3 Works

Supplementary datasets, data analysis code, and R tutorials for: Phylogenetic analysis of adaptation in comparative physiology and biomechanics: overview and a case study of thermal physiology in treefrogs

Daniel Moen, Elisa Cabrera-Guzmán, Itzue Caviedes-Solis, Edna González-Bernal & Allison Hanna
Comparative phylogenetic studies of adaptation are uncommon in biomechanics and physiology. Such studies require collecting data from many species, a challenge when data collection is experimentally intensive. Moreover, researchers struggle to employ the most biologically appropriate phylogenetic tools for identifying adaptive evolution. Here, we detail an established but greatly underutilized phylogenetic comparative framework—the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process—that explicitly models long-term adaptation. We discuss challenges in implementing and interpreting the model, and we outline potential solutions. We demonstrate...

Group composition of individual personalities alters social network structure in experimental populations of forked fungus beetles

Phoebe Cook, Olivia Baker, Robin Costello, Vincent Formica & Edmund Brodie
Social network structure is a critical group character that mediates the flow of information, pathogens, and resources among individuals in a population, yet little is known about what shapes social structures. In this study, we experimentally tested whether social network structure depends on the personalities of group members. Replicate groups of forked fungus beetles (Bolitotherus cornutus) were engineered to include only members previously assessed as either more social or less social. We found that individuals...

A global ecological signal of extinction risk in terrestrial vertebrates

Maya Munstermann, Noel Heim, Douglas McCauley, Jonathan Payne, Nathan Upham, Steve Wang & Matthew Knope
To determine the distribution and causes of extinction threat across functional groups of terrestrial vertebrates, we assembled a dataset on ecological traits for 18,016 species and tested, using phylogenetic comparative methods, which categories of habitat association, mode of locomotion, and feeding mode best predict extinction risk. We found that cave-dwelling amphibians, brachiating mammals (all of which are primates), aerial and scavenging birds, and pedal squamates are all disproportionately threatened with extinction. Across four vertebrate classes,...

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