39 Works

Data from: The analysis and interpretation of critical temperatures

Joel G. Kingsolver & James Umbanhowar
Critical temperatures are widely used to quantify the upper and lower thermal limits of organisms. But measured critical temperatures often vary with methodological details, leading to spirited discussions about the potential consequences of stress and acclimation during the experiments. We review a model based on the simple assumption that failure rate increases with increasing temperature, independent of previous temperature exposure, water loss or metabolism during the experiment. The model predicts that mean critical thermal maximal...

Data from: The evolution of sexual imprinting through reinforcement

D. Justin Yeh, Janette W. Boughman, Glenn-Peter Saetre & Maria R. Servedio
Reinforcement is the process whereby assortative mating evolves due to selection against costly hybridization. Sexual imprinting could evolve as a mechanism of reinforcement, decreasing hybridization, or it could potentially increase hybridization in genetically purebred offspring of heterospecific social pairs. We use deterministic population genetic simulations to explore conditions under which sexual imprinting can evolve through reinforcement. We demonstrate that a sexual imprinting component of female preference can evolve as a one-allele assortative mating mechanism by...

Data from: Improved access to early diagnosis and complete treatment of malaria in Odisha, India

Sreya Pradhan, Madan M. Pradhan, Ambarish Dutta, Naman K. Shah, Pyare L. Joshi, Khageshwar Pradhan, S.K. Sharma, Penny Grewal Daumerie, Jaya Banerji, Stephan Duparc, Kamini Mendis, Shiva Murugasampillay, Neena Valecha, Anupkumar R. Anvikar & S. K. Sharma
Background In 2013, the Comprehensive Case Management Programme (CCMP) was initiated to assess the impact of universal access to diagnosis and treatment and improved surveillance on malaria transmission in different settings in Odisha state, India. Methods Pairs of intervention and control sub-districts (blocks), matched on malaria incidence were selected in four districts with different transmission intensities. CCMP activities included training and supervision, ensuring no stock-outs of malaria tests and drugs, analysing verified surveillance data, stratifying...

Data from: Non-adaptive female pursuit of extra-pair copulations can evolve through hitchhiking

Nan Lyu, Maria R. Servedio & Yue-Hua Sun
Mounting evidence has indicated that engaging in extra-pair copulations (EPCs) might be maladaptive or detrimental to females. It is unclear why such non-adaptive female behavior evolves. In this study, we test two hypotheses about the evolution of female EPC behavior using population genetic models. First, we find that both male preference for allocating extra-effort to seek EPCs and female pursuit behavior without costs can be maintained and remain polymorphic in a population via frequency dependent...

Data from: Upper atmosphere heating from ocean-generated acoustic wave energy

Daniel C. Bowman & Jonathan M. Lees
Colliding sea surface waves generate the ocean microbarom, an acoustic signal that may transmit significant energy to the upper atmosphere. Previous estimates of acoustic energy flux from the ocean microbarom and mountain/wind interactions are on the order of 0.01 to 1 mW/m2, heating the thermosphere by tens of degrees Kelvin per day. We captured up going ocean microbarom waves with a balloon borne infrasound microphone; the maximum acoustic energy flux was approximately 0.05 mW/m2. This...

Data from: Association of orthostatic hypotension with incident dementia, stroke, and cognitive decline

Andreea M. Rawlings, Stephen P. Juraschek, Gerardo Heiss, Tim Hughes, Michelle L. Meyer, Elizabeth Selvin, A. Richey Sharrett, B. Gwen Windham & Rebecca F. Gottesman
Objective: To examine associations between orthostatic hypotension (OH) with dementia and long-term cognitive decline, and update previously published results in the same cohort for stroke with an additional 16 years of follow-up. Methods: We analyzed data from 11709 participants without a history of coronary heart disease or stroke who attended the baseline exam (1987-1989) of the prospective Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study. OH was defined as a drop in systolic blood pressure (BP) of...

Data from: Efficient and accurate extraction of in vivo calcium signals from microendoscopic video data

Pengcheng Zhou, Shanna L. Resendez, Jose Rodriguez-Romaguera, Jessica C. Jimenez, Shay Q. Neufeld, Andrea Giovannucci, Johannes Friedrich, Eftychios A Pnevmatikakis, Garret D. Stuber, Rene Hen, Mazen A. Kheirbek, Bernardo L. Sabatini, Robert E. Kass & Liam Paninski
In vivo calcium imaging through microendoscopic lenses enables imaging of previously inaccessible neuronal populations deep within the brains of freely moving animals. However, it is computationally challenging to extract single-neuronal activity from microendoscopic data, because of the very large background fluctuations and high spatial overlaps intrinsic to this recording modality. Here, we describe a new constrained matrix factorization approach to accurately separate the background and then demix and denoise the neuronal signals of interest. We...

