51 Works

Data from: Environmental DNA from seawater samples correlate with trawl catches of subarctic, deepwater fishes

Philip Francis Thomsen, Peter Rask Møller, Eva Egelyng Sigsgaard, Steen Wilhelm Knudsen, Ole Ankjær Jørgensen & Eske Willerslev
Remote polar and deepwater fish faunas are under pressure from ongoing climate change and increasing fishing effort. However, these fish communities are difficult to monitor for logistic and financial reasons. Currently, monitoring of marine fishes largely relies on invasive techniques such as bottom trawling, and on official reporting of global catches, which can be unreliable. Thus, there is need for alternative and non-invasive techniques for qualitative and quantitative oceanic fish surveys. Here we report environmental...

Data from: Odd-paired controls frequency doubling in Drosophila segmentation by altering the pair-rule gene regulatory network

Erik Clark & Michael Akam
The Drosophila embryo transiently exhibits a double segment periodicity, defined by the expression of seven "pair-rule" genes, each in a pattern of seven stripes. At gastrulation, interactions between the pair-rule genes lead to frequency doubling and the patterning of fourteen parasegment boundaries. In contrast to earlier stages of Drosophila anteroposterior patterning, this transition is not well understood. By carefully analysing the spatiotemporal dynamics of pair-rule gene expression, we demonstrate that frequency-doubling is precipitated by multiple...

Data from: Divergence in brain composition during the early stages of ecological specialization in Heliconius butterflies

Stephen H. Montgomery & Richard M. Merrill
During speciation across ecological gradients diverging populations are exposed to contrasting sensory and spatial information that present new behavioural and perceptive challenges. These challenges may be met by heritable or environmentally-induced changes in brain function which mediate behaviour. However, few studies have investigated patterns of neural divergence at the early stages of speciation, inhibiting our understanding of the relative importance of these processes. Here, we provide a novel case study. The incipient species pair, Heliconius...

Data from: Reciprocal signaling in honeyguide-human mutualism

Claire N. Spottiswoode, Keith S. Begg & Colleen M. Begg
Greater honeyguides (Indicator indicator) lead human honey-hunters to wild bees’ nests, in a rare example of a mutualistic foraging partnership between humans and free-living wild animals. We show experimentally that a specialized vocal sound made by Mozambican honey-hunters seeking bees’ nests elicits elevated cooperative behavior from honeyguides. The production of this sound increased the probability of being guided by a honeyguide from about 33 to 66% and the overall probability of thus finding a bees’...

Data from: Variation in growth of Damaraland mole-rats is explained by competition rather than by functional specialization for different tasks

Markus Zöttl, Jack Thorley, David Gaynor, Nigel C. Bennett & Tim Clutton-Brock
In some eusocial insect societies, adaptation to the division of labour results in multimodal size variation among workers. It has been suggested that variation in size and growth among non-breeders in naked and Damaraland mole-rats may similarly reflect functional divergence associated with different cooperative tasks. However, it is unclear whether individual growth rates are multimodally distributed (as would be expected if variation in growth is associated with specialization for different tasks) or whether variation in...

Coastal Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (CBESS) projected area of vegetation in saltmarsh habitats

B.R. Evans, I. Möller & T. Spencer
The dataset contains estimates of the projected area of vegetation derived from the analysis of side-on photographs through the vegetation canopy and recorded for survey quadrats at six UK saltmarsh sites. Three of the sites were in Morecambe Bay, North West England and three of the sites were in Essex, South East England, each of these sites consisted of a saltmarsh area and adjacent mudflat area. Each site comprised 22 quadrats in the vegetated area...

Coastal Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (CBESS) global positioning system (GPS) locations of survey quadrats in saltmarsh and mudflat habitats

B.R. Evans, T. Spencer & I. Möller
The dataset details global positioning system (GPS) locations recorded for survey quadrats at six UK saltmarsh sites. Three of the sites were in Morecambe Bay, North West England and three of the sites were in Essex, South East England, each of these sites consisted of a salt marsh area and adjacent mudflat area. Each site comprised 22 quadrats on the unvegetated mudflat and 22 quadrats on the salt marsh. The locations indicated by this dataset...

