7 Works

Data from: Revisiting Fisher: range size drives the correlation between variability and abundance of British bird eggs

Oriol Lapiedra & Trevor D. Price
We evaluate the correlation between intraspecific variation in egg size and population size in breeding British birds. Using information on abundance, range occupancy, migration status and phylogenetic relationships among species, we show that a wider geographical distribution rather than larger population size per se best predicts egg size variability. A similar result applies to wing length variability. Results from a phylogenetic path analysis suggest that geographical variation is the most parsimonious causal explanation for high...

Data from: Insecticides promote viral outbreaks by altering herbivore competition

Huipeng Pan, Evan L. Preisser, Dong Chu, Shaoli Wang, Qingjun Wu, Yves Carrière, Xuguo Zhou & Youjun Zhang
While the management of biological invasions is often characterized by a series of single-species decisions, invasive species exist within larger food webs. These biotic interactions can alter the impact of control/eradication programs and may cause suppression efforts to inadvertently facilitate invasion spread and impact. We document the rapid replacement of the invasive Bemisia MEAM1 cryptic species by the cryptic MED species throughout China, and demonstrate that MED is more tolerant of insecticides and a better...

Data from: Episodic disturbance from boat anchoring is a major contributor to, but does not alter the trajectory of, long-term coral reef decline

Graham E. Forrester, Rebecca L. Flynn, Linda M. Forrester & Lianna L. Jarecki
Isolating the relative effects of episodic disturbances and chronic stressors on long-term community change is challenging. We assessed the impact of an episodic disturbance associated with human visitation (boat anchoring) relative to other drivers of long-term change on coral reefs. A one-time anchoring event at Crab Cove, British Virgin Islands, in 2004 caused rapid losses of coral and reef structural complexity that were equal to the cumulative decline over 23 years observed at an adjacent...

Data from: City slickers: poor performance does not deter Anolis lizards from using artificial substrates in human-modified habitats

Jason J. Kolbe, Andrew C. Battles & Kevin J. Avilés-Rodríguez
1. As animals move through their environments they encounter a variety of substrates, which have important effects on their locomotor performance. Habitat modification can alter the types of substrates available for locomotion. In particular, many types of artificial substrates have been added to urban areas, but effects of these novel surfaces on animal locomotion are little-known. 2. In this study, we assessed locomotor performance of two Anolis lizard species (A. cristatellus and A. stratulus) on...

Data from: Migrating songbirds on stopover prepare for, and recover from, oxidative challenges posed by long-distance flight

Megan M. Skrip, Ulf Bauchinger, Wolfgang Goymann, Leonida Fusani, Massimiliano Cardinale, Rebecca R. Alan & Scott R. McWilliams
Managing oxidative stress is an important physiological function for all aerobic organisms, particularly during periods of prolonged high metabolic activity, such as long-distance migration across ecological barriers. However, no previous study has investigated the oxidative status of birds at different stages of migration and whether that oxidative status depends on the condition of the birds. In this study, we compared (1) energy stores and circulating oxidative status measures in (a) two species of Neotropical migrants...

Data from: Experimental evolution: assortative mating and sexual selection, independent of local adaptation, lead to reproductive isolation in the nematode Caenorhabditis remanei

Dean M. Castillo, Melissa K. Burger, Curtis M. Lively & Lynda F. Delph
Using experimental evolution, we investigated the contributions of ecological divergence, sexual selection, and genetic drift to the evolution of reproductive isolation in Caenorhabditis remanei. The nematodes were reared on two different environments for 100 generations. They were assayed for fitness on both environments after 30, 64, and 100 generations, and hybrid fitnesses were analyzed after 64 and 100 generations. Mating propensity within and between populations was also analyzed. The design allowed us to determine whether...

Data from: Predation risk perception, food density and conspecific cues shape foraging decisions in a tropical lizard

Maximilian Drakeley, Oriol Lapiedra & Jason J. Kolbe
When foraging, animals can maximize their fitness if they are able to tailor their foraging decisions to current environmental conditions. When making foraging decisions, individuals need to assess the benefits of foraging while accounting for the potential risks of being captured by a predator. However, whether and how different factors interact to shape these decisions is not yet well understood, especially in individual foragers. Here we present a standardized set of manipulative field experiments in...

Registration Year

  • 2015
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  • University of Rhode Island
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  • University of Chicago
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  • University of Manchester
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  • University of Kentucky
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  • Indiana University Bloomington
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  • Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences
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  • Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences
    1
  • Jagiellonian University
    1
  • University of Arizona
    1
  • University of Ferrara
    1