics may constrain evolution through intralocus tactical conflict is rarely considered. In addition, when intralocus conflict has been considered, the focus has often been on the genetic correlations between the ARTs, while evidence that the ARTs have different optima for associated traits and that at least one of...

Cross-reactivity of antibody responses to Borrelia afzelii OspC

Lars Råberg, Mehrnaz Nouri, Neus Latorre Margalef & Agnieszka Czopek
The tick-transmitted bacterium Borrelia afzelii consists of a number of antigenically different strains ¾ often defined by outer surface protein C (OspC) genotype ¾ that coexist at stable frequencies in host populations. To investigate how host antibody responses affect strain coexistence, we measured antibody cross-reactivity to three different OspC types (OspC 2, 3 and 9) in three different strains of laboratory mice (BALB/c, C3H and C57BL/6). The extent of cross-reactivity differed between mouse strains, being...

Detecting purging of inbreeding depression by a slow rate of inbreeding for various traits: the impact of environmental and experimental conditions

Mads Fristrup Schou, Jørgen Bundgaard, Volker Loeschcke &
Inbreeding depression (ID) has since long been recognized as a significant factor in evolutionary biology. It is mainly the consequence of (partially) recessive deleterious mutations maintained by mutation-selection balance in large random mating populations. When population size is reduced, recessive alleles are increasingly found in homozygous condition due to drift and inbreeding and become more prone to selection. Particularly at slow rates of drift and inbreeding, selection will be more effective in purging such alleles,...

Data from: Extreme altitudes during diurnal flights in a nocturnal songbird migrant

Sissel Sjöberg, Gintaras Malmiga, Andreas Nord, Arne Andersson, Johan Bäckman, Maja Tarka, Mikkel Willemoes, Kasper Thorup, Bengt Hansson, Thomas Alerstam & Dennis Hasselquist
Billions of nocturnally migrating songbirds fly across oceans and deserts on their annual journeys. Using multisensor dataloggers, we show that great reed warblers (Acrocephalus arundinaceus) regularly prolong their otherwise strictly nocturnal flights into daytime when crossing the Mediterranean Sea and the Sahara Desert. Intriguingly, when prolonging their flights, they climbed steeply at dawn, from mean 2,394 m asl to reach extreme cruising altitudes (mean 5,367 m asl, max 6,267 m asl) during daytime flights. This...

Evolutionary tradeoffs between male secondary sexual traits revealed by a phylogeny of the hyperdiverse tribe Eumaeini (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae)

Wendy A. Valencia-Montoya, Tiago B. Quental, João Filipe R. Tonini, Gerard Talavera, James D. Crall, Gerardo Lamas, Robert C. Busby, Ana Paula S. Carvalho, Ana B. Morais, Nicolás Oliveira Mega, Helena Piccoli Romanowski, Marjorie A. Liénard, Shayla Salzman, Melissa R. L. Whitaker, Akito Y. Kawahara, David J. Lohman, Robert K. Robbins & Naomi E. Pierce
Male butterflies in the hyperdiverse tribe Eumaeini possess an unusually complex and diverse repertoire of secondary sexual characteristics involved in pheromone production and dissemination. Maintaining multiple sexually selected traits is likely to be metabolically costly, potentially resulting in trade-offs in the evolution of male signals. However, a phylogenetic framework to test hypotheses regarding the evolution and maintenance of male sexual traits in Eumaeini has been lacking. Here, we infer a comprehensive, time-calibrated phylogeny from 379...

Data from: Male and female reproductive fitness costs of an immune response in natural populations

Stephen De Lisle & Daniel Bolnick
Parasites can mediate host fitness both directly, via effects on survival and reproduction, or indirectly by inducing host immune defense with costly side-effects. The evolution of immune defense is determined by a complex interplay of costs and benefits of parasite infection and immune response, all of which may differ for male and female hosts in sexual lineages. Here, we examine fitness costs associated with an inducible immune defense in a fish-cestode host-parasite system. Cestode infection...

Data for: Flying through gaps – How does a bird deal with the problem and what costs are there?

Per Henningsson
Animals flying in the wild often show remarkable abilities to negotiate obstacles and narrow openings in complex environments. Impressive as these abilities are, this must result in costs in terms of impaired flight performance. In this study, I used a budgerigar as model for studying these costs. The bird was filmed in stereo when flying through a wide range of gap widths from well above wingspan down to a mere 1/4 of wingspan. 3D flight...

Daphnia magna trade-off safety from UV radiation for food

Marcus Lee & Lars-Anders Hansson
Research on diel vertical migration (DVM) is generally conducted at the population level, whereas few studies have focused on how individual animals behaviorally respond to threats when also having access to foraging opportunities. We utilized a 3-D tracking platform to record the swimming behavior of Daphnia magna exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) in the presence or absence of a food patch. We analyzed the vertical position of individuals before and during UVR exposure and found...

Data from: Reindeer control over subarctic treeline alters soil fungal communities with potential consequences for soil carbon storage

Henni Ylänne, Rieke L. Madsen, Carles Castaño, Daniel B. Metcalfe & Karina E. Clemmensen
Here we present the data and R script from “Reindeer control over subarctic treeline alters soil fungal communities with potential consequences for soil carbon storage” by Henni Ylänne, Rieke L. Madsen, Carles Castaño, Daniel B. Metcalfe and Karina E. Clemmensen (Global Change Biology, 2021). In this study we reported the impacts of grazing regime and mountain birch vicinity on the abundance, diversity and community composition of the soil fungal community, and explored how the soil...

Towards a stable global Noctuidae (Lepidoptera) taxonomy

Kevin Keegan, Jadranka Rota, Reza Zahiri, Alberto Zilli, Niklas Wahlberg, B. Christian Schmidt, J. Donald Lafontaine, Paul Goldstein & David Wagner
The family Noctuidae is one of the world’s most diverse, ecologically successful, and economically important animal lineages; with over 12,000 species in ~1150 genera. We inferred a phylogeny based on eight protein-coding genes (>6,400 base pairs) for the global fauna, greatly expanding upon previous attempts to stabilize the higher classification of Noctuidae by sampling 70 of the 76 widely recognized family-group taxa: 20 of the 21 subfamilies, 32 of the 35 tribes, and 18 of...

Data from: Climate shapes the geographic distribution and introgressive spread of colour ornamentation in common wall lizards

Maravillas Ruiz Minano, Geoffrey While, Weizhao Yang, Christopher Burridge, Roberto Sacchi, Marco Zuffi, Stefano Scali, Daniele Salvi & Tobias Uller
Climate can exert an effect on the strength of sexual selection, but empirical evidence is limited. Here, we tested if climate predicts the geographic distribution and introgressive spread of sexually selected male colour ornamentation across 114 populations of the common wall lizard, Podarcis muralis. Colouration was highly structured across the landscape, and did not reflect genetic differentiation. Instead, colour ornamentation was consistently exaggerated in hot and dry environments, suggesting that climate-driven selection maintains geographic variation...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    65

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    64
  • Journal Article
    1

Affiliations

  • Lund University
    65
  • University of Cambridge
    3
  • Uppsala University
    3
  • North Carolina State University
    3
  • Aarhus University
    2
  • University of Oslo
    2
  • University of Connecticut
    2
  • Natural Resources Institute Finland
    2
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    2
  • University of Tartu
    2