28 Works

Data from: Dissecting molecular evolution in the highly diverse plant clade Caryophyllales using transcriptome sequencing

Ya Yang, Michael J. Moore, Samuel F. Brockington, Douglas E. Soltis, Gane Ka-Shu Wong, Eric J. Carpenter, Yong Zhang, Li Chen, Zhixiang Yan, Yinlong Xie, Rowan F. Sage, Sarah Covshoff, Julian M. Hibberd, Matthew N. Nelson & Stephen A. Smith
Many phylogenomic studies based on transcriptomes have been limited to “single-copy” genes due to methodological challenges in homology and orthology inferences. Only a relatively small number of studies have explored analyses beyond reconstructing species relationships. We sampled 69 transcriptomes in the hyperdiverse plant clade Caryophyllales and 27 outgroups from annotated genomes across eudicots. Using a combined similarity- and phylogenetic tree-based approach, we recovered 10,960 homolog groups, where each was represented by at least eight ingroup...

Data from: Molecular phylogeny of the diverse parasitoid wasp genus Ophion Fabricius (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae: Ophioninae)

Marla D. Schwarzfeld, Gavin R. Broad & Felix A. H. Sperling
Ophion Fabricius is a diverse genus of nocturnal ichneumonid wasps (Insecta: Hymenoptera) that is particularly species-rich in temperate areas, yet has received little taxonomic attention in the Holarctic region, where most species occur. While there have been some attempts to divide Ophion into monophyletic species groups, the vast majority of species have been lumped into a single, paraphyletic group, the O. luteus species group, which is defined only by the lack of characters specific to...

Data from: Assessing the evolutionary history of the class Synurophyceae (Heterokonta) using molecular, morphometric, and paleobiological approaches

Peter A. Siver, Bok Yeon Jo, Jong Im Kim, Woongghi Shin, Anne Marie Lizarralde, Alexander P. Wolfe & A. M. Lott
Premise of the study: Heterokont algae of the class Synurophyceae, characterized by distinctive siliceous scales that cover the surface of the cell, are ecologically important in inland waters, yet their evolutionary history remains enigmatic. We explore phylogenetic relationships within this group of algae relative to geologic time, with a focus on evolution of siliceous components. Methods: We combined an expansive five-gene and time-calibrated molecular phylogeny of synurophyte algae with an extensive array of fossil specimens...

Data from: The origin and evolution of phototropins

Fay-Wei Li, Kathleen M. Pryer, Gane K.-S. Wong, Carl J. Rothfels, Michael Melkonian, Sarah Mathews, Juan C. Villarreal & Sean W. Graham
Plant phototropism, the ability to bend toward or away from light, is predominantly controlled by blue-light photoreceptors, the phototropins. Although phototropins have been well-characterized in Arabidopsis thaliana, their evolutionary history is largely unknown. In this study, we complete an in-depth survey of phototropin homologs across land plants and algae using newly available transcriptomic and genomic data. We show that phototropins originated in an ancestor of Viridiplantae (land plants + green algae). Phototropins repeatedly underwent independent...

Data from: Influence of in-situ oil sands development on caribou (Rangifer tarandus) movement

Tyler B. Muhly, Robert Serrouya, Eric Neilson, Haitao Li, Stan Boutin & Tyler Muhly
In-situ oil sands development (ISD) involves a network of facilities, wells, roads and pipelines to extract and transport subsurface bitumen. This technology is rapidly expanding and there is uncertainty whether ISDs restrict animal movement, leading to increased extinction probabilities for some wide-ranging species. Here we test for effects of simulated future (i.e., 50 years from now) and current ISDs on simulated movements of woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus), a threatened species across North America. In simulations...

Data from: Genetic subdivision and candidate genes under selection in North American gray wolves

Rena M. Schweizer, Bridgett M. VonHoldt, Ryan Harrigan, James C. Knowles, Marco Musiani, David Coltman, John Novembre & Robert K. Wayne
Previous genetic studies of the highly mobile gray wolf (Canis lupus) found population structure that coincides with habitat and phenotype differences. We hypothesized that these ecologically distinct populations (ecotypes) should exhibit signatures of selection in genes related to morphology, coat color, and metabolism. To test these predictions, we quantified population structure related to habitat using a genotyping array to assess variation in 42,036 SNPs in 111 North American gray wolves. Using these SNP data and...

Data from: Hybrid system increases efficiency of ballast water treatment

Esteban M. Paolucci, Marco R. Hernandez, Alexei Potapov, Mark A. Lewis & Hugh J. MacIsaac
1. Ballast water has been a principal pathway of nonindigenous species introduction to global ports for much of the 20th century. In an effort to reduce the scale of this pathway, and recognizing forthcoming global regulations that will supplant ballast water exchange (BWE) with ballast water treatment (BWT), we explore whether a combined hybrid treatment of BWE and chlorination (Cl) exceeds individual effects of either BWE or chlorination alone in reducing densities of bacteria, microplankton...

