29 Works

Skeleton 1000

Canan Çakirlar

A molecular view on the escape of lipoplexed DNA from the endosome (no trajectories)

Bart Bruininks, Paulo De Souza, Helgi Ingolffson & Siewert Marrink
The use of non-viral vectors for in vivo gene therapy could drastically increase safety, whilst reducing the cost of preparing the vectors. A promising approach to non-viral vectors makes use of DNA/cationic liposome complexes (lipoplexes) to deliver the genetic material. Here we use coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the molecular mechanism underlying efficient DNA transfer from lipoplexes. Our computational fusion experiments of lipoplexes with endosomal membrane models show two distinct modes of transfection: parallel...

High-arctic family planning: earlier spring onset advances age at first reproduction in barnacle geese

Kate Layton-Matthews, Mari Aas Fjelldal, Aline Magdalena Lee, Vidar Grøtan, Maarten J.J.E. Loonen & Brage Bremset Hansen
Quantifying how key life-history traits respond to climatic change is fundamental in understanding and predicting long-term population prospects. Age at first reproduction, which affects fitness and population dynamics, may be influenced by environmental stochasticity but has rarely been directly linked to climate change. Here, we use a case study from the highly seasonal and stochastic environment in high-arctic Svalbard, with strong temporal trends in breeding conditions, to test whether rapid climate warming may induce changes...

Datasets used for the publication: State-dependence explains individual variation in nest defence behaviour in a long-lived bird

Margje E. De Jong, Marion Nicolaus, Rienk W. Fokkema & Maarten J.J.E. Loonen
The uploaded datasets were used to test if variation in states predicts nest defence behaviour (a ‘risky’ behaviour) in a long-lived species, the barnacle goose (Branta leucopsis). Repeated measures of nest defence towards a human intruder (flight initiation distance or FID) of females of known age were collected during 15 breeding seasons. Increasing values of FID represent increasing shyness. Adaptive models have predicted that an individual’s residual reproductive value or ‘asset’ is an important state...

Experimentally increased brood size accelerates actuarial senescence and increases subsequent reproductive effort in a wild bird population

Jelle Boonekamp, Christina Bauch & Simon Verhulst
1. The assumption that reproductive effort decreases somatic state, accelerating ageing, is central to our understanding of life-history variation. Maximal reproductive effort early in life is predicted to be maladaptive by accelerating ageing disproportionally, decreasing fitness. 2. Optimality theory predicts that reproductive effort is restrained early in life to balance the fitness contribution of reproduction against the survival cost induced by the reproductive effort. When adaptive, the level of reproductive restraint is predicted to be...

Community structure of vascular epiphytes: a neutral perspective

Thijs Janzen, Gerhard Zotz & Rampal Etienne
Vascular epiphytes form a diverse group of almost 30,000 species, yet theory concerning their community structure is still largely lacking. We therefore employed simple models of biodiversity, (near-)neutral models, to study to what extent they can explain their community structure. With recently developed tools for (near-)neutral models we analyzed species abundance data from many samples in Central and South America which we divided into four metacommunities (Mesoamerica, Central America, Amazonia and Paraná). For each metacommunity...

Inferring the effect of species interactions on trait evolution

Liang Xu, Sander Van Doorn, Hanno Hildenbrandt & Rampal Etienne
Models of trait evolution form an important part of macroevolutionary biology. The Brownian motion model and Ornstein-Uhlenbeck models have become classic (null) models of character evolution, in which species evolve independently. Recently, models incorporating species interactions have been developed, particularly involving competition where abiotic factors pull species toward an optimal trait value and competitive interactions drive the trait values apart. However, these models assume a fitness function rather than derive it from population dynamics and...

