64 Works

Data from: The Gambian epauletted fruit bat shows increased genetic divergence in the Ethiopian highlands and in an area of rapid urbanisation

Silke A. Riesle-Sbarbaro, Kofi Amponsah-Mensah, Stefan De Vries, Violaine Nicolas, Aude Lalis, Richard Suu-Ire, Andrew A. Cunningham, James L.N. Wood, David R. Sargan & James L. N. Wood
The Gambian epauletted fruit bat (Epomophorus gambianus) is an abundant species that roosts in both urban and rural settings. The possible role of E. gambianus as a reservoir host of zoonotic diseases underlines the need to better understand the species movement patterns. So far, neither observational nor phylogenetic studies have identified the dispersal range or behaviour of this species. Comparative analyses of mitochondrial and nuclear markers from 20 localities across the known distribution of E....

Data from: Larger fragments have more late-successional species of woody plants than smaller fragments after 50 years of secondary succession

Jiajia Liu, David Coomes, Guang Hu, Jinliang Liu, Jingjing Yu, Yangqing Luo, Mingjian Yu & David A. Coomes
1. Most fragmentation research focuses on the effects of carving up old-growth forests, but less is known about influences of habitat fragmentation on secondary succession in patches of regenerating forests. 2. Working with forest dynamics on islands in a vast lake created by a hydroelectric dam in China (the Thousand Island Lake), we sampled 29 islands that were cleared of forest during dam construction in 1959 and then underwent succession. Measurements taken in 2009-2010 and...

Data from: Predation risk shaped by habitat and landscape complexity in urban environments

David Frey, Kevin Vega, Florian Zellweger, Jaboury Ghazoul, Dennis Hansen & Marco Moretti
1. Habitat loss and modification are hallmarks of anthropogenic ecosystems, but the consequences for ecosystem functions and services often remain unclear. Understanding these links in cities is complicated by strong but fine-scale differences in habitat structure among green space patches, and a high variance in habitat amount across urban landscapes. 2. We used airborne laser scanning (ALS) data to disentangle the effects of 3D woody habitat heterogeneity of urban home gardens, and woody habitat amount...

Data from: Detailed insights into pan-European population structure and inbreeding in wild and hatchery Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) populations revealed by genome-wide SNP data

David L.J. Vendrami, Ross D. Houston, Karim Gharbi, Luca Telesca, Alejandro P. Gutierrez, Helen Gurney-Smith, Natsuki Hasegawa, Pierre Boudry, Joseph I. Hoffman & David L. J. Vendrami
Cultivated bivalves are hugely important not only because of their economic value, but also due to their impacts on natural ecosystems. The Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) is the world's most heavily cultivated shellfish species and has been introduced to all continents except Antarctica for aquaculture. We therefore used a medium density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array to investigate the genetic structure of this species in Europe, where it was introduced during the 1960s and has...

Data from: Long-term declines in winter body mass of tits throughout Britain and Ireland correlate with climate change

Euan N. Furness & Robert A. Robinson
1. The optimum body mass of passerine birds typically represents a trade-off between starvation risk, which promotes fat gain, and predation pressure, which promotes fat loss to maintain manoeuvrability. Changes in ecological factors that affect either of these variables will therefore change the optimum body masses of populations of passerine birds. 2. This study sought to identify and quantify the effects of changing temperatures and predation pressures on the body masses and wing lengths of...

Data from: Anatomy of the Ediacaran rangeomorph Charnia masoni

Frances S. Dunn, Philip R. Wilby, Charlotte G. Kenchington, Dmitry V. Grazhdankin, Philip C. J. Donoghue, Alexander G. Liu & Dmitriy V. Grazhdankin
The Ediacaran macrofossil Charnia masoni Ford is perhaps the most iconic member of the Rangeomorpha: a group of seemingly sessile, frondose organisms that dominates late Ediacaran benthic, deep‐marine fossil assemblages. Despite C. masoni exhibiting broad palaeogeographical and stratigraphical ranges, there have been few morphological studies that consider the variation observed among populations of specimens derived from multiple global localities. We present an analysis of C. masoni that evaluates specimens from the UK, Canada and Russia,...

