14 Works

Data from: Time-integrated habitat availability is a resource attribute that informs patterns of use in intertidal areas

Leonardo Calle, Lauri Green, Allan Strong & Dale E. Gawlik
In dynamic environments, resource availability may change by several orders of magnitude, over hours to months, but the duration of resource availability is not often included as a characteristic attribute of resources even though temporal resource dynamics might limit patterns of use. In our study of wading birds foraging in intertidal areas, tides cause large changes in the areal extent of shallow-water foraging habitat (i.e., the resource), but tides also constrain the duration of availability,...

Data from: Temporal dynamics of the genetic clines of invasive European green crab (Carcinus maenas) in eastern North America

Sarah J. Lehnert, Claudio DiBacco, Nicholas W. Jeffery, April M.H. Blakeslee, Jonatan Isaksson, Joe Roman, Brendan F. Wringe, Ryan R.E. Stanley, Kyle Matheson, Cynthia H. McKenzie, Lorraine C. Hamilton, Ian R. Bradbury, Ryan R. E. Stanley & April M. H. Blakeslee
Two genetically distinct lineages of European green crabs (Carcinus maenas) were independently introduced to eastern North America, the first in the early 19th century and the second in the late 20th century. These lineages first came into secondary contact in southeastern Nova Scotia, Canada (NS), where they hybridized, producing latitudinal genetic clines. Previous studies have documented a persistent southward shift in the clines of different marker types, consistent with existing dispersal and recruitment pathways. We...

Data from: Dissecting the basis of novel trait evolution in a radiation with widespread phylogenetic discordance

Meng Wu, Jamie L. Kostyun, Matthew W. Hahn & Leonie C. Moyle
Phylogenetic analyses of trait evolution can provide insight into the evolutionary processes that initiate and drive phenotypic diversification. However, recent phylogenomic studies have revealed extensive gene tree-species tree discordance, which can lead to incorrect inferences of trait evolution if only a single species tree is used for analysis. This phenomenon—dubbed “hemiplasy”—is particularly important to consider during analyses of character evolution in rapidly radiating groups, where discordance is widespread. Here we generate whole-transcriptome data for a...

Data from: Golden orbweavers ignore biological rules: phylogenomic and comparative analyses unravel a complex evolution of sexual size dimorphism

Matjaz Kuntner, Chris Hamilton, Ren-Chung Cheng, Matjaz Gregoric, Nik Lupse, Tjasa Lokovsek, Emily Moriarty Lemmon, Alan R. Lemmon, Ingi Agnarsson, Jonathan A. Coddington, Jason Bond, Chris A Hamilton & Jason E Bond
Instances of sexual size dimorphism (SSD) provide the context for rigorous tests of biological rules of size evolution, such as Cope’s Rule (phyletic size increase), Rensch’s Rule (allometric patterns of male and female size), as well as male and female body size optima. In certain spider groups, such as the golden orbweavers (Nephilidae), extreme female-biased SSD (eSSD, female:male body length ≥ 2) is the norm. Nephilid genera construct webs of exaggerated proportions, which can be...

Data from: Changes in African large carnivore diets over the past half-century reveal the loss of large prey

Scott Creel, Wigganson Matandiko, Paul Schuette, Elias Rosenblatt, Carolyn Sanguinetti, Kambwiri Banda, Milan Vinks & Matthew Becker
1. Globally, large carnivores are declining due to direct persecution, habitat loss and prey depletion. The effects of prey depletion could be amplified by changes in the composition of the herbivore (prey) community that provoke changes in carnivore diets, but this possibility has received little attention. 2. Here, we tested for changes over the past half century in prey selection by the large carnivore guild in Zambia’s Kafue National Park. 3. Across 52 predator-prey dyads,...

Data from: Ecosystem context illuminates conflicting roles of plant diversity in carbon storage

E. Carol Adair, David U. Hooper, Alain Paquette & Bruce A. Hungate
Plant diversity can increase biomass production in plot‐scale studies, but applying these results to ecosystem carbon (C) storage at larger spatial and temporal scales remains problematic. Other ecosystem controls interact with diversity and plant production, and may influence soil pools differently from plant pools. We integrated diversity with the state‐factor framework, which identifies key controls, or ‘state factors’, over ecosystem properties and services such as C storage. We used this framework to assess the effects...

Data from: Large mammal declines and the incipient loss of mammal-bird mutualisms in an African savanna ecosystem

Nathan Diplock, Kate Johnston, Antoine Mellon, Laura Mitchell, Madison Moore, Daniel Schneider, Alyssa Taylor, Jess Whitney, Kera Zegar, John Kioko & Christian Kiffner
Over the past half-century, large mammal populations have declined substantially throughout East Africa, mainly due to habitat loss and unsustainable direct exploitation. While it has been acknowledged that the loss of large mammals can have direct and cascading effects on community composition and ecosystem characteristics, limited quantitative work has been done on how declines of large herbivore populations impacts the abundance of mutualistic symbionts. Using a space-for-time observational approach, we quantified the large mammal community...

Data from: Herbarium specimens reveal increasing herbivory over the past century

Emily K. Meineke, Aimee T. Classen, Nathan J. Sanders & T. Jonathan Davies
Predicting how ecological interactions will respond to global change is a major challenge. Plants and their associated insect herbivores compose much of macroscopic diversity, yet how their interactions have been altered by recent environmental change remains underexplored. To address this gap, we quantified herbivory on herbarium specimens of four plant species with records extending back 112 years. Our study focused on the northeastern US, where temperatures have increased rapidly over the last few decades. This...

