101 Works

Cost-effectiveness analysis of telerehabilitation for people who have sustained a stroke with return home without intensive rehabilitation: A systematic review

Lucien P. Coulibaly, Christian Rochefort, Dahlia Kairy & Michel Tousignant

Det tør!: Frozen-Ground Cartoons; Et international samarbejde mellem kunstnere og permafrostforskere

Heta Nääs, Noémie Ross, Frédéric Bouchard, Michelle Paquette, Audrey Veillette, Michael Fritz, Stefanie Weege, Julie Malenfant-Lepage, Bethany Deshpande, Alexander Nieuwendam, Ashley Rudy, Matthias Siewert, Ylva Sjöberg, Jonathan Harbor, J. Otto Habeck, Kerstin Krøier Rasmussen & Kirstey Langley
This project started in October 2015 with a crazy idea : prepare and submit a funding application for an international, multidisciplinary and non-traditional scientific outreach project… within the next 48 hours. Well, it worked out. A group of highly motivated young researchers from Canada and Europe united to combine arts and science and produce a series of outreach comic strips about permafrost (frozen ground). The aim of the project is to present and explain scientific...

Décentralisation au Cameroun : quelle place pour la gouvernance urbaine ?

Francis Joël Tchenkeu & Michel Max Raynaud

Data from: A scenario for the evolution of selective egg colouration: the roles of enemy-free space, camouflage, thermoregulation, and pigment limitation

Inmaculada Torres-Campos, Paul K. Abram, Eric Guerra-Grenier, Guy Boivin & Jacques Brodeur
Behavioural plasticity can drive the evolution of new traits in animals. In oviparous species, plasticity in oviposition behaviour could promote the evolution of new egg traits by exposing them to different selective pressures in novel oviposition sites. Individual females of the predatory stink bug Podisus maculiventris are able to selectively colour their eggs depending on leaf side, laying lightly pigmented eggs on leaf undersides and more pigmented eggs, which are more resistant to ultraviolet (UV)...

Data from: Frequency-dependent conspecific attraction to food patches

Guy Beauchamp & Graeme D. Ruxton
In many ecological situations, resources are difficult to find but become more apparent to nearby searchers after one of their numbers discovers and begins to exploit them. If the discoverer cannot monopolize the resources, then others may benefit from joining the discoverer and sharing their discovery. Existing theories for this type of conspecific attraction have often used very simple rules for how the decision to join a discovered resource patch should be influenced by the...

Data from: Consensus RDA across dissimilarity coefficients for canonical ordination of community composition data

F. Guillaume Blanchet, Pierre Legendre, J. A. Colin Bergeron & Fangliang He
Understanding how habitat structures species assemblages in a community is one of the main goals of community ecology. To relate community patterns to particular factors defining habitat conditions, ecologists often use canonical ordinations such as canonical redundancy analysis (RDA). It is a common practice to use dissimilarity coefficients to perform canonical ordinations through distance-based RDA (db-RDA) or transformation-based RDA (tb-RDA). Dissimilarity coefficients are measures of resemblance where the information about species communities is condensed into...

Data from: Leaf nutrients, not specific leaf area, are consistent indicators of elevated nutrient inputs

Jennifer Firn, James M. McGree, Eric Harvey, Habacuc Flores-Moreno, Martin Schütz, Yvonne M. Buckley, Elizabeth T. Borer, Eric W. Seabloom, Kimberly J. La Pierre, Andrew M. MacDougall, Suzanne M. Prober, Carly J. Stevens, Lauren L. Sullivan, Erica Porter, Emma Ladouceur, Charlotte Allen, Karine H. Moromizato, John W. Morgan, W. Stanley Harpole, Yann Hautier, Nico Eisenhauer, Justin P. Wright, Peter B. Adler, Carlos Alberto Arnillas, Jonathan D. Bakker … & Anita C. Risch
Leaf traits are frequently measured in ecology to provide a ‘common currency’ for predicting how anthropogenic pressures impact ecosystem function. Here, we test whether leaf traits consistently respond to experimental treatments across 27 globally distributed grassland sites across 4 continents. We find that specific leaf area (leaf area per unit mass)—a commonly measured morphological trait inferring shifts between plant growth strategies—did not respond to up to four years of soil nutrient additions. Leaf nitrogen, phosphorus...

