14 Works

Data from: Genetic consequences of breaking migratory traditions in barnacle geese Branta leucopsis

Rudy M. Jonker, Robert H. S. Kraus, Qiong Zhang, Pim Van Hooft, Kjell Larsson, Henk P. Van Der Jeugd, Ralf H. J. M. Kurvers, Sip E. Van Wieren, Maarten J. J. M. Loonen, Richard P. M. A. Crooijmans, Ronald C. Ydenberg, Martien A. M. Groenen, Herbert H. T. Prins & M. J. J. E. Loonen
Cultural transmission of migratory traditions enables species to deal with their environment based on experiences from earlier generations. Also, it allows a more adequate and rapid response to rapidly changing environments. When individuals break with their migratory traditions, new population structures can emerge that may affect gene flow. Recently, the migratory traditions of the Barnacle Goose Branta leucopsis changed, and new populations differing in migratory distance emerged. Here, we investigate the population genetic structure of...

Data from: A novel integrative method for measuring body condition in ecological studies based on physiological dysregulation

Emmanuel Milot, Alan A. Cohen, François Vézina, Deborah M. Buehler, Kevin D. Matson, Theunis Piersman & Theunis Piersma
1. The body condition of free-ranging animals affects their response to stress, decisions, ability to fulfil vital needs and, ultimately, fitness. However, this key attribute in ecology remains difficult to assess, and there is a clear need for more integrative measures than the common univariate proxies. 2. We propose a systems biology approach that positions individuals along a gradient from a ‘normal/optimal’ to ‘abnormal/suboptimal’ physiological state based on Mahalanobis distance computed from physiological biomarkers. We...

Data from: Frugivores and cheap fruits make fruiting fruitful

Francisco Encinas-Viso, Tomas A. Revilla, Ellen Van Velzen & Rampal S. Etienne
Animal seed dispersal provides an important ecosystem service by strongly benefiting plant communities. There are several theoretical studies on the ecology of plant-animal seed-disperser interactions, but few studies have explored the evolution of this mutualism. Moreover, these studies ignore plant life-history and frugivore foraging behavior. Thus, it remains an open question what the conditions for the diversification of fruit traits are, in spite of the multitude of empirical studies on fruit trait diversity. Here we...

Data from: When and where does mortality occur in migratory birds? Direct evidence from long-term satellite tracking of raptors

Raymond H. G. Klaassen, Michael Hake, Roine Strandberg, Ben J. Koks, Christiane Trierweiler, Klaus-Michael Exo, Franz Bairlein, Thomas Alerstam & Mikael Hake
1. Information about when and where animals die is important to understand population regulation. In migratory animals, mortality might occur not only during the stationary periods (e.g. breeding and wintering) but also during the migration seasons. However, the relative importance of population limiting factors during different periods of the year remains poorly understood, and previous studies mainly relied on indirect evidence. 2. Here we provide direct evidence about when and where migrants die by identifying...

Data from: Cuticular hydrocarbon divergence in the jewel wasp Nasonia: evolutionary shifts in chemical communication channels?

Jan Buellesbach, Juergen Gadau, Leo W. Beukeboom, Felix Echinger, Rhitoban Raychoudhury, Jack H. Werren & Thomas Schmitt
The evolution and maintenance of intraspecific communication channels constitutes a key feature of chemical signaling and sexual communication. However, how divergent chemical communication channels evolve while maintaining their integrity for both sender and receiver is poorly understood. In the present study, we compare male and female cuticular hydrocarbon (CHC) profiles in the jewel wasp genus Nasonia, analyze their chemical divergence, and investigate their role as species-specific sexual signaling cues. Males and females of all four...

Data from: Within the genome, long telomeres are more informative than short telomeres with respect to fitness components in a long-lived seabird

Christina Bauch, Peter H. Becker & Simon Verhulst
Telomeres, DNA-protein structures at chromosome ends, shorten with age, and telomere length has been linked to age-related diseases and survival. In vitro studies revealed that the shortest telomeres trigger cell senescence, but whether the shortest telomeres are also the best biomarker of ageing is not known. We measured telomeres in erythrocytes of wild common terns Sterna hirundo using terminal restriction fragment analysis. This yields a distribution of telomere lengths for each sample, and we investigated...

Data from: Haplotype structure, adaptive history and associations with exploratory behaviour of the DRD4 gene region in four great tit (Parus major) populations

Jakob C. Mueller, Peter Korsten, Christine Hermannstädter, Thomas Feulner, Niels J. Dingemanse, Erik Matthysen, Kees Van Oers, Thijs Van Overveld, Samantha C. Patrick, John L. Quinn, Matthias Riemenschneider, Joost M. Tinbergen, Bart Kempenaers & Christine Hermannstaedter
The assessment of genetic architecture and selection history in genes for behavioural traits is fundamental to our understanding of how these traits evolve. The dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) gene is a prime candidate for explaining genetic variation in novelty seeking behaviour, a commonly assayed personality trait in animals. Previously we showed that a single nucleotide polymorphism in exon 3 of this gene is associated with exploratory behaviour in at least one of four Western European...