Data from: Unraveling conflicting density- and distance-dependent effects on plant reproduction using a spatially-explicit approach

José M. Fedriani, Thorsten Wiegand, Gemma Calvo, Alberto Suárez-Esteban, Miguel Jácome, Magdalena Żywiec & Miguel Delibes
1. Density- and distance-dependent (DDD) mechanisms are important determinants of plant reproductive success (PRS). Different components of sequential PRS can operate either in the same or in different directions and thus reinforce or neutralize each other, and they may also operate at different spatial scales. Thus, spatially-explicit approaches are needed to detect such complex DDD effects across multiple PRS components and spatial scales. 2. To reveal DDD effects of different components of early PRS of...

Data from: How many routes lead to migration? Comparison of methods to assess and characterise migratory movements

Francesca Cagnacci, Stefano Focardi, Anne Ghisla, Bram Van Moorter, Eliezer Gurarie, Marco Heurich, Atle Mysterud, John Linnell, Manuela Panzacchi, Evelyn Merrill, Roel May, Torgeir Nygård, Christer Rolandsen, Mark Hebblewhite & Evelyn H. Merrill
1. Decreasing rate of migration in several species as a consequence of climate change and anthropic pressure, together with increasing evidence of space-use strategies intermediate between residency and complete migration, are very strong motivations to evaluate migration occurrence and features in animal populations. 2. The main goal of this paper was to perform a relative comparison between methods for identifying and characterising migration at the individual and population level on the basis of animal location...

Data from: Effects of ambient noise on detectability and localization of avian songs and tones by observers in grasslands

Nicola Koper, Lionel Leston, Tyne M. Baker, Claire Curry & Patricia Rosa
Probability of detection and accuracy of distance estimates in aural avian surveys may be affected by the presence of anthropogenic noise, and this may lead to inaccurate evaluations of the effects of noisy infrastructure on wildlife. We used arrays of speakers broadcasting recordings of grassland bird songs and pure tones to assess the probability of detection, and localization accuracy, by observers at sites with and without noisy oil and gas infrastructure in south-central Alberta from...

Data from: Postcrania of juvenile Pinacosaurus grangeri (Ornithischia: Ankylosauria) from the Upper Cretaceous Alagteeg Formation, Alag Teeg, Mongolia: implications for ontogenetic allometry in ankylosaurs

Michael E. Burns, Tatiana A. Tumanova & Philip J. Currie
The ankylosaurine Pinacosaurus is one of the best known ankylosaur to date in terms of the number and preservational quality of specimens. Juvenile to sub-adult postcrania collected by the Soviet-Mongolian Paleontological Expedition from the Upper Cretaceous Alagteeg Formation at Alag Teeg, Mongolia can be assigned to Pinacosaurus grangeri based on discrete cranial characters. One individual is significantly larger than the others and demonstrates delayed fusion of postcranial elements with the earliest occurring between dorsal ribs...

Data from: Fine root dynamics in lodgepole pine and white spruce stands along productivity gradients in reclaimed oil sands sites

Ghulam Murtaza Jamro, Scott X. Chang, M. Anne Naeth, Min Duan & Jason House
Open-pit mining activities in the oil sands region of Alberta, Canada, create disturbed lands that, by law, must be reclaimed to a land capability equivalent to that existed before the disturbance. Re-establishment of forest cover will be affected by the production and turnover rate of fine roots. However, the relationship between fine root dynamics and tree growth has not been studied in reclaimed oil sands sites. Fine root properties (root length density, mean surface area,...

Data from: Worldwide evidence of a unimodal relationship between productivity and plant species richness

Lauchlan H. Fraser, Jason Pither, Anke Jentsch, Marcelo Sternberg, Martin Zobel, Diana Askarizadeh, Sandor Bartha, Carl Beierkuhnlein, Jonathan A. Bennett, Alex Bittel, Bazartseren Boldgiv, Ilsi I. Boldrini, Edward Bork, Leslie Brown, Marcelo Cabido, James Cahill, Cameron N. Carlyle, Giandiego Campetella, Stefano Chelli, Ofer Cohen, Anna-Maria Csergo, Sandra Diaz, Lucas Enrico, David Ensing, Alessandra Fidelis … & Talita Zupo
The search for predictions of species diversity across environmental gradients has challenged ecologists for decades. The humped-back model (HBM) suggests that plant diversity peaks at intermediate productivity; at low productivity few species can tolerate the environmental stresses, and at high productivity a few highly competitive species dominate. Over time the HBM has become increasingly controversial, and recent studies claim to have refuted it. Here, by using data from coordinated surveys conducted throughout grasslands worldwide and...