Data from: Investigating behavioral drivers of seasonal Shiga-Toxigenic Escherichia Coli (STEC) patterns in grazing cattle using an agent-based model

Daniel E. Dawson, Jocelyn H. Keung, Monica G. Napoles, Michael R. Vella, Shi Chen, Mike Sanderson, Cristina Lanzas & Michael W. Sanderson
The causes of seasonal variability in pathogen transmission are not well understood, and have not been comprehensively investigated. In an example for enteric pathogens, incidence of Escherichia coli O157 (STEC) colonization in cattle is consistently higher during warmer months compared to cooler months in various cattle production systems. However, actual mechanisms for this seasonality remain elusive. In addition, the influence of host (cattle) behavior on this pattern has not been thoroughly considered. To that end,...

Data from: Using museum specimens to track morphological shifts through climate change

Heidi J. MacLean, Matthew E. Nielsen, Joel G. Kingsolver & Lauren B. Buckley
Museum specimens offer a largely untapped resource for detecting morphological shifts in response to climate change. However, morphological shifts can be obscured by shifts in phenology or distribution or sampling biases. Additionally, interpreting phenotypic shifts requires distinguishing whether they result from plastic or genetic changes. Previous studies using collections have documented consistent historical size changes, but the limited studies of other morphological traits have often failed to support, or even test, hypotheses. We explore the...

Data from: Application of benchmark concentration (BMC) analysis on zebrafish data – a new perspective for quantifying toxicity in alternative animal models

Jui-Hua Hsieh, Kristen Ryan, Alexander Sedykh, Ja-An Lin, Andrew J. Shapiro, Frederick Parham & Mamta Behl
Over the past decade, the zebrafish is increasingly being used as a model to screen for chemical-mediated toxicities including developmental toxicity (DT) and neurotoxicity (NT). One of the major challenges is lack of harmonization in data analysis approaches, thereby posing difficulty in comparing findings across laboratories. To address this, we sought to establish a unified data analysis strategy for both DT and NT data, by adopting the benchmark concentration (BMC) analysis. There are two critical...

Data from: Variation across mitochondrial gene trees provides evidence for systematic error: how much gene tree variation is biological?

Emilie J. Richards, Jeremy M. Brown, Anthony J. Barley, Rebecca A. Chong & Robert C. Thomson
The use of large genomic datasets in phylogenetics has highlighted extensive topological variation across genes. Much of this discordance is assumed to result from biological processes. However, variation among gene trees can also be a consequence of systematic error driven by poor model fit, and the relative importance of biological versus methodological factors in explaining gene tree variation is a major unresolved question. Using mitochondrial genomes to control for biological causes of gene tree variation,...

Data from: Direct detection of male quality can facilitate the evolution of female choosiness and indicators of good genes: evolution across a continuum of indicator mechanisms

Sumit Dhole, Caitlin A. Stern & Maria R. Servedio
The evolution of mating displays as indicators of male quality has been the subject of extensive theoretical and empirical research for over four decades. Research has also addressed the evolution of female mate choice favoring such indicators. Yet, much debate still exists about whether displays can evolve through the indirect benefits of female mate choice. Here, we use a population genetic model to investigate how the extent to which females can directly detect male quality...

Data from: Gene exchange between two divergent species of the fungal human pathogen, Coccidioides

Colin Scott Maxwell, Kathleen Mattox, David A. Turissini, Marcus M. Teixeira, Bridget M. Barker & Daniel Ricardo Matute
The fungal genus Coccidioides is composed of two species, Coccidioides immitis and C. posadasii. These two species are the causal agents of coccidioidomycosis, a pulmonary disease also known as valley fever. The two species are thought to have shared genetic material due to gene exchange in spite of their long divergence. To quantify the magnitude of shared ancestry between them, we analyzed the genomes of a population sample from each species. Next, we inferred what...

Data from: The behavioral origins of novelty: did increased aggression lead to scale-eating in pupfishes?

Michelle E. St. John, Joseph A. McGirr & Christopher H. Martin
Behavioral changes in a new environment are often assumed to precede the origins of evolutionary novelties. Here, we examined whether an increase in aggression is associated with a novel scale-eating trophic niche within a recent radiation of Cyprinodon pupfishes endemic to San Salvador Island, Bahamas. We measured aggression using multiple behavioral assays and used transcriptomic analyses to identify differentially expressed genes in aggression and other behavioral pathways across three sympatric species in the San Salvador...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    39

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    39

Affiliations

  • University of North Carolina
    39
  • Duke University
    5
  • Oregon State University
    3
  • North Carolina State University
    3
  • University of Montana
    2
  • University of Washington
    2
  • Sandia National Laboratories
    2
  • Carnegie Mellon University
    2
  • Howard Hughes Medical Institute
    1
  • Reed College
    1