Data from: Diagnostic pathways and direct medical costs incurred by new adult pulmonary tuberculosis patients prior to anti-tuberculosis treatment – Tamil Nadu, India

Karun Sandeep Veesa, Kamalabhai Russell John, Patrick K. Moonan, Saravanakumar Puthupalayam Kaliappan, Krishna Manjunath, Karuna D. Sagili, Chinnappareddy Ravichandra, Pradeep Aravindan Menon, Chandrakumar Dolla, Nancy Luke, Kaivan Munshi, Kuryan George & Shantidani Minz
Background: Tuberculosis (TB) patients face substantial delays prior to treatment initiation, and out of pocket (OOP) expenditures often surpass the economic productivity of the household. We evaluated the pre-diagnostic cost and health seeking behaviour of new adult pulmonary TB patients registered at Primary Health Centres (PHCs) in Vellore district, Tamil Nadu, India. Methods: This descriptive study, part of a randomised controlled trial conducted in three rural Tuberculosis Units from Dec 2012 to Dec 2015, collected...

Data from: Growth affects dispersal success in social mole-rats, but not the duration of philopatry

Miquel Torrents Ticó, Nigel C. Bennett, Jennifer U.M Jarvis & Markus Zoettl
In naked mole-rats (Heterocephalus glaber), some non-breeding males show faster growth and are more likely to disperse than others. These differences have been suggested to be the result of a specialized developmental strategy leading to shorter philopatry and independent breeding, as opposed to extended philopatry as non-reproductive helpers. However, it is unclear whether fast-growing males disperse sooner than slow-growing males. An alternative explanation is that variation in quality between individuals causes high-quality individuals to grow...

Data from: Sexual conflict in action: an antagonistic relationship between maternal and paternal sex allocation in the tammar wallaby, Notamacropus eugenii

Amy M. Edwards, Elissa Z. Cameron, Janine E. Deakin, Tariq Ezaz, Jorge C. Pereira, Malcolm A. Ferguson-Smith & Kylie A. Robert
Sex ratio biases are often inconsistent, both among and within species and populations. While some of these inconsistencies may be due to experimental design, much of the variation remains inexplicable. Recent research suggests that an exclusive focus on mothers may account for some of the inconsistency, with an increasing number of studies showing variation in sperm sex ratios and seminal fluids. Using fluorescent in-situ hybridization we show a significant population level Y-chromosome bias in the...

Data from: Parental care and sibling competition independently increase phenotypic variation among burying beetle siblings

Matthew Schrader, Benjamin J.M. Jarrett, Rebecca M. Kilner & Benjamin J. M. Jarrett
Several recent hypotheses suggest that parental care can influence the extent of phenotypic variation within populations; however, there have been few tests of these ideas. We exploited the facultative nature of post-hatching parental care in the burying beetle, Nicrophorus vespilloides, to test whether parental care influences the expression of phenotypic variation in an important fitness trait (body size). We found that parental care and brood size (which influences sibling competition) had positive and independent effects...

Data from: Genome-wide analyses of the Bemisia tabaci species complex reveal contrasting patterns of admixture and complex demographic histories

Samia Elfekih, Paul Etter, Weetek T. Tay, Matteo Fumagalli, Karl Gordon, Eric Johnson & Paul De Barro
Once considered a single species, the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, is a complex of numerous morphologically indistinguishable species. Within the last three decades, two of its members (MED and MEAM1) have become some of the world's most damaging agricultural pests invading countries across Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas and affecting a vast range of agriculturally important food and fiber crops through both feeding-related damage and the transmission of numerous plant viruses. For some time now,...

Data from: Interception by two predatory fly species is explained by a proportional navigation feedback controller

Samuel T. Fabian, Mary E. Sumner, Trevor J. Wardill, Sergio Rossoni & Paloma T. Gonzalez-Bellido
When aiming to capture a fast-moving target, animals can follow it until they catch up, or try to intercept it. In principle, interception is the more complicated strategy, but also more energy efficient. To study whether simple feedback controllers can explain interception behaviours by animals with miniature brains, we have reconstructed and studied the predatory flights of the robber fly Holcocephala fusca and killer fly Coenosia attenuata. Although both species catch other aerial arthropods out...

Data from: Evolution at two time frames: polymorphisms from an ancient singular divergence event fuel contemporary parallel evolution

Steven M. Van Belleghem, Carl Vangestel, Katrien De Wolf, Zoë De Corte, Markus Möst, Pasi Rastas, Luc De Meester & Frederik Hendrickx
When environments change, populations may adapt surprisingly fast, repeatedly and even at microgeographic scales. There is increasing evidence that such cases of rapid parallel evolution are fueled by standing genetic variation, but the source of this genetic variation remains poorly understood. In the saltmarsh beetle Pogonus chalceus, short-winged ‘tidal’ and long-winged ‘seasonal’ ecotypes have diverged in response to contrasting hydrological regimes and can be repeatedly found along the Atlantic European coast. By analyzing genomic variation...