Habitat fragmentation shapes natal dispersal and sociality in an Afrotropical cooperative breeder

Laurence Cousseau, Martijn Hammers, Dries Van De Loock, Beate Apfelbeck, Mwangi Githiru, Erik Matthysen & Luc Lens
It remains poorly understood how effects of anthropogenic activity, such as large-scale habitat fragmentation, impact sociality in animals. In cooperatively breeding species, groups are mostly formed through delayed offspring dispersal, and habitat fragmentation can affect this process in two opposite directions. Increased habitat isolation may increase dispersal costs, promoting delayed dispersal. Alternatively, reduced patch size and quality may decrease benefits of philopatry, promoting dispersal. Here, we test both predictions in a cooperatively breeding bird (placid...

Skeleton 225

Canan Çaniklar

Skeleton 1000

Canan Çakirlar

Skeleton 851

Canan Çakirlar

Data from: With a little help from my friends – Physiological integration facilitates invasion of wetland grass Elymus athericus into flooded soils

Peter Mueller, Hai T. Do, Christian Smit, Christoph Reisdorff, Kai Jensen & Stefanie Nolte
Tidal wetlands worldwide are undergoing rapid invasions by tall-growing clonal grasses. Prominent examples are invasions by species of the genera Spartina, Phragmites, and Elymus. The responsible physiological and ecological drivers of these invasions are poorly understood. Physiological integration (PI) is a key trait of clonal plants, which enables the exchange of resources among ramets. We investigated PI in Elymus athericus, which has been rapidly spreading from high-marsh into low-marsh environments of European salt marshes during...

Data from: Nest attentiveness drives nest predation in arctic sandpipers

Nicolas Meyer, Loïc Bollache, François-Xavier Dechaume-Moncharmont, Jerôme Moreau, Eve Afonso, Anders Angerbjörn, Joël Bety, Dorothee Ehrich, Vladimir Gilg, Marie-Andrée Giroux, Jannik Hansen, Richard Lanctot, Johannes Lang, Nicolas Lecomte, Laura McKinnon, Jeroen Reneerkens, Sarah Saalfeld, Brigitte Sabard, Niels Schmidt, Benoît Sittler, Paul Smith, Aleksandr Sokolov, Vasiliy Sokolov, Natalya Sokolova, Rob Van Bemmelen … & Olivier Gilg
Most birds incubate their eggs to allow embryo development. This behaviour limits the ability of adults to perform other activities. Hence, incubating adults trade-off incubation and nest protection with foraging to meet their own needs. Parents can either cooperate to sustain this trade-off or incubate alone. The main cause of reproductive failure at this reproductive stage is predation and adults reduce this risk by keeping the nest location secret. Arctic sandpipers are interesting biological models...

The roles of temperature, nest predators and information parasites for geographical variation in egg covering behaviour of tits (Paridae)

Olli Loukola, Peter Adamik, Frank Adriaensen, Emilio Barba, Blandine Doligez, Einar Flensted-Jensen, Tapio Eeva, Sami Kivelä, Toni Laaksonen, Chiara Morosinotto, Raivo Mänd, Petri Niemelä, Vladimir Remeš, Jelmer Samplonius, Manrico Sebastiano, Juan Carlos Senar, Tore Slagsvold, Alberto Sorace, Barbara Tschirren, János Török & Jukka Forsman
Aim: Nest building is widespread among animals. Nests may provide receptacles for eggs, developing offspring and the parents, and protect them from adverse environmental conditions. Nests may also indicate the quality of the territory and its owner and can be considered as an extended phenotype of its builder(s). Nests may, thus, function as a sexual and social signal. Here, we examined ecological and abiotic factors—temperature, nest predation and interspecific information utilization—shaping geographical variation in a...

Environmental change reduces body condition, but not population growth, in a high-arctic herbivore

Kate Layton-Matthews, Vidar Grøtan, Brage Bremset Hansen, Maarten J. J.E. Loonen, Eva Fuglei & Dylan Childs
Environmental change influences fitness-related traits and demographic rates, which in herbivores are often linked to resource-driven variation in body condition. Coupled body condition-demographic responses may therefore be important for herbivore population dynamics in fluctuating environments, such as the Arctic. We applied a transient Life-Table Response Experiment (‘transient-LTRE’) to demographic data from Svalbard barnacle geese (Branta leucopsis), to quantify their population-dynamic responses to changes in body mass. We partitioned contributions from direct and delayed demographic and...

