58 Works

Code lists for: \"Risk of adverse mental health outcomes in women with history of breast cancer: a matched population-based cohort study in the United Kingdom (1988-2018)\"

Helena Carreira & Garth Funston
A set of read codes associated with a paper titled "Risk of adverse mental health outcomes in women with history of breast cancer: a matched population-based cohort study in the United Kingdom (1988-2018)".

Thick adherent diamond films on AlN with low thermal barrier resistance - data

Soumen Mandal, Chao Yuan, Fabien Massabuau, James W Pomeroy, Jerome Cuenca, Henry A Bland, Evan L Thomas, David Wallis, Tim Batten, Rachel Oliver, Martin Kuball & Oliver A Williams
This dataset is the study of thick adherent diamond layers on AlN. The txt files can be opened and analysed using any plotting software. The work describes growth of >100μm thick diamond layer adherent on aluminium nitride. While thick films failed to adhere on untreated AlN films, hydrogen/nitrogen plasma treated AlN films retained the thick diamond layers. Clear differences in zeta potential measurement confirms the surface modification due to hydrogen/nitrogen plasma treatment. Areal Raman maps...

Data from: The yeast mitochondrial pyruvate carrier is a hetero-dimer in its functional state

Sotiria Tavoulari, Chancievan Thangaratnarajah, Vasiliki Mavridou, Michael E. Harbour, Jean-Claude Martinou & Edmund R.S. Kunji
The mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC) is critical for cellular homeostasis, as it is required in central metabolism for transporting pyruvate from the cytosol into the mitochondrial matrix. MPC has been implicated in many diseases and is being investigated as a drug target. A few years ago, small membrane proteins, called MPC1 and MPC2 in mammals and Mpc1, Mpc2 and Mpc3 in yeast, were proposed to form large protein complexes responsible for this function. However, the...

Data from: Conflict within species determines the value of a mutualism between species

Syuan-Jyun Sun, Nicholas P.C. Horrocks & Rebecca M. Kilner
Mutually beneficial interactions between species play a key role in maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function. Nevertheless, such mutualisms can erode into antagonistic interactions. One explanation is that the fitness costs and benefits of interacting with a partner species vary among individuals. However, it is unclear why such variation exists. Here we demonstrate that social behaviour within species plays an important, though hitherto overlooked, role in determining the relative fitness to be gained from interacting with...

Data from: Inbreeding alters context‐dependent reproductive effort and immunity in male crickets

Kristin R. Duffield, Kylie J. Hampton, Thomas M. Houslay, John Hunt, Ben M. Sadd & Scott K. Sakaluk
Infection can cause hosts to drastically alter their investment in key life‐history traits of reproduction and defence. Infected individuals are expected to increase investment in defence (e.g., by increasing immune function) and, due to trade‐offs, investment in other traits (e.g., current reproduction) should decrease. However, the terminal investment hypothesis postulates that decreased lifespan due to infection and the associated reduction in the expectation for future offspring will favour increased investment towards current reproduction. Variation in...

Data from: Virus evolution in Wolbachia-infected Drosophila

Julien Martinez, Gaspar Bruner-Montero, Sophia CL Smith, Jonathan P Day, Ben Longdon, Ramesh Arunkumar & Francis M Jiggins
Wolbachia, a common vertically transmitted symbiont, can protect insects against viral infection and prevent mosquitoes from transmitting viral pathogens. For this reason, Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes are being released to prevent the transmission of dengue and other arboviruses. An important question for the long-term success of these programs is whether viruses can evolve to escape the antiviral effects of Wolbachia. We have found that Wolbachia altered the outcome of competition between strains of the DCV virus in...

Data from: Consistent within‐individual plasticity is sufficient to explain temperature responses in red deer reproductive traits

Hannah Froy, Julien Martin, Katie Stopher, Alison Morris, Sean Morris, Tim Clutton-Brock, Josephine Pemberton & Loeske Kruuk
Warming global temperatures are affecting a range of aspects of wild populations, but the exact mechanisms driving associations between temperature and phenotypic traits may be difficult to identify. Here, we use a 36‐year data set on a wild population of red deer to investigate the causes of associations between temperature and two important components of female reproduction: timing of breeding and offspring size. By separating within‐ versus between‐individual associations with temperature for each trait, we...

