6 Works

Data from: A comprehensive large-scale assessment of fisheries bycatch risk to threatened seabird populations

Thomas A. Clay, Cleo Small, Geoffrey N. Tuck, Deborah Pardo, Ana P.B. Carneiro, Andrew G. Wood, John P. Croxall, Glenn T. Crossin & Richard A. Phillips
1. Incidental mortality (bycatch) in fisheries remains the greatest threat to many large marine vertebrates and is a major barrier to fisheries sustainability. Robust assessments of bycatch risk are crucial for informing effective mitigation strategies, but are hampered by missing information on the distributions of key life-history stages (adult breeders and non-breeders, immatures and juveniles). 2. Using a uniquely comprehensive biologging dataset (1697 tracks, 790 individuals), we assessed spatial overlap of four threatened seabird populations...

A framework for mapping the distribution of seabirds by integrating tracking, demography and phenology

Ana P. B. Carneiro, Elizabeth J. Pearmain, Steffen Oppel, Thomas A. Clay, Richard A. Phillips, Anne-Sophie Bonnet-Lebrun, Ross M. Wanless, Edward Abraham, Yvan Richard, Joel Rice, Jonathan Handley, Tammy E. Davies, Ben J. Dilley, Peter G. Ryan, Cleo Small, Javier Arata, John P. Y. Arnould, Elizabeth Bell, Leandro Bugoni, Letizia Campioni, Paulo Catry, Jaimie Cleeland, Lorna Deppe, Graeme Elliott, Amanda Freeman … & Maria P. Dias
1. The identification of geographic areas where the densities of animals are highest across their annual cycles is a crucial step in conservation planning. In marine environments, however, it can be particularly difficult to map the distribution of species, and the methods used are usually biased towards adults, neglecting the distribution of other life-history stages even though they can represent a substantial proportion of the total population. 2. Here we develop a methodological framework for...

Data from: Are agri-environment schemes successful in delivering conservation grazing management on saltmarsh?

Lucy R. Mason, Alastair Feather, Nick Godden, Chris C. Vreugdenhil & Jennifer Smart
1.Grasslands occur around the globe and, in temperate regions, their natural management by fire, drought and wild herbivores has largely been replaced by grazing with domestic livestock. Successful management for agriculture is not always suitable for conservation and can have a detrimental effect on biodiversity. Conservation grazing of saltmarshes, delivered through agri‐environment schemes, may provide a solution to counteract biodiversity loss by providing farmers with financial incentives to graze these internationally important coastal wetlands more...

Data from: Environmental heterogeneity decreases reproductive success via effects on foraging behaviour

Alice Trevail, Jonathan Green, Jonathan Sharples, Jeff Polton, Peter Miller, Francis Daunt, Ellie Owen, Mark Bolton, Kendrew Colhoun, Stephen Newton, Gail Robertson & Samantha Patrick
Environmental heterogeneity shapes the uneven distribution of resources available to foragers, and is ubiquitous in nature. Optimal foraging theory predicts that an animal’s ability to exploit resource patches is key to foraging success. However, the potential fitness costs and benefits of foraging in a heterogeneous environment are difficult to measure empirically. Heterogeneity may provide higher quality foraging opportunities, or alternatively could increase the cost of resource acquisition because of reduced patch density or increased competition....

Data from: The consequences of land sparing for birds in the United Kingdom

Anthony Lamb, Tom Finch, James W. Pearce-Higgins, Malcolm Ausden, Andrew Balmford, Claire Feniuk, Graham Hirons, Dario Massimino & Rhys E. Green
1. Land sparing has been proposed as a strategy to reconcile biodiversity conservation with agricultural production, with empirical studies on five continents indicating that most species would benefit if food demand was met through high-yield farming combined with the protection or restoration of natural habitat. 2. Most such studies come from landscapes covered by large areas of natural habitat and without a long history of intense human modification. However, much of Europe, consists of human-dominated...

Geolocation and stable isotopes indicate habitat segregation between sexes in Magellanic penguins during the winter dispersion

Melina Barrionuevo, Javier Ciancio, Antje Steinfurth & Esteban Frere
The Magellanic penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) is a top predator and a major consumer of marine resources in the Patagonian Continental Shelf and worldwide. It is the most highly migratory of the Spheniscus penguins, but until recently, its migration route was only partially known. Regarding Magellanic penguins breeding on Isla Quiroga, in Argentina, our goals were: (1) to compare distribution during winter period between sexes and (2) if habitat is found to be segregated, to evaluate...

Registration Year

  • 2019
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    6

Affiliations

  • Royal Society for the Protection of Birds
    6
  • University of Liverpool
    3
  • National Oceanography Centre
    1
  • Centre d'Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Evolutive
    1
  • Centre for Ecology and Hydrology
    1
  • Centre d'Etudes Biologiques de Chizé
    1
  • Oregon State University
    1
  • University of Cambridge
    1
  • Instituto Universitário de Ciências Psicológicas, Sociais e da Vida
    1
  • University of Lisbon
    1