Branching patterns in phylogenies cannot distinguish diversity-dependent diversification from time-dependent diversification

Theo Pannetier, César Martinez, Lynsey Bunnefeld & Rampal S. Etienne
One of the primary goals of macroevolutionary biology has been to explain general trends in long-term diversity patterns, including whether such patterns correspond to an up-scaling of processes occurring at lower scales. Reconstructed phylogenies often show decelerated lineage accumulation over time. This pattern has often been interpreted as the result of diversity-dependent diversification, where the accumulation of species causes diversification to decrease through niche filling. However, other processes can also produce such a slowdown, including...

Geolocators lead to better measures of timing and renesting in Black-tailed Godwits and reveal the bias of traditional observational methods

Mo Verhoeven, Jelle Loonstra, Alice McBride, Pablo Macias, Wiebe Kaspersma, Jos Hooijmeijer, Egbert Van Der Velde, Christiaan Both, Nathan Senner & Theunis Piersma
Long‐term population studies can identify changes in population dynamics over time. However, to realize meaningful conclusions, these studies rely on accurate measurements of individual traits and population characteristics. Here, we evaluate the accuracy of the observational methods used to measure reproductive traits in individually marked black‐tailed godwits (Limosa limosa limosa). By comparing estimates from traditional methods with data obtained from light‐level geolocators, we provide an accurate estimate of the likelihood of renesting in godwits and...

Evolution of chain migration in an aerial insectivorous bird, the common swift Apus apus

Susanne Akesson, Phil Atkinson, Ana Bermejo, Javier De La Puente, Mauro Ferri, Chris Hewson, Jan Holmgren, Erich Kaiser, Lyndon Kearsley, Raymond Klaassen, Heikki Kolunen, Gittan Matsson, Fausto Minelli, Gabriel Norevik, Hannu Pietiäinen, Navinder J Singh, Fernando Spina, Lukas Viktora & Anders Hedenstrom
Spectacular long-distance migration has evolved repeatedly in animals enabling exploration of resources separated in time and space. In birds, these patterns are largely driven by seasonality, cost of migration, and asymmetries in competition leading most often to leap-frog migration, where northern breeding populations winter furthest to the south. Here we show that the highly aerial common swift Apus apus, spending the non-breeding period on the wing, instead exhibits a rarely-found chain migration pattern, where the...

European soil seed bank communities across a climate and land-cover gradient

Jan Plue, Hans Van Calster, Inger Auestad, Sofia Basto, Reneé M. Bekker, Hans Henrik Bruun, Richard Chevalier, Guillaume Decocq, Ulf Grandin, Martin Hermy, Hans Jacquemyn, Anna Jakobsson, Rein Kalamees, Rob H. Marrs, Bryndis Marteinsdóttir, Per Milberg, Robin J. Pakeman, Gareth Phoenix, Ken Thompson, Vigdis Vandvik, Markus Wagner, Sara A.O. Cousins, Ove Eriksson, Jamshid Ghorbani, Małgorzata Jankowska-Błaszczuk … & Alistair G. Auffret
This is the data set used for the publication Buffering effects of soil seed banks on plant community composition in response to land use and climate, published in the journal Global Ecology and Biogeography. Aim. Climate and land use are key determinants of biodiversity, with past and ongoing changes posing serious threats to global ecosystems. Unlike most other organism groups, plant species can possess dormant life-history stages such as soil seed banks, which may help...