Data from: Development of a Nasonia vitripennis outbred laboratory population for genetic analysis

Louis Van De Zande, Steven Ferber, Ammerins De Haan, Leo W. Beukeboom, Joost Van Heerwaarden & Bart A. Pannebakker
The parasitoid wasp genus Nasonia has rapidly become a genetic model system for developmental and evolutionary biology. The release of its genome sequence led to the development of high-resolution genomic tools, for both interspecific and intraspecific research, which has resulted in great advances in understanding Nasonia biology. To further advance the utility of Nasonia vitripennis as a genetic model system and to be able to fully exploit the advantages of its fully sequenced and annotated...

Data from: Covariance of paternity and sex with laying order explains male bias in extra-pair offspring in a wild bird population

Oscar Vedder, Michael J. L. Magrath, Marco Van Der Velde & Jan Komdeur
It has been hypothesized that parents increase their fitness by biasing the sex ratio of extra-pair offspring (EPO) towards males. Here, we report a male bias among EPO in a wild population of blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus). This resulted from a decline in both the proportion of males and EPO over the laying order of eggs in the clutch. However, previous studies suggest that, unlike the decline in EPO with laying order, the relationship between...

Data from: Mitogenomic phylogenetics of fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus spp.): genetic evidence for revision of subspecies

Frederick I. Archer, Phillip A. Morin, Brittany L. Hancock-Hanser, Kelly M. Robertson, Matthew S. Leslie, Martine Bérubé, Simone Panigada & Barbara L. Taylor
There are three described subspecies of fin whales (Balaenoptera physalus): B. p. physalus Linnaeus, 1758 in the Northern Hemisphere, B. p. quoyi Fischer, 1829 in the Southern Hemisphere, and a recently described pygmy form, B. p. patachonica Burmeister, 1865. The discrete distribution in the North Pacific and North Atlantic raises the question of whether a single Northern Hemisphere subspecies is valid. We assess phylogenetic patterns using ~16 K base pairs of the complete mitogenome for...

Data from: Hydrocarbon divergence and reproductive isolation in Timema stick insects

Tanja Schwander, Devin Arbuthnott, Regine Gries, Gerhard Gries, Patrik Nosil & Bernard J. Crespi
Background: Individuals commonly prefer certain trait values over others when choosing their mates. If such preferences diverge between populations, they can generate behavioral reproductive isolation and thereby contribute to speciation. Reproductive isolation in insects often involves chemical communication, and cuticular hydrocarbons, in particular, serve as mate recognition signals in many species. We combined data on female cuticular hydrocarbons, interspecific mating propensity, and phylogenetics to evaluate the role of cuticular hydrocarbons in diversification of Timema walking-sticks....

Data from: Differentiation in neutral genes and a candidate gene in the pied flycatcher: using biological archives to track global climate change

Kerstin Kuhn, Klaus Schwenk, Christiaan Both, David Canal, Ulf S. Johansson, Steven Van Der Mije, Till Töpfer & Martin Päckert
Global climate change is one of the major driving forces for adaptive shifts in migration and breeding phenology and possibly impacts demographic changes if a species fails to adapt sufficiently. In Western Europe, pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca) have insufficiently adapted their breeding phenology to the ongoing advance of food peaks within their breeding area and consequently suffered local population declines. We address the question whether this population decline led to a loss of genetic variation,...

Data from: Environmental factors influence both abundance and genetic diversity in a widespread bird species

Yang Liu, Simone Webber, Katharine Bowgen, Lucie Schmaltz, Katharine Bradley, Peter Halvarsson, Mohanad Abdelgadir & Michael Griesser
Genetic diversity is one of the key evolutionary variables that correlate with population size, being of critical importance for population viability and the persistence of species. Genetic diversity can also have important ecological consequences within populations, and in turn, ecological factors may drive patterns of genetic diversity. However, the relationship between the genetic diversity of a population and how this interacts with ecological processes has so far only been investigated in a few studies. Here,...

Data from: The impact of reproductive investment and early-life environmental conditions on senescence: support for the disposable soma hypothesis

Martijn Hammers, David S. Richardson, Terry Burke & Jan Komdeur
Several hypotheses have been put forward to explain the evolution of senescence. One of the leading hypotheses, the disposable soma hypothesis, predicts a trade-off, whereby early-life investment in reproduction leads to late-life declines in survival (survival senescence). Testing this hypothesis in natural populations is challenging, but important for understanding the evolution of senescence. We used the long-term data set from a contained, predator-free population of individually marked Seychelles warblers (Acrocephalus sechellensis) to investigate how age-related...

Registration Year

  • 2013
    14

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    14

Affiliations

  • University of Groningen
    14
  • Institute of Avian Research
    2
  • Wageningen University & Research
    2
  • University of Sheffield
    2
  • Max Planck Institute for Ornithology
    1
  • Sun Yat-sen University
    1
  • Estación Biológica de Doñana
    1
  • University of Antwerp
    1
  • Linnaeus University
    1
  • Université de Sherbrooke
    1