Data from: Evolution transforms pushed waves into pulled waves

Philip Erm & Ben Phillips
Understanding the dynamics of biological invasions is crucial for managing numerous phenomena, from invasive species to tumours. While the Allee effect (where individuals in low-density populations suffer lowered fitness) is known to influence both the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of an invasion, the possibility that an invader's susceptibility to the Allee effect might itself evolve has received little attention. Since invasion fronts are regions of perpetually low population density, selection should be expected to favour...

Collective decision-making appears more egalitarian in populations where group fission costs are higher

James Herbert-Read, Amy Wade, Indar Ramnarine & Christos Ioannou
Collective decision-making is predicted to be more egalitarian in conditions where the costs of group fission are higher. Here we ask whether Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata) living in high or low predation environments, and thereby facing differential group fission costs, make collective decisions in line with this prediction. Using a classic decision-making scenario, we found that fish from high predation environments switched their positions within groups more frequently than fish from low predation environments. Because...

Optimal searching behaviour generated intrinsically by the central pattern generator for locomotion

Jimena Berni, David W. Sims & Nicolas E. Humphries
Efficient searching for resources such as food by animals is key to their survival. It has been proposed that diverse animals from insects to sharks and humans adopt searching patterns that resemble a simple Lévy random walk, which is theoretically optimal for ‘blind foragers’ to locate sparse, patchy resources. To test if such patterns are generated intrinsically, or arise via environmental interactions, we tracked free-moving Drosophila larvae with (and without) blocked synaptic activity in the...

Data from: Personal information about danger trumps social information from avian alarm calls

Jessica R. McLachlan, Chaminda P. Ratnayake & Robert D. Magrath
Information about predators can mean the difference between life and death, but prey face the challenge of integrating personal information about predators with social information from the alarm calls of others. This challenge might even affect the structure of interspecific information networks: species vary in response to alarm calls, potentially because different foraging ecologies constrain the acquisition of personal information. However, the hypothesis that constrained personal information explains a greater response to alarm calls has...

Data from: Predators’ consumption of unpalatable prey does not vary as a function of bitter taste perception

Liisa Hämäläinen, Johanna Mappes, Rose Thorogood, Janne Valkonen, Kaijamari Karttunen, Tuuli Salmi & Hannah Rowland
Many prey species contain defensive chemicals that are described as tasting bitter. Bitter taste perception is therefore assumed to be important when predators are learning about prey defenses. However, it is not known how individuals differ in their response to bitter taste, and how this influences their foraging decisions. We conducted taste perception assays in which wild-caught great tits (Parus major) were given water with increasing concentrations of bitter-tasting chloroquine diphosphate until they showed an...

Data from: The development of individual differences in cooperative behaviour: maternal glucocorticoid hormones alter helping behaviour of offspring in wild meerkats

Ben Dantzer, Constance Dubuc, Ines Braga Goncalves, Dominic L. Cram, Nigel C. Bennett, Andre Ganswindt, Michael Heistermann, Chris Duncan, David Gaynor & Tim H. Clutton-Brock
The phenotype of parents can have long-lasting effects on the development of offspring as well as on their behaviour, physiology and morphology as adults. In some cases, these changes may increase offspring fitness but, in others, they can elevate parental fitness at a cost to the fitness of their offspring. We show that in Kalahari meerkats (Suricata suricatta), the circulating glucocorticoid (GC) hormones of pregnant females affect the growth and cooperative behaviour of their offspring....

Autoantibodies against the prion protein in individuals with PRNP mutations

Karl Frontzek, Manfredi Carta, Marco Losa, Mirka Epskamp, Georg Meisl, Alice Anane, Jean-Philippe Brandel, Ulrike Camenisch, Joaquín Castilla, Stéphane Haïk, Tuomas Knowles, Ewald Lindner, Andreas Lutterotti, Eric Vallabh Minikel, Ignazio Roiter, Jiri G. Safar, Raquel Sanchez-Valle, Dana Žáková, Simone Hornemann & Adriano Aguzzi
Objective. To determine whether naturally occurring autoantibodies against the prion protein are present in individuals with genetic prion disease mutations and controls, and if so, whether they are protective against prion disease. Methods. In this case-control study, we collected 124 blood samples from individuals with a variety of pathogenicPRNPmutations and 78 control individuals with a positive family history of genetic prion disease but lacking disease-associatedPRNPmutations. Antibody reactivity was measured using an indirect ELISA for the...