Data from: Multiple pairwise analysis of non-homologous centromere coupling reveals preferential chromosome size-dependent interactions and a role for bouquet formation in establishing the interaction pattern

Philippe Lefrançois, Beth Rockmill, Pingxing Xie, G. Shirleen Roeder & Michael Snyder
During meiosis, chromosomes undergo a homology search in order to locate their homolog to form stable pairs and exchange genetic material. Early in prophase, chromosomes associate in mostly non-homologous pairs, tethered only at their centromeres. This phenomenon, conserved through higher eukaryotes, is termed centromere coupling in budding yeast. Both initiation of recombination and the presence of homologs are dispensable for centromere coupling (occurring in spo11 mutants and haploids induced to undergo meiosis) but the presence...

Data from: NREM2 and sleep spindles are instrumental to the consolidation of motor sequence memories

Samuel Laventure, Stuart Fogel, Ovidiu Lungu, Geneviève Albouy, Pénélope Sévigny-Dupont, Catherine Vien, Chadi Sayour, Julie Carrier, Habib Benali & Julien Doyon
Although numerous studies have convincingly demonstrated that sleep plays a critical role in motor sequence learning (MSL) consolidation, the specific contribution of the different sleep stages in this type of memory consolidation is still contentious. To probe the role of stage 2 non-REM sleep (NREM2) in this process, we used a conditioning protocol in three different groups of participants who either received an odor during initial training on a motor sequence learning task and were...

Data from: Ecological selection of siderophore-producing microbial taxa in response to heavy metal contamination

Elze Hesse, Siobhan O'Brien, Nicolas Tromas, Florian Bayer, Adela M. Lujan, Eleanor M. Van Veen, Dave J. Hodgson & Angus Buckling
Some microbial public goods can provide both individual and community-wide benefits, and are open to exploitation by non-producing species. One such example is the production of metal-detoxifying siderophores. Here, we investigate whether conflicting selection pressures on siderophore production by heavy metals – a detoxifying effect of siderophores, and exploitation of this detoxifying effect – results in a net increase or decrease. We show that the proportion of siderophore-producing taxa increases along a natural heavy metal...

Data from: paco: implementing Procrustean Approach to Cophylogeny in R

Matthew C. Hutchinson, Edgar Fernando Cagua, Juan A. Balbuena, Daniel B. Stouffer & Timothée Poisot
1. The concordance of evolutionary histories and extant species interactions provides a useful metric for addressing questions of how the structure of ecological communities is influenced by macro-evolutionary processes. 2. We introduce paco (v.0.3.1), an R package to perform Procrustean Approach to Cophylogeny. This method assesses the phylogenetic congruence, or evolutionary dependence, of two groups of interacting species using both ecological interaction networks and their phylogenetic history. 3. We demonstrate the functionality of paco through...

Data from: Selective disappearance of individuals with high levels of glycated haemoglobin in a free-living bird

Charlotte Récapet, Adélaïde Sibeaux, Laure Cauchard, Blandine Doligez & Pierre Bize
Although disruption of glucose homeostasis is a hallmark of ageing in humans and laboratory model organisms, we have little information on the importance of this process in free-living animals. Poor control of blood glucose levels leads to irreversible protein glycation. Hence, levels of protein glycation are hypothesized to increase with age and to be associated with a decline in survival. We tested these predictions by measuring blood glycated haemoglobin in 274 adult collared flycatchers of...

