26 Works

Data from: Management actions shape dung beetle community structure and functional traits in restored tallgrass prairie

Nicholas A. Barber, Sheryl C. Hosler, Holly P. Jones & Melissa Nelson
1. Ecosystem restoration often focuses on reestablishing species richness and diversity of native organisms, especially plants. However, effective restoration requires re-establishment of ecosystem functions and processes by all trophic levels. Functional trait descriptions of communities, including decomposer communities, may provide more comprehensive evaluations of restoration activities and management than taxonomic community metrics alone. 2. We examined species and functional trait composition of dung beetle (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae, Geotrupidae) communities across a 3-31 year chronosequence of restored...

Data from: Global hotspots for coastal ecosystem-based adaptation

Holly P. Jones, Barry A. Nickel, Tanja Srebotnjak, Will Turner, Mariano Gonzalez-Roglich, Erika Zavaleta & David G. Hole
Helping the world’s coastal communities adapt to climate change impacts requires evaluating the vulnerability of coastal communities and assessing adaptation options. This includes understanding the potential for ‘natural’ infrastructure (ecosystems and the biodiversity that underpins them) to reduce communities’ vulnerability, alongside more traditional ‘hard’ infrastructure approaches. Here we present a spatially explicit global evaluation of the vulnerability of coastal-dwelling human populations to key climate change exposures and explore the potential for coastal ecosystems to help...

Reintroduced grazers and prescribed fire effects on beetle assemblage structure and function in restored grasslands

Nicholas Barber, Melissa Nelson, Sheryl Hosler, Fabian Boetzl & Holly Jones
Ecological restoration seeks to re-establish functioning ecosystems, but planning and evaluation often focus on taxonomic community structure and neglect consumers and their functional roles. The functional trait composition of insect assemblages, which make up the majority of animal diversity in many systems, can reveal how they are affected by restoration management and the consequences for ecosystem function. We sampled ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) assemblages in restored tallgrass prairies varying in management with prescribed fire and...

Animal Biodiversity at Nachusa Grasslands

Peter Guiden
A primary goal of ecological restoration is to increase biodiversity in degraded ecosystems. However, the success of restoration ecology is often assessed by measuring the response of a single functional group or trophic level to restoration, without considering how restoration affects multitrophic interactions that shape biodiversity. An ecosystem-wide approach to restoration is therefore necessary to understand whether animal responses to restoration, such as changes in biodiversity, are facilitated by changes in plant communities (plant-driven effects)...

Data from: Sunning themselves in heaps, knots, and snarls: the extraordinary abundance and demography of island watersnakes

Richard B. King, Kristin M. Stanford & Peter C. Jones
Snakes represent a sizable fraction of vertebrate biodiversity but until recently, data on their demography has been sparse. Consequently, generalizations regarding patterns of variation are weak and the potential for population projections are limited. We address this information gap through an analysis of spatial and temporal variation in demography (population size, annual survival, realized population growth) of the Lake Erie Watersnake, Nerodia sipedon insularum, and a review of snake survival more generally. Our study spans...

Data and R code for: Temperature-induced multispecies cohort effects in sympatric snakes

Richard King
In reptiles, reproductive maturity is often determined by size rather than age. Consequently, growth early in life may influence population dynamics through effects on generation time and survival to reproduction. Because reproductive phenology and pre- and post-natal growth are temperature-dependent, environmental conditions may induce multi-species cohort effects on body size in sympatric reptiles. I present evidence of this using ten years of neonatal size data for three sympatric viviparous snakes, Dekay’s Brownsnakes (Storeria dekayi), Red-bellied...