Intergroup aggression in meerkats

Mark Dyble, Thomas Houslay, Marta Manser & Tim Clutton-Brock
Violent conflicts between groups have been observed among many species of group living mammals and can have important fitness consequences, with individuals being injured or killed and with losing groups surrendering territory. Here, we explore between-group conflict among meerkats (Suricata suricatta), a highly social and cooperatively breeding mongoose. We show that interactions between meerkat groups are frequently 18 aggressive and sometimes escalate to fighting and lethal violence and that these interactions have consequences for group...

Repeated sex chromosome evolution in vertebrates supported by expanded avian sex chromosomes

Hanna Sigeman, Bengt Hansson, Suvi Ponnikas, Pallavi Chauhan, Elisa Dierickx & M. De L. Brooke
Sex chromosomes have evolved from the same autosomes multiple times across vertebrates, suggesting that selection for recombination suppression has acted repeatedly and independently on certain genetic backgrounds. Here, we perform comparative genomics of a bird clade (larks and their sister lineage; Alaudidae and Panuridae) where multiple sex chromosome–autosome fusions appear to have formed expanded sex chromosomes. We detected the largest known avian sex chromosome (195.3 Mbp) and show that it originates from fusions between parts...

Effects of climate change on pup growth and survival in a cooperative mammal, the meerkat

Tanja Van De Ven, Andrea Fuller & Tim Clutton-Brock
1. Breeding systems in which group members help to raise the offspring of co-members are associated with arid, unpredictable environments. Cooperative rearing may mitigate the effects of adverse environmental conditions on pup growth and survival. However, few studies have explored the relationship between environmental variation and breeding success, and the role of helpers. 2. Here we show that increases in daily maximum air temperatures (Tmax) in the southern Kalahari over the last twenty years have...

Data from: The ecology and evolution of seed predation by Darwin's finches on Tribulus cistoides on the Galápagos Islands

Sofía Carvajal-Endara, Andrew P. Hendry, Nancy C. Emery, Corey P. Neu, Diego Carmona, Kiyoko M. Gotanda, T. Jonathan Davies, Jaime A. Chaves & Marc T. J Johnson
Predator-prey interactions play a key role in the evolution of species traits through antagonistic coevolutionary arms-races. The evolution of beak morphology in the Darwin’s finches in response to competition for seed resources is a classic example of evolution by natural selection. The seeds of Tribulus cistoides are an important food source for the largest ground finch species (Geospiza fortis, G. magnirostris, and G. conirostris) in dry months, and the hard spiny morphology of the fruits...

Data from: Tracing the rise of malignant cell lines: distribution, epidemiology and evolutionary interactions of two transmissible cancers in Tasmanian devils

Samantha James, Geordie Jennings, Young Mi Kwon, Maximilian Stammnitz, Alexandra Fraik, Andrew Storfer, Sebastien Comte, David Pemberton, Samantha Fox, Bill Brown, Ruth Pye, Gregory Woods, Bruce Lyons, Paul Hohenlohe, Hamish McCallum, Hannah V. Siddle, Frederic Thomas, Beata Ujvari, Elizabeth P. Murchison, Menna Jones & Rodrigo Hamede
Emerging infectious diseases are rising globally and understanding host-pathogen interactions during the initial stages of disease emergence is essential for assessing potential evolutionary dynamics and designing novel management strategies. Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) are endangered due to a transmissible cancer – devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) – that since its emergence in the 1990’s, has affected most populations throughout Tasmania. Recent studies suggest that devils are adapting to the DFTD epidemic and that disease-induced extinction...

