33 Works

Data from: Intense selective hunting leads to artificial evolution in horn size

Gabriel Pigeon, Marco Festa-Bianchet, David W. Coltman & Fanie Pelletier
The potential for selective harvests to induce rapid evolutionary change is an important question for conservation and evolutionary biology, with numerous biological, social and economic implications. We analyze 39 years of phenotypic data on horn size in bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) subject to intense trophy hunting for 23 years, after which harvests nearly ceased. Our analyses revealed a significant decline in genetic value for horn length of rams, consistent with an evolutionary response to artificial...

Data from: Paternal reproductive success drives sex allocation in a wild mammal

Mathieu Douhard, Marco Festa-Bianchet, Dave W. Coltman, Fanie Pelletier & David W. Coltman
Parents should bias sex allocation toward offspring of the sex most likely to provide higher fitness returns. Trivers and Willard proposed that for polygynous mammals, females should adjust sex-ratio at conception or bias allocation of resources toward the most profitable sex, according to their own body condition. However, the possibility that mammalian fathers may influence sex allocation has seldom been considered. Here, we show that the probability of having a son increased from 0.31 to...

Data from: The role of cell replacement in benthic–pelagic coupling by suspension feeders

Amanda S. Kahn & Sally P. Leys
Benthic–pelagic coupling through suspension feeders and their detrital pathways is integral to carbon transport in oceans. In food-poor ecosystems however, a novel mechanism of carbon recycling has been proposed that involves direct uptake of dissolved carbon by suspension feeders followed by shedding of cells as particulate carbon. We studied cell replacement rates in a range of cold-water sponge species to determine how universal this mechanism might be. We show that cell replacement rates of feeding...

Data from: Environmental and evolutionary effects on horn growth of male bighorn sheep

Mathieu Douhard, Gabriel Pigeon, Marco Festa-Bianchet, Dave W. Coltmann, Simon Guillemette, Fanie Pelletier & David W. Coltman
The development of male secondary sexual characters such as antlers or horns has substantial biological and socio-economic importance because in many species these traits affect male fitness positively through sexual selection and negatively through trophy hunting. Both environmental conditions and selective hunting can affect horn growth but their relative importance remains unexplored. We first examined how a large-scale climate index, the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), local weather and population density influenced both absolute and relative...

Data from: Demographic drivers of age-dependent sexual selection

Alexandre M. Martin, Marco Festa-Bianchet, David W. Coltman & Fanie Pelletier
Sexual selection has a critical role in evolution, and it is fundamental to identify what ecological factors drive its variation. Disentangling the ecological correlates of sexual selection over the long term, however, is challenging and has rarely been done in nature. We sought to assess how demographic changes influenced the intensity, direction and form of sexual selection and whether selective pressures varied with age. We tested whether breeder sex ratio, number of competitors and age...

Data from: Host phenology and potential saprotrophism of ectomycorrhizal fungi in the boreal forest

Stefan F. Hupperts, Justine Karst, Karin Pritsch & Simon M. Landhäusser
Phenology-induced changes in carbon assimilation by trees may affect carbon stored in fine roots and as a consequence, alter carbon allocated to ectomycorrhizal fungi. Two competing models exist to explain carbon mobilization by ectomycorrhizal fungi. Under the ‘saprotrophy model’, decreased allocation of carbon may induce saprotrophic behaviour in ectomycorrhizal fungi, resulting in the decomposition of organic matter to mobilize carbon. Alternatively, under the ‘nutrient acquisition model’, decomposition may instead be driven by the acquisition of...

Data from: Pivotal effect of early-winter temperatures and snowfall on population growth of alpine Parnassius smintheus butterflies

Jens Roland & Stephen F. Matter
Geographic range shifts in species’ distributions, due to climate change, imply altered dynamics at both their northern and southern range limits, or at upper and lower elevational limits. There is therefore a need to identify specific weather or climate variable(s), and life stages or cohorts on which they act, and how these affect population growth. Identifying such variables permits prediction of population increase or decline under a changing climate, and shifts in a species’ geographic...