Data from: Debugging diversity – a pan‐continental exploration of the potential of terrestrial blood‐feeding leeches as a vertebrate monitoring tool

Ida Bærholm Schnell, Kristine Bohmann, Sebastian E. Schultze, Stine R. Richter, Dáithí C. Murray, Mikkel-Holger S. Sinding, David Bass, John E. Cadle, Mason J. Campbell, Rainer Dulch, David P. Edwards, Thomas N. E. Gray, Teis Hansen, Anh N. Q. Hoa, Christina Lehmkuhl Noer, Sigrid Heise-Pavlov, Adam F. Sander Pedersen, Juliot C. Ramamonjisoa, Mark E. Siddall, Andrew Tilker, Carl Traeholt, Nicholas Wilkinson, Paul Woodcock, Douglas W. Yu, Mads Frost Bertelsen … & Ida Baerholm Schnell
The use of environmental DNA (eDNA) has become an applicable non-invasive tool with which to obtain information about biodiversity. A sub-discipline of eDNA is iDNA (invertebrate-derived DNA), where genetic material ingested by invertebrates is used to characterise the biodiversity of the species that served as hosts. While promising, these techniques are still in their infancy, as they have only been explored on limited numbers of samples from only a single or a few different locations....

Data from: Systemic neurotransmitter responses to clinically approved and experimental neuropsychiatric drugs

Hamid R. Noori, Lewis H. Mervin, Vahid Bokharaie, Özlem Durmus, Lisamon Egenrieder, Stefan Fritze, Britta Gruhlke, Guilia Reinhardt, Hans-Hendrik Schabel, Sabine Staudenmaier, Nikos K. Logothetis, Andreas Bender & Rainer Spanagel
Neuropsychiatric disorders are the third leading cause of global disease burden. Current pharmacological treatment for these disorders is inadequate, with often insufficient efficacy and undesirable side effects. One reason for this is that the links between molecular drug action and neurobehavioral drug effects are elusive. We use a big data approach from the neurotransmitter response patterns of 258 different neuropsychiatric drugs in rats to address this question. Data from experiments comprising 110,674 rats are presented...

Data from: Old-growth forests buffer climate-sensitive bird populations from warming

Matthew G. Betts, Ben Phalan, Sarah J. K. Frey, Josée S. Rousseau & Zhiqiang Yang
Aim: Habitat loss and climate change constitute two of the greatest threats to biodiversity worldwide, and theory predicts that these factors may act synergistically to affect population trajectories. Recent evidence indicates that structurally complex old-growth forest can be cooler than other forest types during spring and summer months, thereby offering potential to buffer populations from negative effects of warming. Old growth may also have higher food and nest-site availability for certain species, which could have...

Data from: The evolutionary history of dogs in the Americas

Máire Ní Leathlobhair, Angela R. Perri, Evan K. Irving-Pease, Kelsey E. Witt, Anna Linderholm, James Haile, Ophelie Lebrasseur, Carly Ameen, Jeffrey Blick, Adam R. Boyko, Selina Brace, Yahaira Nunes Cortes, Susan J. Crockford, Alison Devault, Evangelos A. Dimopoulos, Morley Eldridge, Jacob Enk, Shyam Gopalakrishnan, Kevin Gori, Vaughan Grimes, Eric Guiry, Anders J. Hansen, Ardern Hulme-Beaman, John Johnson, Andrew Kitchen … & Laurent A. F. Frantz
Dogs were present in the Americas prior to the arrival of European colonists, but the origin and fate of these pre-contact dogs are largely unknown. We sequenced 71 mitochondrial and seven nuclear genomes from ancient North American and Siberian dogs spanning ~9,000 years. Our analysis indicates that American dogs were not domesticated from North American wolves. Instead, American dogs form a monophyletic lineage that likely originated in Siberia and dispersed into the Americas alongside people....

Data from: Development of G: a test in an amphibious fish

Joseph M. Styga, Thomas M. Houslay, Alastair J. Wilson & Ryan L. Earley
Heritable variation in, and genetic correlations among, traits determine the response of multivariate phenotypes to natural selection. However, as traits develop over ontogeny, patterns of genetic (co)variation and integration captured by the G matrix may also change. Despite this, few studies have investigated how genetic parameters underpinning multivariate phenotypes change as animals pass through major life history stages. Here, using a self-fertilizing hermaphroditic fish species, mangrove rivulus (Kryptolebias marmoratus), we test the hypothesis that G...