Data from: Root herbivory indirectly affects above- and belowground community members and directly reduces plant performance

Nicholas A. Barber, Nelson J. Milano, E. Toby Kiers, Nina Theis, Vanessa Bartolo, Ruth V. Hazzard & Lynn S. Adler
1.There is widespread recognition that above- and below-ground organisms are linked through their interactions with host plants that span terrestrial subsystems. In addition to direct effects on plants, soil organisms such as root herbivores can indirectly alter interactions between plants and other community members, with potentially important effects on plant growth and fitness. 2. We manipulated root herbivory by Acalymma vittatum in Cucumis sativus to determine indirect effects on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, leaf herbivory, the...

Data from: Island-wide aridity did not trigger recent megafaunal extinctions in Madagascar

Brooke E. Crowley, Laurie R. Godfrey, Richard J. Bankoff, George H. Perry, Brendan J. Culleton, Douglas J. Kennett, Michael R. Sutherland, Karen E. Samonds & David A. Burney
Researchers are divided about the relative importance of people versus climate in triggering the Late Holocene extinctions of the endemic large-bodied fauna on the island of Madagascar. Specifically, a dramatic and synchronous decline in arboreal pollen and increase in grass pollen ca. 1,000 years ago has been alternatively interpreted as evidence for aridification, increased human activity, or both. As aridification and anthropogenic deforestation can have similar effects on vegetation, resolving which of these factors (if...

Data from: Attracting mutualists and antagonists: plant trait variation explains the distribution of specialist floral herbivores and pollinators on crops and wild gourds

N. Theis, N. A. Barber, S. D. Gillespie, R. V. Hazzard & L. S. Adler
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Floral traits play important roles in pollinator attraction and defense against floral herbivory. However, plants may experience trade-offs between conspicuousness to pollinators and herbivore attraction. Comparative studies provide an excellent framework to examine the role of multiple traits shaping mutualist and antagonist interactions. METHODS: To assess whether putative defensive and attractive traits predict species interactions, we grew 20 different Cucurbitaceae species and varieties in the field to measure interactions with pollinators...

Data from: Size matters: individual variation in ectotherm growth and asymptotic size

Richard B. King, Kristin M. Stanford, Peter C. Jones & Kent Bekker
Body size, and, by extension, growth has impacts on physiology, survival, attainment of sexual maturity, fecundity, generation time, and population dynamics, especially in ectotherm animals that often exhibit extensive growth following attainment of sexual maturity. Frequently, growth is analyzed at the population level, providing useful population mean growth parameters but ignoring individual variation that is also of ecological and evolutionary significance. Our long-term study of Lake Erie Watersnakes, Nerodia sipedon insularum, provides data sufficient for...

Data from: The ecological stage changes benefits of mate choice and drives preference divergence

Robin Tinghitella, Alycia Lackey, Catherine Durso, Jennifer Koop & Janette Boughman
Preference divergence is thought to contribute to reproductive isolation. Ecology can alter the way selection acts on female preferences, making them most likely to diverge when ecological conditions vary among populations. We present a novel mechanism for ecologically dependent sexual selection, termed ‘the ecological stage’ to highlight its ecological dependence. Our hypothesized mechanism emphasizes that males and females interact over mating in a specific ecological context, and different ecological conditions change the costs and benefits...

Fake-ID Use Among Fraternity/Sorority Members

William R. Molasso

Perceived Hearing Loss and Availability of Audiologists in Appalachia

Charles B. Pudrith, Ellyn Grider & Blythe Kitner, Northern Illinois University
Introduction: There is a high demand for audiologists throughout the United States. Previous research has supported an additional demand for these providers within Appalachia. Purpose: The purpose of the study was to determine if Appalachia has a disproportionally high demand for audiologists compared to the rest of the United States. Methods: A cross-sectional retrospective study was performed with population data from the Appalachian Regional Commission, the American Academy of Audiology, and the United States Census...