Data from: A new subfamily classification of the Leguminosae based on a taxonomically comprehensive phylogeny

, Anne Bruneau, Nasim Azani, Marielle Babineau, Edeline Gagnon, Carole Sinou, Royce Steeves, Erin Zimmerman, C. Donovan Bailey, Lynsey Kovar, Madhugiri Nageswara-Rao, Hannah Banks, RuthP. Clark, Manuel De La Estrella, Peter Gasson, GeoffreyC. Kite, BenteB. Klitgaard, GwilymP. Lewis, Danilo Neves, Gerhard Prenner, María De Lourdes Rico-Arce, ArianeR. Barbosa, Maria Cristina López-Roberts, Luciano Paganucci De Queiroz, PétalaG. Ribeiro … & Tingshuang Yi
The classification of the legume family proposed here addresses the long-known non-monophyly of the traditionally recognised subfamily Caesalpinioideae, by recognising six robustly supported monophyletic subfamilies. This new classification uses as its framework the most comprehensive phylogenetic analyses of legumes to date, based on plastid matK gene sequences, and including near-complete sampling of genera (698 of the currently recognised 765 genera) and ca. 20% (3696) of known species. The matK gene region has been the most...

Data from: A shift from phenol to silica-based leaf defenses during long-term soil and ecosystem development

Félix De Tombeur, Etienne Laliberté, Hans Lambers, Michel-Pierre Faucon, Graham Zemunik, Benjamin Turner, Jean-Thomas Cornélis & Grégory Mahy
The resource availability hypothesis predicts that plants adapted to infertile soils have high levels of anti-herbivore leaf defenses. This hypothesis has been mostly explored for secondary metabolites such as phenolics, while it remains underexplored for silica-based defenses. We determined leaf concentrations of total phenols and silicon (Si) in plants growing along the 2-million-year Jurien Bay chronosequence, exhibiting an extreme gradient of soil fertility. We found that nitrogen (N) limitation on young soils led to a...

Data from: Examining the dynamics of Epstein-Barr virus shedding in the tonsils and the impact of HIV-1 coinfection on daily saliva viral loads

Catherine Byrne, Christine Johnston, Jackson Orem, Fred Okuku, Meei-Li Huang, Habibur Rahman, Anna Wald, Lawrence Corey, Joshua Schiffer, Corey Casper, Daniel Coombs & Soren Gantt
Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is transmitted by saliva and is a major cause of cancer, particularly in people living with HIV/AIDS. Here, we describe the frequency and quantity of EBV detection in the saliva of Ugandan adults with and without HIV-1 infection and use these data to develop a novel mathematical model of EBV infection in the tonsils. Eligible cohort participants were not taking antiviral medications, and those with HIV-1 infection had a CD4 count >200...

Data from: Consequences of multiple simultaneous opportunities to exploit others’ efforts on free riding

Frédérique Dubois & Étienne Richard-Dionne
Individuals within a group do not all act in the same way: typically the investors (or producers) put efforts into producing resources while the free riders (or scroungers) benefit from these resources without contributing. In behavioural ecology, the prevalence of free riders can be predicted by a well-known game-theoretical model -the Producer-Scrounger (PS) model- where group members have the options to either search for resources (producers) or exploit the efforts of others (scroungers). The PS...

Exploring the interplay between natural and intersexual selection on the evolution of a cognitive trait

Marie Barou-Dagues & Frédérique Dubois
There has been an increased focus on the role of natural and sexual selection in shaping cognitive abilities, but the importance of the interaction between both forces remain largely unknown. Intersexual selection through female mate choice might be an important driver of the evolution of cognitive traits, especially in monogamous species, where females may obtain direct fitness benefits by choosing mates with better cognitive abilities. However, the importance given by females to male cognitive traits...

Data from: Host nutritional status mediates degree of parasitoid virulence

Fanny Maure, Frédéric Thomas, Josée Doyon & Jacques Brodeur
Parasitic organisms rely on the resources of their hosts to obtain nutrients essential for growth and reproduction. Insect parasitoids constitute an extreme condition since they develop in a single host from which they typically consume all available resources. As a result, the host is killed following parasitism. However, a few intriguing cases of host survival have been reported wherein hosts resume foraging and may even reproduce following parasitoid emergence. Yet, the ultimate and proximate mechanisms...

