47 Works

Catchment properties and the photosynthetic trait composition of freshwater plant communities

Lars Lønsmann Iversen, A. Winkel, L. Baastrup-Spohr, A. B. Hinke, J. Alahuhta, A. Baattrup-Pedersen, S. Birk, P. Brodersen, P. A. Chambers, F. Ecke, T. Feldmann, D. Gebler, J. Heino, T. S. Jespersen, S. J. Moe, T. Riis, L. Sass, O. Vestergaard, S. C. Maberly, K. Sand-Jensen & O. Pedersen
Unlike in land plants, photosynthesis in many aquatic plants relies on bicarbonate in addition to carbon dioxide (CO2) to compensate for the low diffusivity and potential depletion of CO2 in water. Concentrations of bicarbonate and CO2 vary greatly with catchment geology. In this study, we investigate whether there is a link between these concentrations and the frequency of freshwater plants possessing the bicarbonate use trait. We show, globally, that the frequency of plant species with...

Data from: Elements of metacommunity structure of diatoms and macroinvertebrates within stream networks differing in environmental heterogeneity

Siwen He, Kai Chen, Janne Soininen, Jani Heino, Ning Ding & Beixin Wang
Aim: Idealized metacommunity structures (i.e. checkerboard, random, quasi-structures, nested, Clementsian, Gleasonian, and evenly spaced) have recently gained increasing attention, but their relationships with environmental heterogeneity and how they vary with organism groups remain poorly understood. Here we tested two main hypotheses: (1) gradient-driven patterns (Clementsian and Gleasonian) occur frequently in heterogeneous environments, and (2) small organisms (here, diatoms) are more likely to exhibit gradient-driven patterns than large organisms (here, macroinvertebrates). Location: Streams in three regions...

Dynamics of a host-parasitoid interaction clarified by modelling and DNA sequencing

Marko Mutanen, Otso Ovaskainen, Gergely Várkonyi, Juhani Itämies, Sean W. J. Prosser, Paul D. N. Hebert & Ilkka Hanski
It has been hypothesized that the 2-year oscillations in abundance of Xestia moths are mediated by interactions with 1-year Ophion parasitoid wasps. We tested this hypothesis by modelling a 35-year time series of Xestia and Ophion from northern Finland. Additionally, we used DNA barcoding to ascertain the species diversity of Ophion and targeted amplicon sequencing of their gut contents to confirm their larval hosts. Modelling of the time-series data strongly supported the hypothesized host–parasitoid dynamics...

Data from: What data to use for forest conservation planning? A comparison of coarse open and detailed proprietary forest inventory data in Finland

Joona A. Lehtomäki, Sakari Tuominen, Tuuli Toivonen, Antti Leinonen & Joona Lehtomäki
The boreal region is facing intensifying resource extraction pressure, but the lack of comprehensive biodiversity data makes operative forest conservation planning difficult. Many countries have implemented forest inventory schemes and are making extensive and up-to-date forest databases increasingly available. Some of the more detailed inventory databases, however, remain proprietary and unavailable for conservation planning. Here, we investigate how well different open and proprietary forest inventory data sets suit the purpose of conservation prioritization in Finland....

Data from: Primary production calculations for sea ice from bio-optical observations in the Baltic Sea

Susann Müller, Anssi V. Vähätalo, Jari Uusikivi, Markus Majaneva, Sanna Majaneva, Riitta Autio & Janne-Markus Rintala
Bio-optics is a powerful approach for estimating photosynthesis rates, but has seldom been applied to sea ice, where measuring photosynthesis is a challenge. We measured absorption coefficients of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM), algae, and non-algal particles along with solar radiation, albedo and transmittance at four sea-ice stations in the Gulf of Finland, Baltic Sea. This unique compilation of optical and biological data for Baltic Sea ice was used to build a radiative transfer model...

Data from: Give me a sample of air and I will tell which species are found from your region – molecular identification of fungi from airborne spore samples

Nerea Abrego, Veera Norros, Panu Halme, Panu Somervuo, Heini Ali-Kovero & Otso Ovaskainen
Fungi are a megadiverse group of organisms, they play major roles in ecosystem functioning, and are important for human health, food production, and nature conservation. Our knowledge on fungal diversity and fungal ecology is however still very limited, in part because surveying and identifying fungi is time demanding and requires expert knowledge. We present a method that allows anyone to generate a list of fungal species likely to occur in a region of interest, with...

Data from: Future temperature and salinity do not exert selection pressure on cyst germination of a toxic phytoplankton species

Jacqueline Jerney, Sanna Suikkanen, Elin Lindehoff & Anke Kremp
Environmental conditions regulate the germination of phytoplankton resting stages. While some factors lead to synchronous germination, others stimulate germination of only a small fraction of the resting stages. This suggests that habitat filters may act on the germination level and thus affect selection of blooming strains. Benthic “seed banks” of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandria ostenfeldii from the Baltic Sea are genetically and phenotypically diverse, indicating a high potential for adaptation by selection on standing genetic...