Data from: Assessing polar bear (Ursus maritimus) population structure in the Hudson Bay region using SNPs

Michelle Viengkone, Andrew Edward Derocher, Evan Shaun Richardson, René Michael Malenfant, Joshua Moses Miller, Martyn E. Obbard, Markus G. Dyck, Nick J. Lunn, Vicki Sahanatien & Corey S. Davis
Defining subpopulations using genetics has traditionally used data from microsatellite markers to investigate population structure; however, single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have emerged as a tool for detection of fine-scale structure. In Hudson Bay, Canada, three polar bear (Ursus maritimus) subpopulations (Foxe Basin (FB), Southern Hudson Bay (SH), and Western Hudson Bay (WH)) have been delineated based on mark–recapture studies, radiotelemetry and satellite telemetry, return of marked animals in the subsistence harvest, and population genetics using microsatellites....

Data from: Fungal effects on plant-plant interactions contribute to grassland plant abundances: evidence from the field

Jonathan A. Bennett & James F. Cahill
1. Plant-fungal interactions can have strong effects on plant abundances, both through direct effects on plant performance and indirect effects on competition and facilitation. Most evidence linking fungi to plant abundances derives from direct fungal effects on initial growth, with little evidence linking fungal effects on plant-plant interactions in intact communities to plant abundances for any plant life history stage. 2. We transplanted 4320 individuals belonging to 18 plant species into plots where we removed...

Data from: Miocene flooding events of western Amazonia

Carlos Jaramillo, Ingrid Romero, Carlos D'Apolito, German Bayona, Edward Duarte, Stephen Louwye, Jaime Escobar, Javier Luque, Jorge D. Carrillo-Briceño, Vladimir Zapata, Andrés Mora, Stefan Schouten, Michael Zavada, Guy Harrington, John Ortiz & Frank P. Wesselingh
There is a considerable controversy about whether western Amazonia was ever covered by marine waters during the Miocene [23 to 5 Ma (million years ago)]. We investigated the possible occurrence of Miocene marine incursions in the Llanos and Amazonas/Solimões basins, using sedimentological and palynological data from two sediment cores taken in eastern Colombia and northwestern Brazil together with seismic information. We observed two distinct marine intervals in the Llanos Basin, an early Miocene that lasted...

Data from: Gα and regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) protein pairs maintain functional compatibility and conserved interaction interfaces throughout evolution despite frequent loss of RGS proteins in plants

Dieter Hackenberg, Michael McKain, Soon-Goo Lee, Swarup Roy Choudhury, Tyler McCann, Spencer Schreier, Alex Harkess, J. Chris Pires, Gane Ka-Shu Wong, Joseph Jez, Elizabeth Kellogg, Sona Pandey, Soon Goo Lee, Joseph M. Jez, Michael R. McKain & Elizabeth A. Kellogg
Signaling pathways regulated by heterotrimeric G-proteins exist in all eukaryotes. The regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) proteins are key interactors and critical modulators of the Gα protein of the heterotrimer. However, while G-proteins are widespread in plants, RGS proteins have been reported to be missing from the entire monocot lineage, with two exceptions. A single amino acid substitution-based adaptive coevolution of the Gα:RGS proteins was proposed to enable the loss of RGS in monocots. We...

Data from: Cross-generational effects of male reproductive success and offspring immunocompetence in Drosophila melanogaster

Ashley Guncay, Thiropa Balasubramaniam, Katie Plagens, Joel T. Weadge, Tristan A. F. Long, Joel Weadge & Tristan A.F. Long
In some species where males make no direct contribution to a female’s lifetime reproductive success, females choose mates based on the indirect benefits manifested in their offspring. One trait that may be subject to this sexual selection is immunocompetence (the ability to mount an immune response following exposure to pathogens); however, the results of previous work on its link to male attractiveness have been ambiguous. Herein we examine the life history consequences of mating with...

Data from: Biomass resilience of Neotropical secondary forests

Lourens Poorter, Frans Bongers, T. Mitchell Aide, Angélica M. Almeyda Zambrano, Patricia Balvanera, Justin M. Becknell, Vanessa Boukili, Pedro H. S. Brancalion, Eben N. Broadbent, Robin L. Chazdon, Dylan Craven, Jarcilene S. De Almeida-Cortez, George A. L. Cabral, Ben H. J. De Jong, Julie S. Denslow, Daisy H. Dent, Saara J. DeWalt, Juan M. Dupuy, Sandra M. Durán, Mario M. Espírito-Santo, María C. Fandino, Ricardo G. César, Jefferson S. Hall, José Luis Hernandez-Stefanoni, Catarina C. Jakovac … & Danaë M. A. Rozendaal
Land-use change occurs nowhere more rapidly than in the tropics, where the imbalance between deforestation and forest regrowth has large consequences for the global carbon cycle1. However, considerable uncertainty remains about the rate of biomass recovery in secondary forests, and how these rates are influenced by climate, landscape, and prior land use2, 3, 4. Here we analyse aboveground biomass recovery during secondary succession in 45 forest sites and about 1,500 forest plots covering the major...