Coastal Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (CBESS) global positioning system (GPS) locations for instruments and features associated with wave monitoring and sedimentation-erosion table installations in saltmarsh and mudflat habitats

B.R. Evans, I. Möller & T. Spencer
The dataset details global positioning system (GPS) locations recorded for instruments and locations of interest associated with equipment installed for the monitoring of wave energy, surface elevation changes and sedimentation at five UK saltmarsh sites. Two of the sites were in Morecambe Bay, North West England and three of the sites were in Essex, South East England, each of these sites consisted of a salt marsh area and adjacent mudflat area. Rod Sedimentation-Erosion Tables (rSETs)...

Data from: The comparative landscape of duplications in Heliconius melpomene and Heliconius cydno

Ana Pinharanda, Simon H. Martin, Sarah L. Barker, John W. Davey & Chris D. Jiggins
Gene duplications can facilitate adaptation and may lead to inter-population divergence, causing reproductive isolation. We used whole-genome re-sequencing data from 34 butterflies to detect duplications in two Heliconius species, H. cydno and H. melpomene. Taking advantage of three distinctive signals of duplication in short-read sequencing data, we identified 744 duplicated loci in H. cydno and H. melpomene, 96% of which were validated with single molecule sequencing. We have found that duplications overlap genes significantly less...

Data from: Relative advantages of dichromatic and trichromatic color vision in camouflage breaking

Jolyon Troscianko, Jared Wilson-Aggarwal, David Griffiths, Claire N. Spottiswoode & Martin Stevens
There is huge diversity in visual systems and color discrimination abilities, thought to stem from an animal’s ecology and life history. Many primate species maintain a polymorphism in color vision, whereby most individuals are dichromats but some females are trichromats, implying that selection sometimes favors dichromatic vision. Detecting camouflaged prey is thought to be a task where dichromatic individuals could have an advantage. However, previous work either has not been able to disentangle camouflage detection...

Data from: Biomechanics of shear-sensitive adhesion in climbing animals: peeling, pre-tension and sliding-induced changes in interface strength

David Labonte & Walter Federle
Many arthropods and small vertebrates use adhesive pads for climbing. These biological adhesives have to meet conflicting demands: attachment must be strong and reliable, yet detachment should be fast and effortless. Climbing animals can rapidly and reversibly control their pads' adhesive strength by shear forces, but the mechanisms underlying this coupling have remained unclear. Here, we show that adhesive forces of stick insect pads closely followed the predictions from tape peeling models when shear forces...

Data from: Requirements and limits of anatomy-based predictions of locomotion in terrestrial arthropods with emphasis on arachnids

Tom Weihmann, Hanns Hagen Goetzke & Michael Günther
Modern computer-aided techniques foster the availability and quality of 3D visualization and reconstruction of extinct and extant species. Moreover, animated sequences of locomotion and other movements find their way into motion pictures and documentary films, but also gain attraction in science. While movement analysis is well advanced in vertebrates, particularly in mammals and birds, analyses in arthropods, with their much higher variability regarding general anatomy and size, are still in their infancies and restricted to...

Data from: Allatostatin A signalling in Drosophila regulates feeding and sleep and is modulated by PDF

Jiangtian Chen, Wencke Reiher, Christiane Hermann-Luibl, Azza Sellami, Paola Cognigni, Shu Kondo, Charlotte Helfrich-Förster, Jan A. Veenstra & Christian Wegener
Feeding and sleep are fundamental behaviours with significant interconnections and cross-modulations. The circadian system and peptidergic signals are important components of this modulation, but still little is known about the mechanisms and networks by which they interact to regulate feeding and sleep. We show that specific thermogenetic activation of peptidergic Allatostatin A (AstA)-expressing PLP neurons and enteroendocrine cells reduces feeding and promotes sleep in the fruit fly Drosophila. The effects of AstA cell activation are...