Data from: Combined effects of local habitat, anthropogenic stress, and dispersal on stream ecosystems: a mesocosm experiment

Jarno Turunen, Pauliina Louhi, Heikki Mykrä, Jukka Aroviita, Emmi Putkonen, Ari Huusko & Timo Muotka
The effects of anthropogenic stressors on community structure and ecosystem functioning can be strongly influenced by local habitat structure and dispersal from source communities. Catchment land uses increase the input of fine sediments into stream channels, clogging the interstitial spaces of benthic habitats. Aquatic macrophytes enhance habitat heterogeneity and mediate important ecosystem functions, being thus a key component of habitat structure in many streams. Therefore, the recovery of macrophytes following in-stream habitat modification may be...

Contrasting latitudinal patterns in diversity and stability in a high-latitude species-rich moth community

Laura Antão, Juha Pöyry, Reima Leinonen & Tomas Roslin
Aim Biodiversity is currently undergoing rapid restructuring across the globe. However, the nature of biodiversity change is not well understood, as community‐level changes may hide differential responses in individual population trajectories. Here, we quantify spatio‐temporal community and stability dynamics using a long‐term high‐quality moth monitoring dataset. Location Finland, Northern Europe. Time period 1993–2012. Major taxa studied Nocturnal moths (Lepidoptera). Methods We quantified patterns of change in species richness, total abundance, dominance and temporal variability at...

Assessing the conservation priority of freshwater lake sites based on taxonomic, functional and environmental uniqueness

Jani Heino, Jorge García-Girón, Seppo Hellsten, Jari Ilmonen, Juha Karjalainen, Teemu Mäkinen, Kristiina Nyholm, Janne Ropponen, Antti Takolander & Kimmo T. Tolonen
Aim: We propose a novel approach that considers taxonomic uniqueness, functional uniqueness and environmental uniqueness, and show how it can be used in guiding conservation planning. We illustrate the approach using data for lake biota and environment. Location: Lake Puruvesi, Finland. Methods: We sampled macrophytes and macroinvertebrates from the same 18 littoral sites. By adapting the original ‘ecological uniqueness’ approach, we used distance‒based methods to calculate measures of taxonomic (LCBD‒t), functional (LCBD‒f) and environmental (LCEH)...

Microclimatic variability buffers butterfly populations against increased mortality caused by phenological asynchrony between larvae and their host plants

Susu Rytteri, Mikko Kuussaari & Marjo Saastamoinen
Climate change affects insects in several ways, including phenological shifts that may cause asynchrony between herbivore insects and their host plants. Insect larvae typically have limited movement capacity and are consequently dependent on the microhabitat conditions of their immediate surroundings. Based on intensive field monitoring over two springs and on larger-scale metapopulation-level survey over the same years, we used Bayesian spatial regression modelling to study the effects of weather and microclimatic field conditions on the...

Data from: Does trait-based joint species distribution modelling reveal the signature of competition in stream macroinvertebrate communities?

Merja Elo, Jenny Jyrkänkallio-Mikkola, Otso Ovaskainen, Janne Soininen, Kimmo Tolonen & Jani Heino
1. The occupancy and abundance of species are jointly driven by local factors, such as environmental characteristics and biotic interactions, and regional-scale factors, such as dispersal and climate. Recently, it has been shown that biotic interactions shape species occupancies and abundances beyond local extents. However, for small ectothermic animals, particularly for those occurring in freshwater environments, the importance of biotic interactions remains understudied. Species-to-species associations from joint species distribution models (i.e. species associations while controlling...

Data from: Climate-driven hydrological variability determines inter-annual changes in stream invertebrate community assembly

Romain Sarremejane, Heikki Mykra, Kaisa-Leena Huttunen, Kaisa-Riikka Mustonen, Hannu Marttila, Riku Paavola, Kalle Sippel, Noora Veijalainen & Timo Muotka
Although flow regime is one of the major drivers of riverine communities, not much is known about how inter-annual variability and extremes of flow influence community assembly mechanisms. We used data on benthic macroinvertebrates and modelled flow regimes in 23 near-pristine boreal streams to assess how community assembly mechanisms and species occupancy varied in response to inter-annual variability in flow conditions across 11 successive years encompassing extreme (both low and high) flow events. A null...

Data from: Environmental degradation results in contrasting changes in the assembly processes of stream bacterial and fungal communities

Heikki Mykra, Mikko Tolkkinen & Jani Heino
Environmental degradation may have strong effects on community assembly processes. We examined the assembly of bacterial and fungal communities in anthropogenically altered and near-pristine streams. Using pyrosequencing of bacterial and fungal DNA from decomposed alder Alnus incana leaves, we specifically examined if environmental degradation deterministically decreases or increases the compositional turnover of bacterial and fungal communities. Our results showed that near-pristine streams and anthropogenically altered streams supported distinct fungal and bacterial communities. The mechanisms assembling...