Data from: Energy benefits and emergent space use patterns of an empirically parameterized model of memory-based patch selection

Jerod A. Merkle, Jonathan R. Potts & Daniel Fortin
Many species frequently return to previously visited foraging sites. This bias towards familiar areas suggests that remembering information from past experience is beneficial. Such a memory-based foraging strategy has also been hypothesized to give rise to restricted space use (i.e. a home range). Nonetheless, the benefits of empirically derived memory-based foraging tactics and the extent to which they give rise to restricted space use patterns are still relatively unknown. Using a combination of stochastic agent-based...

Data from: MycoDB, a global database of plant response to mycorrhizal fungi

V. Bala Chaudhary, Megan A. Rúa, Anita Antoninka, James D. Bever, Jeffery Cannon, Ashley Craig, Jessica Duchicela, Alicia Frame, Monique Gardes, Catherine Gehring, Michelle Ha, Miranda Hart, Jacob Hopkins, Baoming Ji, Nancy Collins Johnson, Wittaya Kaonongbua, Justine Karst, Roger T. Koide, Louis J. Lamit, James Meadow, Brook G. Milligan, John C. Moore, , Bridget Piculell, Blake Ramsby … & Jason D. Hoeksema
Plants form belowground associations with mycorrhizal fungi in one of the most common symbioses on Earth. However, few large-scale generalizations exist for the structure and function of mycorrhizal symbioses, as the nature of this relationship varies from mutualistic to parasitic and is largely context-dependent. We announce the public release of MycoDB, a database of 4,010 studies (from 438 unique publications) to aid in multi-factor meta-analyses elucidating the ecological and evolutionary context in which mycorrhizal fungi...

Data from: Faster and farther: wolf movement on linear features and implications for hunting behaviour

Melanie Dickie, Robert Serrouya, R. Scott McNay & Stan Boutin
Predation by grey wolves Canis lupus has been identified as an important cause of boreal woodland caribou Rangifer tarandus caribou mortality, and it has been hypothesized that wolf use of human-created linear features such as seismic lines, pipelines and roads increases movement, resulting in higher kill rates. We tested if wolves select linear features and whether movement rates increased while travelling on linear features in north-eastern Alberta and north-western Saskatchewan using 5-min GPS (Global Positioning...

Data from: Ten-year responses of ground-dwelling spiders to retention harvest in the boreal forest

Jaime Pinzon, John R. Spence, David W. Langor & David P. Shorthouse
The Ecosystem Management Emulating Natural Disturbances (EMEND) project tests the hypothesis that varying levels of green tree retention maintain and retain forest biodiversity better than conventional clear-cutting. We studied epigaeic spiders to assess biodiversity changes two, five and ten years following a range of partial retention harvests (clear-cut, 10-75% retention) and unharvested controls in four boreal mixedwood cover-types. A total of 56, 371 adult spiders representing 220 species was collected using pitfall traps. Lasting effects...

Data from: Predictive modeling of ecological patterns along linear-feature networks

Andrew Ladle, Tal Avgar, Matthew Wheatley & Mark S. Boyce
Ecological patterns and processes often take place within linear-feature networks, and this has implications when analysing the spatial configuration of such patterns or processes across a landscape. One such pattern is the use of landscapes by human recreationists: an important variable in animal habitat selection and behaviour. Due to the difficulty in obtaining data, ecologists tend to use coarse metrics such as linear-feature density, while the extent and timing of human activity are often ignored....

Data from: Cross-validation strategies for data with temporal, spatial, hierarchical, or phylogenetic structure

David R. Roberts, Volker Bahn, Simone Ciuti, Mark S. Boyce, Jane Elith, Gurutzeta Guillera-Arroita, Severin Hauenstein, José J. Lahoz-Monfort, Boris Schröder, Wilfried Thuiller, David I. Warton, Brendan A. Wintle, Florian Hartig & Carsten F. Dormann
Ecological data often show temporal, spatial, hierarchical (random effects), or phylogenetic structure. Modern statistical approaches are increasingly accounting for such dependencies. However, when performing cross-validation, these structures are regularly ignored, resulting in serious underestimation of predictive error. One cause for the poor performance of uncorrected (random) cross-validation, noted often by modellers, are dependence structures in the data that persist as dependence structures in model residuals, violating the assumption of independence. Even more concerning, because often...