Data from: Leaf shape tracks transitions across forest-grassland boundaries in the grass family (Poaceae)

Timothy Jay Gallaher, Dean C. Adams, Lakshmi Attigala, Sean V. Burke, Joseph M. Craine, Melvin R. Duvall, Phillip C. Klahs, Emma Sherratt, William P. Wysocki & Lynn G. Clark
Grass leaf shape is a strong indicator of their habitat. Linear leaves predominate in open areas and more ovate leaves distinguish forest-associated grasses. This pattern among extant species suggests that ancestral shifts between forest and open habitats may have coincided with changes in leaf shape or size. We tested relationships between habitat, climate, photosynthetic pathway and leaf shape and size in a phylogenetic framework to evaluate drivers of leaf shape and size variation over the...

Introduction to \"Machine Communication\"

Zachary J. McDowell & David J. Gunkel

Arthropod predation of vertebrates structures trophic dynamics in island ecosystems

Luke Halpin, Daniel Terrington, Holly Jones, Rowan Mott, Wei Wen Wong, David Dow, Nicholas Carlile & Rohan Clarke
Arthropod predation of vertebrates structures trophic dynamics in island ecosystems On isolated islands, large arthropods can play an important functional role in ecosystem dynamics. On the Norfolk Islands group, South Pacific, we monitored the diet and foraging activity of an endemic chilopod, the Phillip Island centipede (Cormocephalus coynei), and used a stable isotope mixing model to estimate dietary proportions. Phillip Island centipede diet is represented by vertebrate animals (48%) and invertebrates (52%), with 30.5% consisting...

Raw radiocarbon dates and stable carbon isotope values for individual bone specimens from Madagascar's Central Highlands.

Brooke Crowley, Laurie Godfrey, Karen Samonds & James Hansford
This commentary has no abstract.

Hair phenotype diversity across Indriidae lemurs

Elizabeth Tapanes, Rachel Jacobs, Ian Harryman, , Mitchell Irwin, Jason Kamilar & Brenda Bradley
Objectives: Hair (i.e., pelage/fur) is a salient feature of primate (including human) diversity and evolution—serving functions tied to thermoregulation, protection, camouflage, and signaling—but wild primate pelage evolution remains relatively understudied. Specifically, assessing multiple hypotheses across distinct phylogenetic scales is essential but is rarely conducted. We examine whole body hair color and density variation across Indriidae (Avahi, Indri, Propithecus)—a lineage that, like humans, exhibits vertical posture (i.e., their whole bodies are vertical to the sun). Materials...

Data from: Species richness change across spatial scales

Jonathan M. Chase, Brian J. McGill, Patrick L. Thompson, Laura H. Antão, Amanda E. Bates, Shane A. Blowes, Maria Dornelas, Andrew Gonzalez, Anne E. Magurran, Sarah R. Supp, Marten Winter, Anne D. Bjorkmann, Helge Bruelheide, Jarrett E.K. Byrnes, Juliano Sarmento Cabral, Robin Ehali, Catalina Gomez, Hector M. Guzman, Forest Isbell, Isla H. Myers-Smith, Holly P. Jones, Jessica Hines, Mark Vellend, Conor Waldock & Mary O'Connor
Humans have elevated global extinction rates and thus lowered global-scale species richness. However, there is no a priori reason to expect that losses of global species richness should always, or even often, trickle down to losses of species richness at regional and local scales, even though this relationship is often assumed. Here, we show that scale can modulate our estimates of species richness change through time in the face of anthropogenic pressures, but not in...

Data from: Restoration and repair of Earth's damaged ecosystems

Holly P. Jones, Peter C. Jones, Edward B. Barbier, Ryan C. Blackburn, Jose M. Rey Benayas, Karen D. Holl, Michelle McCrackin, Paula Meli, Daniel Montoya & David Moreno Mateos
Given that few ecosystems on Earth have been unaffected by humans, restoring them holds great promise for stemming the biodiversity crisis and ensuring ecosystem services are provided to humanity. Nonetheless, few studies have documented the recovery of ecosystems globally or the rates at which ecosystems recover. Even fewer have addressed the added benefit of actively restoring ecosystems versus allowing them to recover without human intervention following the cessation of a disturbance. Our meta analysis of...