Data from: Ignoring spatial effects results in inadequate models for variation in littoral macroinvertebrate diversity

Kimmo T. Tolonen, Annika Vilmi, Satu-Maaria Karjalainen, Seppo Hellsten, Tapio Sutela & Jani Heino
Studies focusing on the effects of spatial processes versus environmental filtering on aquatic metacommunities have so far been focused almost entirely on relatively isolated systems, such as sets of different lakes or streams. In contrast, metacommunity patterns and underlying processes within a single aquatic system have received less attention. In this study, we aimed to examine how strongly variations in different diversity indices are affected by spatial processes (dispersal) versus local environmental conditions (species sorting)...

Data from: A meta-analysis of nestedness and turnover components of beta diversity across organisms and ecosystems

Janne Soininen, Jani Heino & Jianjun Wang
The number of studies investigating the nestedness and turnover components of beta diversity has increased substantially, but our general understanding of the drivers of turnover and nestedness remains elusive. Here, we examined the effects of species traits, spatial extent, latitude and ecosystem type on the nestedness and turnover components of beta diversity. From the 99 studies that partition total beta diversity into its turnover and nestedness components, we assembled 269 and 259 data points for...

Data from: Differential responses by stream and riparian biodiversity to in-stream restoration of forestry-impacted streams

Jarno Turunen, Jukka Aroviita, Hannu Marttila, Pauliina Louhi, Tiina Laamanen, Mikko Tolkkinen, Pirkko-Liisa Luhta, Bjørn Kløve & Timo Muotka
1. Forestry can have detrimental impacts on stream ecosystems, particularly via excessive sedimentation. A key challenge to stream management is therefore to identify the best restoration practices to mitigate the harmful impacts of fine sediments on stream biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. 2. We studied the effects of restoration of sediment-impacted headwater streams on the habitat structure, hydrologic retention, biodiversity (microbes, bryophytes, benthic macroinvertebrates, riparian plants) and ecosystem functions (periphyton accrual rate and leaf breakdown) by...

Data from: Assessing strengths and weaknesses of DNA metabarcoding based macroinvertebrate identification for routine stream monitoring

Vasco Elbrecht, Ecaterina Edith Vamos, Kristian Meissner, Jukka Aroviita & Florian Leese
1) DNA metabarcoding holds great promise for the assessment of macroinvertebrates in stream ecosystems. However, few large-scale studies have compared the performance of DNA metabarcoding with that of routine morphological identification. 2) We performed metabarcoding using four primer sets on macroinvertebrate samples from 18 stream sites across Finland. The samples were collected in 2013 and identified based on morphology as part of a Finnish stream monitoring program. Specimens were morphologically classified, following standardised protocols, to...

Data from: Rehabilitating the cyanobacteria – niche partitioning, resource use efficiency, and phytoplankton community structure during diazotrophic cyanobacterial blooms

Kalle Olli, Riina Klais & Timo Tamminen
1. Blooms of nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria are recurrent phenomena in marine and freshwater habitats, and their supplying role in aquatic biogeochemical cycles is generally considered vital. The objective of this study is to analyze if an increasing proportion of nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria affects (i) the composition of the non-diazotrophic component of ambient phytoplankton communities, and (ii) resource use efficiency (RUE; ratio of chl a to total nutrients) – an important ecosystem function. We hypothesize that diazotrophs increase...

Data for: Combining range and phenology shifts offers a winning strategy for boreal Lepidoptera

Maria Hällfors, Maria Hällfors, Juha Pöyry, Janne Heliölä, Ilmari Kohonen, Mikko Kuussaari, Reima Leinonen, Reto Schmucki, Pasi Sihvonen & Marjo Saastamoinen
Species can adapt to climate change by adjusting in situ or by dispersing to new areas, and these strategies may complement or enhance each other. Here, we investigate temporal shifts in phenology and spatial shifts in northern range boundaries for 289 Lepidoptera species by using long-term data sampled over two decades. While 40% of the species neither advanced phenology nor moved northward, nearly half (45%) used one of the two strategies. The strongest positive population...

Differential speciation rates, colonization time, and niche conservatism affect community assembly across adjacent biogeographical regions

Ronildo Benício, Diogo Provete, Mariana Lyra, Jani Heino, Célio Haddad, Denise De C. Rossa-Feres & Fernando Da Silva
Aim: To test the importance of evolutionary and biogeographic processes in shaping the assembly of local frog communities in two adjacent regions (hereafter, coastal and inland regions) with different historical signatures. We asked two main questions: i) why does the coastal region harbor more frog species than the inland region? and ii) how do these processes affect the relationship between the spatial variation of taxonomic, phylogenetic, and functional diversities within and across these regions? Location:...

Blue consequences of the green bioeconomy: clear-cutting intensifies the harmful impacts of land drainage on stream invertebrate biodiversity

Maria Rajakallio, Jussi Jyväsjärvi, Timo Muotka & Jukka Aroviita
1. Growing bioeconomy is increasing the pressure to clear-cut drained peatland forests. Yet, the cumulative effects of peatland drainage and clear-cutting on the biodiversity of recipient freshwater ecosystems are largely unknown. 2. We studied the isolated and combined effects of peatland drainage and clear-cutting on stream macroinvertebrate communities. We further explored whether the impact of these forestry-driven catchment alterations to benthic invertebrates is related to stream size. We quantified the impact on invertebrate biodiversity by...

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