Data from: Litter removal in a tropical rain forest reduces fine root biomass and production but litter addition has few effects

Chadtip Rodtassana, Edmund V.J. Tanner & E. V. J. Tanner
Many old-growth lowland tropical rain forests are potentially nutrient limited, and it has long been thought that many such forests maintain growth by recycling nutrients from decomposing litter. We investigated this by continuously removing (for ten years) freshly fallen litter from five (45 m x 45 m) plots, adding it to five other plots, there were five controls. From monthly measures over one year we show that litter removal caused lower: fine root (≤2 mm...

Data from: Ant mosaics in Bornean primary rain forest high canopy depend on spatial scale, time of day, and sampling method

Kalsum M. Yusah, William A. Foster, Glen Reynolds & Tom M. Fayle
Background: Competitive interactions in biological communities can be thought of as giving rise to “assembly rules” that dictate the species that are able to co-exist. Ant communities in tropical canopies often display a particular pattern, an “ant mosaic”, in which competition between dominant ant species results in a patchwork of mutually exclusive territories. Although ant mosaics have been well-documented in plantation landscapes, their presence in pristine tropical forests remained contentious until recently. Here we assess...

Data from: Horn growth variation and hunting selection of the Alpine ibex

Ulf Büntgen, Juan Diego Galván, Atle Mysterud, Paul J. Krusic, Lisa Hülsmann, Hannes Jenny, Josef Senn & Kurt Bollmann
Selective hunting can affect demographic characteristics and phenotypic traits of the targeted species. Hunting systems often involve harvesting quotas based on sex, age and/or size categories to avoid selective pressure. However, it is difficult to assess whether such regulations deter hunters from targeting larger “trophy” animals with longer horns that may have evolutionary consequences. Here, we compile 44,088 annually resolved and absolutely dated measurements of Alpine ibex (Capra ibex) horn growth increments from 8,355 males,...

Data from: Evolution of longevity improves immunity in Drosophila

Daniel K. Fabian, Kathrin Garschall, Peter Klepsatel, Gonçalo Santos-Matos, Élio Sucena, Martin Kapun, Bruno Lemaitre, Robert Arking, Christian Schloetterer & Thomas Flatt
Much has been learned about the genetics of aging from studies in model organisms, but still little is known about naturally occurring alleles that contribute to variation in longevity. For example, analysis of mutants and transgenes has identified insulin signaling as a major regulator of longevity, yet whether standing variation in this pathway underlies microevolutionary changes in lifespan and correlated fitness traits remains largely unclear. Here we have analyzed the genomes of a set of...

Data from: Vestigial singing behaviour persists after the evolutionary loss of song in crickets

Will T. Schneider, Christian Rutz, Berthold Hedwig & Nathan W. Bailey
The evolutionary loss of sexual traits is widely predicted. Because sexual signals can arise from the coupling of specialised motor activity with morphological structures, disruption to a single component could lead to overall loss of function. Opportunities to observe this process and characterise any remaining signal components are rare, but could provide insight into the mechanisms, indirect costs, and evolutionary consequences of signal loss. We investigated the recent evolutionary loss of a long-range acoustic sexual...

Data from: Opposing patterns of intraspecific and interspecific differentiation in sex chromosomes and autosomes

Peter A. Moran, Sonia Pascoal, Timothée Cezard, Judith E. Risse, Michael G. Ritchie & Nathan W. Bailey
Linking intraspecific and interspecific divergence is an important challenge in speciation research. X chromosomes are expected to evolve faster than autosomes and disproportionately contribute to reproductive barriers, and comparing genetic variation on X and autosomal markers within and between species can elucidate evolutionary processes that shape genome variation. We performed RADseq on a 16-population transect of two closely-related Australian cricket species, Teleogryllus commodus and T. oceanicus, covering allopatry and sympatry. This classic study system for...

Data from: Support for a clade of Placozoa and Cnidaria in genes with minimal compositional bias

Christopher E. Laumer, Harald Gruber-Vodicka, Michael G. Hadfield, Vicki B. Pearse, Ana Riesgo, John C. Marioni & Gonzalo Giribet
The phylogenetic placement of the morphologically simple placozoans is crucial to understanding the evolution of complex animal traits. Here, we examine the influence of adding new genomes from placozoans to a large dataset designed to study the deepest splits in the animal phylogeny. Using site-heterogeneous substitution models, we show that it is possible to obtain strong support, in both amino acid and reduced-alphabet matrices, for either a sister-group relationship between Cnidaria and Placozoa, or for...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    64

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    64

Affiliations

  • University of Cambridge
    64
  • University of Copenhagen
    4
  • University of Edinburgh
    3
  • University of East Anglia
    3
  • University of St Andrews
    3
  • University of California Los Angeles
    3
  • University of Lausanne
    2
  • British Antarctic Survey
    2
  • University of Oslo
    2
  • University of Leeds
    2