Data from: The evolutionary history of ferns inferred from 25 low-copy nuclear genes

Carl J. Rothfels, Fay-Wei Li, Erin M. Sigel, Layne Huiet, Anders Larsson, Dylan O. Burge, Markus Ruhsam, Michael Deyholos, Douglas E. Soltis, , Shane W. Shaw, Lisa Pokorny, Tao Chen, Claude DePamphilis, Lisa DeGironimo, Li Chen, Xiaofeng Wei, Xiao Sun, Petra Korall, Dennis W. Stevenson, Sean W. Graham, Gane Ka-Shu Wong, Kathleen M. Pryer, C. Neal Stewart, Gane K-S. Wong … & Claude De Pamphilis
Premise of the study: Understanding fern (monilophyte) phylogeny and its evolutionary timescale is critical for broad investigations of the evolution of land plants, and for providing the point of comparison necessary for studying the evolution of the fern sister group, seed plants. Molecular phylogenetic investigations have revolutionized our understanding of fern phylogeny, however, to date, these studies have relied almost exclusively on plastid data. Methods: Here we take a curated phylogenomics approach to infer the...

Data from: Elucidating steroid alkaloid biosynthesis in Veratrum californicum: production of verazine in Sf9 cells

Megan M. Augustin, Dan R. Ruzicka, Ashutosh K. Shukla, Courtney M. Starks, Mark O'Neil-Johnson, Michael R. McKain, Bradley S. Evans, Matthew D. Barrett, Ann Smithson, Gane Ka-Shu Wong, Michael K. Deyholos, Patrick P. Edger, J. Chris Pires, James H. Leebens-Mack, Dave A. Mann, Toni M. Kutchan & Matt D. Barrett
Steroid alkaloids have been shown to elicit a wide range of pharmacological effects that include anticancer and antifungal activities. Understanding the biosynthesis of these molecules is essential to bioengineering for sustainable production. Herein, we investigate the biosynthetic pathway to cyclopamine, a steroid alkaloid that shows promising antineoplastic activities. Supply of cyclopamine is limited, as the current source is solely derived from wild collection of the plant Veratrum californicum. To elucidate the early stages of the...

Data from: Temporal dynamics of linkage disequilibrium in two populations of bighorn sheep

Joshua M. Miller, Jocelyn Poissant, René M. Malenfant, John T. Hogg & David W. Coltman
Linkage disequilibrium (LD) is the nonrandom association of alleles at two markers. Patterns of LD have biological implications as well as practical ones when designing association studies or conservation programs aimed at identifying the genetic basis of fitness differences within and among populations. However, the temporal dynamics of LD in wild populations has received little empirical attention. In this study, we examined the overall extent of LD, the effect of sample size on the accuracy...

Data from: Phytochrome diversity in green plants and the origin of canonical plant phytochromes

Fay-Wei Li, Michael Melkonian, Carl J. Rothfels, Juan Carlos Villarreal, Dennis W. Stevenson, Sean W. Graham, Gane Ka-Shu Wong, Kathleen M. Pryer & Sarah Mathews
Phytochromes are red/far-red photoreceptors that play essential roles in diverse plant morphogenetic and physiological responses to light. Despite their functional significance, phytochrome diversity and evolution across photosynthetic eukaryotes remain poorly understood. Using newly available transcriptomic and genomic data we show that canonical plant phytochromes originated in a common ancestor of streptophytes (charophyte algae and land plants). Phytochromes in charophyte algae are structurally diverse, including canonical and non-canonical forms, whereas in land plants, phytochrome structure is...

Data from: Polygamy and an absence of fine-scale structure in Dendroctonus ponderosae (Hopk.) (Coleoptera: Curcilionidae) confirmed using molecular markers

Jasmine K. Janes, Amanda D. Roe, Adrianne V. Rice, Jamieson C. Gorrell, David W. Coltman, David W. Langor & Felix A. H. Sperling
An understanding of mating systems and fine-scale spatial genetic structure is required to effectively manage forest pest species such as Dendroctonus ponderosae (mountain pine beetle). Here we used genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphisms to assess the fine-scale genetic structure and mating system of D. ponderosae collected from a single stand in Alberta, Canada. Fine-scale spatial genetic structure was absent within the stand and the majority of genetic variation was best explained at the individual level. Relatedness estimates...