MigrAgent

Rocco Paolillo & Wander Jager
MigrAgent simulates migration flows of a population from a home country to a host country and mutual adaptation of a migrant and local population post-migration. Agents accept interactions in intercultural networks depending on their degree of conservatism. Conservatism is a group-level parameter normally distributed within each ethnic group. Individual conservatism changes as function of reciprocity of interaction in intergroup experiences of acceptance or rejection. The aim of MigrAgent is to unfold different outcomes of integration,...

Data from: Contrasting patterns of functional diversity in coffee root fungal communities associated with organic and conventionally-managed fields

Laura Aldrich-Wolfe, Elizabeth Sternhagen, Logan Schmaltz, Riley McGlynn, Eliza Hartmann, Peter Johnson, W. Gaya Shivega, Katie Black, Rebecca Asheim Keller & Stefanie Vink
The structure and function of fungal communities in the coffee rhizosphere is shaped by crop environment. Because coffee can be grown along a management continuum from conventional application of pesticides and fertilizers in full sun to organic management in a shaded understory, we used coffee fields to hold host constant while comparing rhizosphere fungal communities in markedly different environmental conditions with regard to shade and inputs. We characterized the shade and soil environment in 25...

Data from: Modulation of yaw stability with an unstable rigid body and a stabilising caudal fin in the yellow boxfish (Ostracion cubicus)

Pim G. Boute, Sam Van Wassenbergh & Eize J. Stamhuis
Despite that boxfishes have a rigid carapace that restricts body undulation, they are highly manoeuvrable and manage to swim with remarkably dynamic stability. Recent research has indicated that the rigid body shape of boxfishes shows an inherently unstable response in its rotations caused by course-disturbing flows. Hence, any net stabilising effect should come from the fish’s fins. The aim of the current study was to determine the effect of the surface area and orientation of...

Data from: Sex-specific telomere length and dynamics in relation to age and reproductive success in Cory’s Shearwaters

Christina Bauch, Marie Claire Gatt, José Pedro Granadeiro, Simon Verhulst & Paulo Catry
Individuals in free-living animal populations generally differ substantially in reproductive success, lifespan and other fitness-related traits and the molecular mechanisms underlying this variation are poorly understood. Telomere length and dynamics are candidate traits explaining this variation, as long telomeres predict a higher survival probability and telomere loss has been shown to reflect experienced “life stress”. However, telomere dynamics among very long-lived species are unresolved. Additionally, it is generally not well understood how telomeres relate with...

Temporally consistent species differences in parasite infection but no evidence for rapid parasite-mediated speciation in Lake Victoria cichlid fish

Tiziana P Gobbin, Maarten PM Vanhove, Antoine Pariselle, Ton GG Groothuis, Martine E Maan & Ole Seehausen
Parasites may have strong eco-evolutionary interactions with their hosts. Consequently, they may contribute to host diversification. The radiation of cichlid fish in Lake Victoria provides a good model to study the role of parasites in the early stages of speciation. We investigated patterns of macroparasite infection in a community of 17 sympatric cichlids from a recent radiation and 2 older species from 2 non-radiating lineages, to explore the opportunity for parasite-mediated speciation. Host species had...

The role of preadaptation, propagule pressure and competition in the colonization of new habitats

Adriana Alzate Vallejo, Renske Onstein, Rampal S. Etienne & Dries Bonte
To successfully colonize new habitats, organisms not only need to gain access to it, they also need to cope with the selective pressures imposed by the local biotic and abiotic conditions. The number of immigrants, the preadaptation to the local habitat and the presence of competitors are important factors determining the success of colonization. Here, using two experimental set-ups, we studied the effect of interspecific competition in combination with propagule pressure and preadaptation on the...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    29

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    28
  • Software
    1

Affiliations

  • University of Groningen
    29
  • University of Antwerp
    3
  • University of Sheffield
    3
  • Ghent University
    2
  • University of East Anglia
    2
  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
    2
  • University of Tartu
    2
  • Stockholm University
    2
  • University of Padua
    1
  • National Research Institute for Agriculture, Food and Environment
    1