Data from: Phylogenetic diversity is maintained despite richness losses over time in restored tallgrass prairie plant communities

Nicholas A. Barber, Holly P. Jones, Melvin R. Duvall, William P. Wysocki, Michael J. Hansen & David J. Gibson
Ecosystem restoration is an important tool for mitigating biodiversity loss and recovering critical ecosystem services to humanity, but restoration rarely takes into account the evolutionary attributes of the community being restored. Phylogenetic diversity (PD) represents a potentially valuable measure of restoration success because it can correlate with functional trait diversity that drives ecosystem function. However, PD patterns in restored communities are rarely assessed. We surveyed plant communities in restored tallgrass prairies 2–19 years old and...

Data from: Novel opsin gene variation in large-bodied, diurnal lemurs

Rachel L. Jacobs, Tammie S. MacFie, Amanda N. Spriggs, Andrea L. Baden, Toni Lyn Morelli, Mitchell T. Irwin, Richard R. Lawler, Jennifer Pastorini, Mireya Mayor, Runhua Lei, Ryan Culligan, Melissa T. R. Hawkins, Peter M. Kappeler, Patricia C. Wright, Edward E. Louis, Nicholas I. Mundy & Brenda J. Bradley
Some primate populations include both trichromatic and dichromatic (red–green colour blind) individuals due to allelic variation at the X-linked opsin locus. This polymorphic trichromacy is well described in day-active New World monkeys. Less is known about colour vision in Malagasy lemurs, but, unlike New World monkeys, only some day-active lemurs are polymorphic, while others are dichromatic. The evolutionary pressures underlying these differences in lemurs are unknown, but aspects of species ecology, including variation in activity...

Data from: Microsatellite and major histocompatibility complex variation in an endangered rattlesnake, the Eastern Massasauga (Sistrurus catenatus)

Collin P. Jaeger, Melvin R. Duvall, Bradley J. Swanson, Christopher A. Phillips, Michael J. Dreslik, Sarah J. Baker & Richard B. King
Genetic diversity is fundamental to maintaining the long-term viability of populations, yet reduced genetic variation is often associated with small, isolated populations. To examine the relationship between demography and genetic variation, variation at hypervariable loci (e.g., microsatellite DNA loci) is often measured. However, these loci are selectively neutral (or near neutral) and may not accurately reflect genomewide variation. Variation at functional trait loci, such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), can provide a better assessment...

Continued adaptation of C4 photosynthesis after an initial burst of changes in the Andropogoneae grasses

Matheus Bianconi, Jan Hackel, Maria Vorontsova, Adriana Alberti, Watchara Arthan, Sean Burke, Melvin Duvall, Elizabeth Kellogg, Sébastien Lavergne, Michael McKain, Alexandre Meunier, Colin Osborne, Paweena Traiperm, Pascal-Antoine Christin & Guillaume Besnard
C4 photosynthesis is a complex trait that sustains fast growth and high productivity in tropical and subtropical conditions and evolved repeatedly in flowering plants. One of the major C4 lineages is Andropogoneae, a group of ~ 1,200 grass species that includes some of the world's most important crops and species dominating tropical and some temperate grasslands. Previous efforts to understand C4 evolution in the group have compared a few model C4 plants to distantly related...

A Content Analysis of a Decade of Fraternity/Sorority Scholarship in Student Affairs Research Journals

William R. Molasso

Registration Year

  • 2022
    3
  • 2021
    5
  • 2020
    6
  • 2019
    3
  • 2018
    2
  • 2016
    5
  • 2015
    2

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    22
  • Journal Article
    2
  • Text
    2

Affiliations

  • Northern Illinois University
    26
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst
    7
  • Stanford University
    2
  • George Washington University
    2
  • University of Cincinnati
    2
  • San Diego State University
    2
  • Elms College
    2
  • Department of Planning and Environment
    1
  • Donald Danforth Plant Science Center
    1
  • University of Adelaide
    1