Data from: Environmental enrichment normalizes hippocampal timing coding in a malformed hippocampus

Amanda E. Hernan, J. Matthew Mahoney, Willie Curry, Greg Richard, Marcella M. Lucas, Andrew Massey, Gregory L. Holmes, Rodney C. Scott & Rod C. Scott
Neurodevelopmental insults leading to malformations of cortical development (MCD) are a common cause of psychiatric disorders, learning impairments and epilepsy. In the methylazoxymethanol (MAM) model of MCDs, animals have impairments in spatial cognition that, remarkably, are improved by post-weaning environmental enrichment (EE). To establish how EE impacts network-level mechanisms of spatial cognition, hippocampal in vivo single unit recordings were performed in freely moving animals in an open arena. We took a generalized linear modeling approach...

Data from: Increase in crop losses to insect pests in a warming climate

Curtis A. Deutsch, Joshua J. Tewksbury, Michelle Tigchelaar, David S. Battisti, Scott C. Merrill, Raymond B. Huey & Rosamond L. Naylor
Insect pests substantially reduce yields of three staple grains—rice, maize, and wheat—but models assessing the agricultural impacts of global warming rarely consider crop losses to insects. We use established relationships between temperature and the population growth and metabolic rates of insects to estimate how and where climate warming will augment losses of rice, maize, and wheat to insects. Global yield losses of these grains are projected to increase by 10 to 25% per degree of...

Data from: Evaluation of acoustic telemetry grids for determining aquatic animal movement and survival

Richard T. Kraus, Christopher M. Holbrook, Christopher S. Vandergoot, Taylor R. Stewart, Matthew D. Faust, Douglas A. Watkinson, Colin Charles, Mark Pegg, Eva C. Enders & Charles C. Krueger
1. Acoustic telemetry studies have frequently prioritized linear configurations of hydrophone receivers, such as perpendicular from shorelines or across rivers, to detect the presence of tagged aquatic animals. This approach introduces unknown bias when receivers are stationed for convenience at geographic bottlenecks (e.g., at the mouth of an embayment or between islands) as opposed to deployments following a statistical sampling design. 2. We evaluated two-dimensional acoustic receiver arrays (grids: receivers spread uniformly across space) as...

Data from: The polyphyly of Plasmodium: comprehensive phylogenetic analyses of the malaria parasites (order Haemosporida) reveal widespread taxonomic conflict

Spencer C. Galen, Janus Borner, Ellen S. Martinsen, Juliane Schaer, Christopher C. Austin, Christopher J. West & Susan L. Perkins
The evolutionary relationships among the apicomplexan blood pathogens known as the malaria parasites (order Haemosporida), some of which infect nearly 200 million humans each year, has remained a vexing phylogenetic problem due to limitations in taxon sampling, character sampling, and the extreme nucleotide base composition biases that are characteristic of this clade. Previous phylogenetic work on the malaria parasites has often lacked sufficient representation of the broad taxonomic diversity within the Haemosporida or the multi-locus...

Data from: Rapid establishment of a flowering cline in Medicago polymorpha after invasion of North America

Emily Helliwell, Joshua Faber-Hammond, Zoie Lopez, Aaron Garouette, Eric Von Wettberg, Maren Friesen & Stephanie Porter
To establish and spread in a new location, an invasive species must be able to carry out its life cycle in novel environmental conditions. A key trait underlying fitness is the shift from vegetative to reproductive growth through floral development. In this study, we used a common garden experiment and genotyping-by-sequencing to test whether the latitudinal flowering cline of the North American invasive plant Medicago polymorpha was translocated from its European native range through multiple...

Data from: Crop pests and predators exhibit inconsistent responses to surrounding landscape composition

Daniel S. Karp, Rebecca Chaplin-Kramer, Timothy D. Meehan, Emily A. Martin, Fabrice DeClerck, Heather Grab, Claudio Gratton, Lauren Hunt, Ashley E. Larsen, Alejandra Martínez-Salinas, Megan E. O’Rourke, Adrien Rusch, Katja Poveda, Mattias Jonsson, Jay A. Rosenheim, Nancy A. Schellhorn, Teja Tscharntke, Stephen D. Wratten, Wei Zhang, Aaron L. Iverson, Lynn S. Adler, Matthias Albrecht, Audrey Alignier, Gina M. Angelella, Muhammad Zubair Anjum … & Yi Zou
The idea that noncrop habitat enhances pest control and represents a win–win opportunity to conserve biodiversity and bolster yields has emerged as an agroecological paradigm. However, while noncrop habitat in landscapes surrounding farms sometimes benefits pest predators, natural enemy responses remain heterogeneous across studies and effects on pests are inconclusive. The observed heterogeneity in species responses to noncrop habitat may be biological in origin or could result from variation in how habitat and biocontrol are...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    14

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    14

Affiliations

  • University of Vermont
    14
  • Michigan State University
    3
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst
    2
  • University of Washington
    2
  • Stanford University
    2
  • Montana State University
    2
  • University of Padua
    1
  • University of Quebec at Montreal
    1
  • Universidade Federal de Goiás
    1
  • Bloomsburg University
    1