Data from: Superior discrimination for hue than for saturation and an explanation in terms of correlated neural noise

Marina V. Danilova & John D. Mollon
The precision of human colour discrimination depends on the region of colour space in which measurements are made and on the direction in which the compared colours—the discriminanda—differ. Working in a MacLeod–Boynton chromaticity diagram scaled so that thresholds at the white point were equal for the two axes, we made measurements at reference points lying on lines that passed at 45° or −45° through the white point. At a given reference chromaticity, we measured thresholds...

Data from: Independent and parallel evolution of new genes by gene duplication in two origins of C4 photosynthesis provides new insight into the mechanism of phloem loading in C4 species

David M. Emms, Sarah Covshoff, Julian M. Hibberd & Steven Kelly
C4 photosynthesis is considered one of the most remarkable examples of evolutionary convergence in eukaryotes. However, it is unknown whether the evolution of C4 photosynthesis required the evolution of new genes. Genome-wide gene-tree species-tree reconciliation of seven monocot species that span two origins of C4 photosynthesis revealed that there was significant parallelism in the duplication and retention of genes coincident with the evolution of C4 photosynthesis in these lineages. Specifically, 21 orthologous genes were duplicated...

Data from: Rapid evolutionary response to a transmissible cancer in Tasmanian devils

Brendan Epstein, Menna Jones, Rodrigo Hamede, Sarah Hendricks, Hamish McCallum, Elizabeth P. Murchison, Barbara Schönfeld, Cody Wiench, Paul Hohenlohe & Andrew Storfer
Although cancer rarely acts as an infectious disease, a recently emerged transmissible cancer in Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) is virtually 100% fatal. Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) has swept across nearly the entire species’ range, resulting in localized declines exceeding 90% and an overall species decline of more than 80% in less than 20 years. Despite epidemiological models that predict extinction, populations in long-diseased sites persist. Here we report rare genomic evidence of a rapid,...

Data from: The stable isotope ecology of mycalesine butterflies: implications for plant-insect co-evolution

Erik Van Bergen, Henry S. Barlow, Oskar Brattström, Howard Griffiths, Ullasa Kodandaramaiah, Colin P. Osborne & Paul M. Brakefield
One of the most dramatic examples of biome shifts in the geological record is the rapid replacement of C3 vegetation by C4 grasses in (sub-) tropical regions during the Late Miocene–Pliocene. Climate-driven biome shifts of this magnitude are expected to have a major impact on diversification and ecological speciation, especially in grazing taxa. Mycalesine butterflies are excellent candidates to explore the evolutionary impact of these C3/C4 shifts on insect grazer communities. Mycalesine butterflies feed on...

Data from: Tree-centric mapping of forest carbon density from airborne laser scanning and hyperspectral data

Michele Dalponte & David A. Coomes
Forests are a major component of the global carbon cycle, and accurate estimation of forest carbon stocks and fluxes is important in the context of anthropogenic global change. Airborne laser scanning (ALS) data sets are increasingly recognized as outstanding data sources for high-fidelity mapping of carbon stocks at regional scales. We develop a tree-centric approach to carbon mapping, based on identifying individual tree crowns (ITCs) and species from airborne remote sensing data, from which individual...

Data from: Sharp acoustic boundaries across an altitudinal avian hybrid zone despite asymmetric introgression

Wouter Halfwerk, Caroline Dingle, Dusan M. Brinkhuizen, Jelmer W. Poelstra, Jan Komdeur & Hans Slabbekoorn
Birdsong is a sexually selected trait that could play an important evolutionary role when related taxa come into secondary contact. Many songbird species however learn their songs through copying one or more tutors, which complicates the evolutionary outcome of such contact. Two subspecies of a presumed vocal learner, the grey-breasted wood-wren (Henicorhina leucophrys), replace each other altitudinally across the western slope of the Ecuadorian Andes. These subspecies are morphologically very similar, but show striking differences...