Data from: Edge influence on vegetation at natural and anthropogenic edges of boreal forests in Canada and Fennoscandia

Karen A. Harper, S. Ellen Macdonald, Michael S. Mayerhofer, Shekhar R. Biswas, Per-Anders Esseen, Kristoffer Hylander, Katherine J. Stewart, Azim U. Mallik, Pierre Drapeau, Bengt-Gunnar Jonsson, Daniel Lesieur, Jari Kouki & Yves Bergeron
1. Although anthropogenic edges are an important consequence of timber harvesting, edges due to natural disturbances or landscape heterogeneity are also common. Forest edges have been well-studied in temperate and tropical forests, but less so in less productive, disturbance-adapted boreal forests. 2. We synthesized data on forest vegetation at edges of boreal forests and compared edge influence among edge types (fire, cut, lake/wetland; old vs. young), forest types (broadleaf vs. coniferous) and geographic regions. Our...

Data from: Comparison of five methods for delimitating species in Ophion Fabricius, a diverse genus of parasitoid wasps (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae)

Marla D. Schwarzfeld, Felix A. H. Sperling & Felix A.H. Sperling
DNA taxonomy has been proposed as a method to quickly assess diversity and species limits in highly diverse, understudied taxa. Here we use five methods for species delimitation and two genetic markers (COI and ITS2) to assess species diversity within the parasitoid genus, Ophion. We searched for compensatory base changes (CBC’s) in ITS2, and determined that they are too rare to be of practical use in delimiting species in this genus. The other four methods...

Data from: Rapid increases in forest understory diversity and productivity following a mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) outbreak in pine forests

Gregory J. Pec, Justine Karst, Alexandra N. Sywenky, Paul W. Cigan, Nadir Erbilgin, Suzanne W. Simard, & James F. Cahill
The current unprecedented outbreak of mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) forests of western Canada has resulted in a landscape consisting of a mosaic of forest stands at different stages of mortality. Within forest stands, understory communities are the reservoir of the majority of plant species diversity and influence the composition of future forests in response to disturbance. Although changes to stand composition following beetle outbreaks are well documented, information on...

Data from: The nature of nurture in a wild mammal’s fitness

S. Eryn McFarlane, Jamieson C. Gorrell, David W. Coltman, Murray M. Humphries, Stan Boutin & Andrew G. McAdam
Genetic variation in fitness is required for the adaptive evolution of any trait but natural selection is thought to erode genetic variance in fitness. This paradox has motivated the search for mechanisms that might maintain a population's adaptive potential. Mothers make many contributions to the attributes of their developing offspring and these maternal effects can influence responses to natural selection if maternal effects are themselves heritable. Maternal genetic effects (MGEs) on fitness might, therefore, represent...

Data from: Prescribed fire does not promote outbreaks of a primary bark beetle at low-density populations

Crisia Alexandra Tabacaru, Jane Park & Nadir Erbilgin
The causes of bark beetle outbreaks – particularly the role of disturbances – are poorly understood. Stand-scale disturbances, like fires, can suddenly improve local host susceptibility and may attract beetles; however, whether such increases can lead to outbreaks in post-disturbance stands is unclear. Using low-density Dendroctonus ponderosae mountain pine beetle populations in Pinus contorta lodgepole pine forests in western Canada, we investigated whether prescribed fires promote outbreaks or provide only short-term resources. Proportionally more burned...

Data from: Biotic and climatic velocity identify contrasting areas of vulnerability to climate change

Carlos Carroll, Joshua J. Lawler, David R. Roberts & Andreas Hamann
Metrics that synthesize the complex effects of climate change are essential tools for mapping future threats to biodiversity and predicting which species are likely to adapt in place to new climatic conditions, disperse and establish in areas with newly suitable climate, or face the prospect of extirpation. The most commonly used of such metrics is the velocity of climate change, which estimates the speed at which species must migrate over the earth’s surface to maintain...

Data from: Nutrient foraging behaviour of four co-occuring perennial grassland plant species alone does not predict behaviour with neighbours

Gordon G. McNickle, Michael K. Deyholos, & James F. Cahill
The spatial arrangement of nutrients and neighbours in soil influences plant growth and reproduction. Plants often respond to such stimuli through plasticity in root proliferation (root mass per soil volume), or the breadth of their root system. Here, we asked how plants adjust nutrient foraging strategies when grown alone or with neighbours. We asked (i) Does root proliferation into nutrient-rich patches when plants are grown alone predict root proliferation when plants are grown with neighbours?...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    28

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    28

Affiliations

  • University of Alberta
    28
  • University of British Columbia
    6
  • Duke University
    3
  • University of California, Berkeley
    3
  • University of Florida
    3
  • The Bronx Defenders
    2
  • University of Washington
    2
  • Princeton University
    2
  • University of Cologne
    2
  • University of Camerino
    1