13 Works

Data from: Specificity, rank preference and the colonization of a non-native host plant by the Melissa blue butterfly

Matthew L. Forister, Cynthia F. Scholl, Josh P. Jahner, Joseph S. Wilson, James A. Fordyce, Zach Gompert, Divya R. Narala, C. Alex Buerkle & Chris C. Nice
Animals often express behavioral preferences for different types of food or other resources, and these preferences can evolve or shift following association with novel food types. Shifts in preference can involve at least two phenomena: a change in rank preference or a change in specificity. The former corresponds to a change in the order in which hosts are preferred, while a shift in specificity can be an increase in the tendency to utilize multiple hosts....

Data from: De novo characterization of the Timema cristinae transcriptome facilitates marker discovery and inference of genetic divergence.

Aaron A. Comeault, Mathew Sommers, Tanja Schwander, C. Alex Buerkle, Timothy E. Farkas, Patrik Nosil & Thomas L. Parchman
Adaptation to different ecological environments can promote speciation. Although numerous examples of such ‘ecological speciation’ exist, the genomic basis of the process, and the role of gene flow in it, remains less understood. This is, at least in part, because systems that are well characterized in terms of their ecology often lack genomic resources. In this study we characterize the transcriptome of Timema cristinae stick insects, a system that has been researched intensively in terms...

Data from: A simulation–based evaluation of methods for inferring linear barriers to gene flow

Christopher Blair, Dana E. Weigel, Matthew Balazik, Annika T. H. Keeley, Faith M. Walker, Erin Landguth, Samuel Cushman, Melanie Murphy, Lisette Waits & Niko Balkenhol
Different analytical techniques used on the same data set may lead to different conclusions about the existence and strength of genetic structure. Therefore, reliable interpretation of the results from different methods depends on the efficacy and reliability of different statistical methods. In this paper we evaluate the performance of multiple analytical methods to detect the presence of a linear barrier dividing populations. We were specifically interested in determining if simulation conditions, such as dispersal ability...

Data from: Post-fire changes in forest carbon storage over a 300-year chronosequence of Pinus contorta-dominated forests

Daniel M. Kashian, William H. Romme, Daniel Tinker, Monica G. Turner, Michael G. Ryan & Daniel B. Tinker
A warming climate may increase the frequency and severity of stand-replacing wildfires, reducing carbon (C) storage in forest ecosystems. Understanding the variability of post-fire C cycling on heterogeneous landscapes is critical for predicting changes in C storage with more frequent disturbance. We measured C pools and fluxes for 77 lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud var. latifolia Engelm.) stands in and around Yellowstone National Park (YNP) along a 300-year chronosequence to examine how quickly...

Data from: Assortative flocking in crossbills and implications for ecological speciation

Julie W. Smith, Stephanie M. Sjoberg, Matthew C. Mueller & Craig W. Benkman
How reproductive isolation is related to divergent natural selection is a central question in speciation. Here we focus on several ecologically specialised taxa or “call types” of red crossbills (Loxia curvirostra complex), one of the few groups of birds providing much evidence for ecological speciation. Call types differ in bill sizes and feeding capabilities, and also differ in vocalizations, such that contact calls provide information on crossbill phenotype. We found that two call types of...

Data from: Population genetic structure of Picea engelmannii, P. glauca and their previously unrecognized hybrids in the central Rocky Mountains

Monia S. H. Haselhorst & C. Alex Buerkle
Areas of geographic overlap between potentially hybridizing species provide the opportunity to study interspecific gene flow and reproductive barriers. Here we identified hybrids between Picea engelmannii and P. glauca by their genetic composition at 17 microsatellite markers, and determined the broad-scale geographic distribution of hybrids in the central Rocky Mountains of North America, a geographic region where hybrids and isolation between species had not previously been studied. Parameter estimates from admixture models revealed considerable variation...

Data from: Genome divergence and the genetic architecture of barriers to gene flow between Lycaeides idas and L. melissa

Zachariah Gompert, Lauren K. Lucas, Chris Clark Nice & C. Alex Buerkle
Genome divergence during speciation is a dynamic process that is affected by various factors, including the genetic architecture of barriers to gene flow. Herein we quantitatively describe aspects of the genetic architecture of two sets of traits, male genitalic morphology and oviposition preference, that putatively function as barriers to gene flow between the butterfly species Lycaeides idas and L. melissa. Our analyses are based on unmapped DNA sequence data and a recently developed Bayesian regression...