Data from: Abundance drives broad patterns of generalisation in plant-hummingbird pollination networks

Benno I. Simmons, Jeferson Vizentin-Bugoni, Pietro K. Maruyama, Peter A. Cotton, Oscar H. Marín-Gómez, Carlos Lara, Liliana Rosero-Lasprilla, María A Maglianesi, Raúl Ortiz-Pulido, Márcia A. Rocca, Licléia C. Rodrigues, Boris Tinocco, Marcelo F. Vasconcelos, Marlies Sazima, Ana M. Martín González, Jesper Sonne, Carsten Rahbek, Lynn V. Dicks, Bo Dalsgaard & William J. Sutherland
Abundant pollinators are often more generalised than rare pollinators. This could be because abundant species have more chance encounters with potential interaction partners. On the other hand, generalised species could have a competitive advantage over specialists, leading to higher abundance. Determining the direction of the abundance-generalisation relationship is therefore a ‘chicken-and-egg’ dilemma. Here we determine the direction of the relationship between abundance and generalisation in plant-hummingbird pollination networks across the Americas. We find evidence that...

Data from: Helping decisions and kin recognition in long-tailed tits: is call similarity used to direct help towards kin?

Amy Leedale, Robert Lachlan, Elva Robinson & Ben Hatchwell
Most cooperative breeders live in discrete family groups, but in a minority, breeding populations comprise extended social networks of conspecifics that vary in relatedness. Selection for effective kin recognition may be expected for individuals in such kin neighbourhoods to maximise indirect fitness. Using a long-term social pedigree, molecular genetics, field observations and acoustic analyses, we examine how vocal similarity affects helping decisions in the long-tailed tit Aegithalos caudatus. Long-tailed tits are cooperative breeders in which...

Sunflower seed predation rates in Biodiversity and Ecosystem Function in Tropical Agriculture (BEFTA) plots, Kandista and Ujun Tanjung estates, Indonesia

A. E. Eycott, E.C. Turner, S. H. Luke & A. D. Advento
Data comprise sunflower seed predation rates (i.e. number of seeds remaining) after 24 hours under different treatments in 18 experimental plots plots established in 2013 as part of the Biodiversity and Ecosystem Function in Tropical Agriculture (BEFTA) programme. Eighteen plots were examined across three estates – plots in Ujung Tanjung and Kandista estates were planted in 1987 to 1992 and are mature or over-mature oil palm, while Libo plots were replanted in 2014. Plots were...

Oak-associated biodiversity in the UK (OakEcol)

R.J. Mitchell, P.E. Bellamy, C.J. Ellis, R.L. Hewison, N.G. Hodgetts, G.R. Iason, N.A. Littlewood, S. Newey, J.A. Stockan & A.F.S. Taylor
This dataset contains a list of all known birds, bryophytes, fungi, invertebrates, lichens and mammals that use oak (Quercus petraea and Quercus robur) in the UK. In total 2300 species are listed in the dataset. For each species we provide a level of association with oak, ranging from obligate (only found on oak) to cosmopolitan (found on a wide range of other tree species). Data on the ecology of each oak associated species is provided:...

Spectrum of mutational signatures in T-cell lymphoma reveals a key role for UV radiation in mycosis fungoides and Sezary syndrome

Christine Jones, Andrea Degasperi, Vieri Grandi, Tracey Mitchell & Serena Nik-Zainal
T-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas develop following transformation of tissue resident T-cells. We performed a meta-analysis of mutational catalogues derived from whole exome sequencing data from 403 patients with eight subtypes of T-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma to identify mutational signatures and recurrent gene mutations associated with specific causal peaks within these signatures. Signature 1, indicative of age-related deamination, was prevalent across all T-cell lymphoma subtypes, reflecting the derivation of these malignancies from memory T-cell subsets. The majority of...

A genome-wide investigation of adaptations related to tool use behaviour in New Caledonian and Hawaiian crows

Nicolas Dussex, Verena E. Kutschera, R. Axel W. Wiberg, Darren Parker, Gavin Hunt, Russell D. Gray, Kim Rutherford, Abe Hideaki, Robert Fleischer, Christian Rutz, Michael G. Ritchie, Jochen B.W. Wolf & Neil J. Gemmell
GFF3 file with protein-coding gne predictions for the C. moneduloides de novo genome assembly (available at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI); assembly accession number: VRTO00000000), generated using the MAKER2 pipeline.

Registration Year

  • 2019
    58

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    56
  • Collection
    2

Affiliations

  • University of Cambridge
    58
  • University of Edinburgh
    3
  • Plymouth University
    2
  • University of Vermont
    2
  • University of Aberdeen
    2
  • University of Otago
    2
  • King's College London
    2
  • University of East Anglia
    2
  • University of Zurich
    2
  • Griffith University
    2