Data from: 1970s and ‘Patient 0’ HIV-1 genomes illuminate early HIV/AIDS history in North America

Michael Worobey, Thomas D. Watts, Richard A. McKay, Marc A. Suchard, Timothy Granade, Dirk E. Teuwen, Beryl A. Koblin, Walid Heneine, Philippe Lemey & Harold W. Jaffe
The emergence of HIV-1 group M subtype B in North American men who have sex with men was a key turning point in the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Phylogenetic studies have suggested cryptic subtype B circulation in the United States (US) throughout the 1970s1, 2 and an even older presence in the Caribbean2. However, these temporal and geographical inferences, based upon partial HIV-1 genomes that postdate the recognition of AIDS in 1981, remain contentious3, 4 and the...

Coastal Biodiversity and Ecosystem Service Sustainability (CBESS) wave monitoring over saltmarsh and mudflat habitats

I. Möller, B.R. Evans & T. Spencer
The dataset details derived wave parameters from bottom-mounted pressure monitoring installations across five UK salt marshes. Two of the sites were in Morecambe Bay, North West England and three of the sites were in Essex, South East England, each of these sites consisted of a saltmarsh area and adjacent mudflat area. The sensors were deployed in transects oriented approximately shore-normal and straddling the vegetated-unvegetated margin. This data was collected as part of Coastal Biodiversity and...

Data from: Female preference functions drive interpopulation divergence in male signalling: call diversity in the bushcricket Ephippiger diurnus

Flavia Barbosa, Darren Rebar & Michael D. Greenfield
Female preferences play a major role in the elaboration and diversification of male traits: as a selective pressure on males, variation in female preferences can generate population divergence and ultimately, speciation. We studied how interpopulation differences in the shape of female mate preference functions may have shaped male advertisement signals in the bushcricket Ephippiger diurnus. This species is distributed as geographically isolated populations with striking interpopulation variation in male acoustic signals, most notably in the...

Data from: A rare study from the wintering grounds provides insight into the costs of malaria infection for migratory birds

Marjorie C. Sorensen, Muhammad Asghar, Staffan Bensch, Graham D. Fairhurst, Susanne Jenni-Eiermann & Claire N. Spottiswoode
Malaria parasites can have strong effects on the population dynamics and evolution of migratory bird species. In many species, parasite transmission occurs on the wintering grounds, but studies to determine the consequences of infection have taken place during the breeding season, when malaria parasites circulate at chronic levels. We examined the predictors of malarial infections for great reed warblers during the northern winter in Africa, where active parasite transmission is thought to occur and naïve...

Data from: A gene associated with social immunity in the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides

William Palmer, Ana Duarte, Matthew Schrader, Jonathan Day, Rebecca Kilner, Francis Jiggins, Jonathan P. Day, Francis M. Jiggins & William J. Palmer
Some group-living species exhibit social immunity, where the immune response of one individual can protect others in the group from infection. In burying beetles this is part of parental care. Larvae feed on vertebrate carcasses which their parents smear with exudates that inhibit microbial growth. We have sequenced the transcriptome of the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides and identified six genes that encode lysozymes – a type of antimicrobial enzyme that has previously been implicated in...

Data from: Relative costs of offspring sex and offspring survival in a polygynous mammal

Hannah Froy, Craig A. Walling, Josephine M. Pemberton, Tim H. Clutton-Brock, Loeske E.B. Kruuk & Loeske E. B. Kruuk
Costs of reproduction are expected to be ubiquitous in wild animal populations and understanding the drivers of variation in these costs is an important aspect of life-history evolution theory. We use a 43 year dataset from a wild population of red deer to examine the relative importance of two factors that influence the costs of reproduction to mothers, and to test whether these costs vary with changing ecological conditions. Like previous studies, our analyses indicate...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    51

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    51

Affiliations

  • University of Cambridge
    51
  • University of Edinburgh
    4
  • Wellcome Trust
    4
  • Ghent University
    2
  • University of Pretoria
    2
  • Duke University
    2
  • Australian National University
    2
  • University of Warwick
    2
  • University of Tasmania
    2
  • University of Zurich
    2