Data from: Resilience and regime change in a southern Rocky Mountain ecosystem during the past 17000 years

Thomas A. Minckley, Robert K. Shriver, Bryan N. Shuman & B Shuman
Paleoecological records indicate that subalpine forests in western North America have been resilient in response to multiple influences, including severe droughts, insect outbreaks, and widely varying fire regimes, over many millennia. One hypothesis for explaining this ecosystem resilience centers on the disruption of forest dynamics by frequent disturbance and climatic variability, and the resulting development of non- steady-state regimes dominated by early-succession conifers with broad climatic tolerances, such as lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. latifolia...

Data from: Consistency and variation in phenotypic selection exerted by a community of seed predators

Craig W. Benkman, Julie W. Smith, Monika Maier, Leif Hansen & Matt V. Talluto
Phenotypic selection that is sustained over time underlies both anagenesis and cladogenesis, but the conditions that lead to such selection and what causes variation in selection are not well known. We measured the selection exerted by three species of predispersal seed predators of lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta latifolia) in the South Hills, Idaho and found that net selection on different cone and seed traits exerted by red crossbills (Loxia curvirostra) and cone borer moths (Eucosma...

Data from: Sensitivity to phosphorus limitation increases with ploidy level in a New Zealand snail

Maurine Neiman, Adam D. Kay & Amy C. Krist
Evolutionary and ecological factors that explain natural variation in ploidy level remain poorly understood. One intriguing possibility is that nutrient costs associated with higher per-cell nucleic acid content could differentially influence the fitness of different ploidy levels. Here, we test this hypothesis by determining whether access to phosphorus (P), a main component of nucleic acids, differentially affects growth rate in asexual freshwater snails (Potamopyrgus antipodarum) that differ in ploidy. As expected if larger genomes generate...

Data from: The genomic consequences of adaptive divergence and reproductive isolation between species of manakins

Thomas L. Parchman, Zachariah Gompert, Michael J. Braun, Robb T. Brumfield, D. B. McDonald, J. Albert C. Uy, G. Zhang, Erich D. Jarvis, B. A. Schlinger & C. A. Buerkle
The processes of adaptation and speciation are expected to shape genomic variation within and between diverging species. Here we analyze genomic heterogeneity of genetic differentiation and introgression in a hybrid zone between two bird species (Manacus candei and M. vitellinus) using 59 100 SNPs, a whole genome assembly, and Bayesian models. Measures of genetic differentiation (inline image) and introgression (genomic cline center [α] and rate [β]) were highly heterogeneous among loci. We identified thousands of...

Data from: Genome-wide association genetics of an adaptive trait in lodgepole pine

Thomas L. Parchman, Zachariah Gompert, Craig W. Benkman, Faye D. Schilkey, Joann Mudge & C. Alex Buerkle
Pine cones that remain closed and retain seeds until fire causes the cones to open (cone serotiny) represent a key adaptive trait in a variety of pine species. In lodgepole pine, there is substantial geographic variation in serotiny across the Rocky Mountain region. This variation in serotiny has evolved as a result of geographically divergent selection, with consequences that extend to forest communities and ecosystems. An understanding of the genetic architecture of this trait is...

Data from: Genomic regions with a history of divergent selection affect fitness of hybrids between two butterfly species

Zachariah Gompert, Lauren K. Lucas, Chris Clark Nice, James Andrew Fordyce, Matthew L. Forister & C. Alex Buerkle
Speciation is the process by which reproductively isolated lineages arise, and is one of the fundamental means by which the diversity of life increases. Whereas numerous studies have documented an association between ecological divergence and reproductive isolation, relatively little is known about the role of natural selection in genome divergence during the process of speciation. Here we use genome-wide DNA sequences and Bayesian models to test the hypothesis that loci under divergent selection between two...

Registration Year

  • 2012
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  • University of Wyoming
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  • University of Nevada Reno
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  • Pacific Lutheran University
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  • Texas State University
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  • University of Montana
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  • Duke University
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  • Wayne State University
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  • University of Groningen
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  • National Center for Genome Resources
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  • Smithsonian Institution
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