Data from: Forbidden fruit: human settlement and abundant fruit create an ecological trap for an apex omnivore

Clayton T. Lamb, Garth Mowat, Bruce N. McLellan, Scott E. Nielsen & Stan Boutin
Habitat choice is an evolutionary product of animals experiencing increased fitness when preferentially occupying high-quality habitat. However, an ecological trap (ET) can occur when an animal is presented with novel conditions and the animal's assessment of habitat quality is poorly matched to its resulting fitness. We tested for an ET for grizzly (brown) bears using demographic and movement data collected in an area with rich food resources and concentrated human settlement. We derived measures of...

Data from: The first iguanian lizard from the Mesozoic of Africa

Sebastian Apesteguía, Juan D. Daza, Tiago R. Rodrigues Simões & Jean Claude Rage
The fossil record shows that iguanian lizards were widely distributed during the Late Cretaceous. However, the biogeographic history and early evolution of one of its most diverse and peculiar clades (acrodontans) remain poorly known. Here, we present the first Mesozoic acrodontan from Africa, which also represents the oldest iguanian lizard from that continent. The new taxon comes from the Kem Kem Beds in Morocco (Cenomanian, Late Cretaceous) and is based on a partial lower jaw....

Data from: Landscape connectivity predicts chronic wasting disease risk in Canada

Barry R. Nobert, Evelyn H. Merrill, Margo J. Pybus, Trent K. Bollinger & Yeen Ten Hwang
Predicting the spatial pattern of disease risk in wild animal populations is important for implementing effective control programmes. We developed a risk model predicting the probability that a deer harvested in a wild population was chronic wasting disease positive (CWD+) and evaluated the importance of landscape connectivity based on deer movements. We quantified landscape connectivity from deer ‘resistance’ to move across the landscape similar to the flow of electrical current across a hypothetical electronic circuit....

Data from: Adaptive and neutral markers both show continent-wide population structure of mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae)

Philip D. Batista, Jasmine K. Janes, Celia K. Boone, Brent W. Murray & Felix A. H. Sperling
Assessments of population genetic structure and demographic history have traditionally been based on neutral markers while explicitly excluding adaptive markers. In this study, we compared the utility of putatively adaptive and neutral single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for inferring mountain pine beetle population structure across its geographic range. Both adaptive and neutral SNPs, and their combination, allowed range-wide structure to be distinguished and delimited a population that has recently undergone range expansion across northern British Columbia and...

Data from: Stand structural diversity rather than species diversity enhances aboveground carbon storage in secondary subtropical forests in Eastern China

Arshad Ali, En-Rong Yan, Han Y. H. Chen, Scott X. Chang, Yan-Tao Zhao, Xiao-Dong Yang & Ming-Shan Xu
Stand structural diversity, typically characterized by variances in tree diameter at breast height (DBH) and total height, plays a critical role in influencing aboveground carbon (C) storage. However, few studies have considered the multivariate relationships of aboveground C storage with stand age, stand structural diversity, and species diversity in natural forests. In this study, aboveground C storage, stand age, tree species, DBH and height diversity indices, were determined across 80 subtropical forest plots in Eastern...

Data from: Genome-wide set of SNPs reveals evidence for two glacial refugia and admixture from postglacial recolonization in an alpine ungulate

Zijian Sim, Jocelyn C. Hall, Bill Jex, Troy M. Hegel & David W. Coltman
Past glaciation events have played a major role in shaping the genetic diversity and distribution of wild sheep in North America. The advancement of glaciers can isolate populations in ice-free refugia, where they can survive until the recession of ice sheets. The major Beringian refugium is thought to have held thinhorn sheep (Ovis dalli) populations during times of glacial advance. While isolation in the major refugium can account for much of the genetic and morphological...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    33

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    33

Affiliations

  • University of Alberta
    33
  • Université de Sherbrooke
    4
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    3
  • University of Georgia
    2
  • Donald Danforth Plant Science Center
    1
  • University of Kansas
    1
  • Michigan Technological University
    1
  • King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi
    1
  • California State University, Northridge
    1
  • Government of Alberta
    1