34 Works

Data from: Metapopulation dominance and genomic-island acquisition of Bradyrhizobium with superior catabolic capabilities

Amanda C. Hollowell, John U. Regus, David Turissini, Kelsey A. Gano-Cohen, Roxanne Bantay, Andrew Bernardo, Devora Moore, Jonathan Pham & Joel L. Sachs
Root nodule forming rhizobia exhibit a bipartite lifestyle, replicating in soil and also within plant cells where they fix nitrogen for legume hosts. Host control models posit that legume hosts act as a predominant selective force on rhizobia, but few studies have examined rhizobial fitness in natural populations. Here, we genotyped and phenotyped Bradyrhizobium isolates across >800km of the native Acmispon strigosus host range. We sequenced chromosomal genes expressed under free-living conditions and accessory symbiosis...

Data from: Using collision cones to assess biological deconfliction methods

Natalie L. Brace, Tyson L. Hedrick, Diane H. Theriault, Nathan W. Fuller, Zheng Wu, Margrit Betke, Julia K. Parrish, Daniel Grünbaum & Kristi A. Morgansen
Biological systems consistently outperform autonomous systems governed by engineered algorithms in their ability to reactively avoid collisions. To better understand this discrepancy, a collision avoidance algorithm was applied to frames of digitized video trajectory data from bats, swallows and fish (Myotis velifer, Petrochelidon pyrrhonota and Danio aequipinnatus). Information available from visual cues, specifically relative position and velocity, was provided to the algorithm which used this information to define collision cones that allowed the algorithm to...

Data from: Foraging at the edge of the world: low‐altitude, high‐speed maneuvering in barn swallows

Douglas R. Warrick, Tyson L. Hedrick, Andrew A. Biewener, Kristen E. Crandell & Bret W. Tobalske
While prior studies of swallow manoeuvering have focused on slow-speed flight and obstacle avoidance in still air, swallows survive by foraging at high speeds in windy environments. Recent advances in field-portable, high-speed video systems, coupled with precise anemometry, permit measures of high-speed aerial performance of birds in a natural state. We undertook the present study to test: (i) the manner in which barn swallows (Hirundo rustica) may exploit wind dynamics and ground effect while foraging...

Data from: Female and male life tables for seven wild primate species

Anne M. Bronikowski, Marina Cords, Susan C. Alberts, Jeanne Altmann, Diane K. Brockman, Linda M. Fedigan, Anne Pusey, Tara Stoinski, Karen B. Strier & William F. Morris
We provide male and female census count data, age-specific survivorship, and female age-specific fertility estimates for populations of seven wild primates that have been continuously monitored for at least 29 years: sifaka (Propithecus verreauxi) in Madagascar; muriqui (Brachyteles hypoxanthus) in Brazil; capuchin (Cebus capucinus) in Costa Rica; baboon (Papio cynocephalus) and blue monkey (Cercopithecus mitis) in Kenya; chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) in Tanzania; and gorilla (Gorilla beringei) in Rwanda. Using one-year age-class intervals, we computed point...

Data from: Host genotype and age shape the leaf and root microbiomes of a wild perennial plant

Maggie R. Wagner, Derek S. Lundberg, Tijana G. Del Rio, Susannah G. Tringe, Jeffery L. Dangl & Thomas Mitchell-Olds
Bacteria living on and in leaves and roots influence many aspects of plant health, so the extent of a plant’s genetic control over its microbiota is of great interest to crop breeders and evolutionary biologists. Laboratory-based studies, because they poorly simulate true environmental heterogeneity, may misestimate or totally miss the influence of certain host genes on the microbiome. Here we report a large-scale field experiment to disentangle the effects of genotype, environment, age and year...

Data from: Three-dimensional simulation for fast forward flight of a calliope hummingbird

Jialei Song, Bret W. Tobalske, Donald R. Powers, Tyson L. Hedrick & Haoxiang Luo
We present a computational study of flapping-wing aerodynamics of a calliope hummingbird (Selasphorus calliope) during fast forward flight. Three-dimensional wing kinematics were incorporated into the model by extracting time-dependent wing position from high-speed videos of the bird flying in a wind tunnel at 8.3 m s−1. The advance ratio, i.e. the ratio between flight speed and average wingtip speed, is around one. An immersed-boundary method was used to simulate flow around the wings and bird...

Data from: Local context drives infection of grasses by vector-borne generalist viruses

Elizabeth T. Borer, Eric W. Seabloom, Charles E. Mitchell & Alison G. Power
Host characteristics commonly determine infection risk, but infection can also be mediated by regional- or local-scale variation in the biotic and abiotic environment. Experiments can clarify the relative importance of these factors. We quantified drivers of infection by barley and cereal yellow dwarf viruses (B/CYDV), a group of generalist, vector-borne grass pathogens, at hierarchically nested spatial scales (105–1 m) by planting individuals of six common grass species into five Pacific Coast grassland sites spanning 7°...

Data from: Comparison of cerebral blood volume and plasma volume in untreated intracranial tumors

Soha Bazyar, Joana Ramalho, Cihat Eldeniz, Hongyu An, Yueh Lee & Yueh Z. Lee
Purpose: Plasma volume and blood volume are imaging-derived parameters that are often used to evaluation intracranial tumors. Physiologically, these parameters are directly related, but their two different methods of measurements, T1-dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)- and T2-dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC)-MR utilize different model assumptions and approaches. This poses the question of whether the interchangeable use of T1-DCE-MRI derived fractionated plasma volume (vp) and relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) assessed using DSC-MRI, particularly in glioblastoma, is reliable,...

Data from: Coral reef degradation is not correlated with local human population density

John F. Bruno
The global decline of reef-building corals is understood to be due to a combination of local and global stressors. However, many reef scientists assume that local factors predominate and that isolated reefs, far from human activities, are generally healthier and more resilient. Here we show that coral reef degradation is not correlated with human population density. This suggests that local factors such as fishing and pollution are having minimal effects or that their impacts are...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    34

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    34

Affiliations

  • University of North Carolina
    34
  • University of Montana
    2
  • University of Washington
    2
  • University of California System
    2
  • Duke University
    2
  • University of Georgia
    2
  • University of California, Berkeley
    2
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    2
  • Indiana University Bloomington
    2
  • University of Mississippi
    2