Data from: Network structure and local adaptation in coevolving bacteria-phage interactions

James Gurney, Lafi Aldakak, Alex Betts, Claire Gougat-Barbera, Timothée Poisot, Oliver Kaltz & Michael E. Hochberg
Numerous theoretical and experimental studies have investigated antagonistic coevolution between parasites and their hosts. Although experimental tests of theory from a range of biological systems are largely concordant regarding the influence of several driving processes, we know little as to how mechanisms acting at the smallest scales (individual molecular and phenotypic changes) may result in the emergence of structures at larger scales, such as coevolutionary dynamics and local adaptation. We capitalized on methods commonly employed...

Data from: Interaction between the oculomotor and postural systems during a dual-task: compensatory reductions in head sway following visually-induced postural perturbations promote the production of accurate double-step saccades in standing human adults

Mathieu Boulanger, Guillaume Giraudet & Jocelyn Faubert
Humans routinely scan their environment for useful information using saccadic eye movements and/or coordinated movements of the eyes and other body segments such the head and the torso. Most previous eye movement studies were conducted with seated subject and showed that single saccades and sequences of saccades (e.g. double-step saccades) made to briefly flashed stimuli were equally accurate and precise. As one can easily appreciate, most gaze shifts performed daily by a given person are...

Data from: Why migrate during the day: a comparative analysis of North American birds

Guy Beauchamp
Migration can take place primarily during the day, or at night, or during both depending on the species. Why the timing of migration varies among species has been the object of much research but the underlying ecological processes are still unclear. Proximally, migration timing may be influenced by the timing of other activities or may be more prevalent in species that migrate over long distances. Adaptive scenarios emphasize the reduction in flight costs at night...

Data from: Cardiac vagal dysfunction moderates patterns of craving across the day in moderate to heavy consumers of alcohol

Rhiannon E. Mayhugh, Paul J. Laurienti, Jason Fanning, Lise Gauvin, Keri J. Heilman, Stephen W. Porges & W. Jack Rejeski
Background: Alcohol craving, a known correlate of vulnerability to Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD), has been found to be inversely related to cardiac vagal tone (CVT). Here we examine how resting CVT, CVT reactivity to a postural challenge, and their interaction influence craving during imposed alcohol abstinence and their usual drinking among moderate to heavy drinkers. Methods: Participants were recruited from the local community (final n=29) and assessed for CVT functioning via respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA)...

Data from: The role of predators in maintaining the geographic organization of aposematic signals

Mathieu Chouteau & Bernard Angers
Selective predation of aposematic signals is expected to promote phenotypic uniformity. But while uniform within a population, numerous species display impressive variations in warning signals among adjacent populations. Predators from different localities learning to avoid distinct signals while performing intense selection on others are thus expected to maintain such a geographic organization. We tested this assumption by placing clay frog models, representing distinct color morphs of the Peruvian poison-dart frog Ranitomeya imitator and a non...

Data from: Social foragers adopt a riskier foraging mode in the centre of their groups

Guy Beauchamp
Foraging in groups provides many benefits that are not necessarily experienced the same way by all individuals. I explore the possibility that foraging mode, the way individuals exploit resources, varies as a function of spatial position in the group, reflecting commonly occurring spatial differences in predation risk. I show that semipalmated sandpipers (Calidris pusilla), a social foraging avian species, tended to adopt a riskier foraging mode in the central, more protected areas of their groups....

Data from: Plant-soil feedback and the maintenance of diversity in Mediterranean-climate shrublands

Francois P. Teste, Paul Kardol, Benjamin L. Turner, David A. Wardle, Graham Zemunik, Michael Renton & Etienne Laliberté
Soil biota influence plant performance through plant-soil feedback, but it is unclear whether the strength of such feedback depends on plant traits and whether plant-soil feedback drives local plant diversity. We grew 16 co-occurring plant species with contrasting nutrient-acquisition strategies from hyperdiverse Australian shrublands and exposed them to soil biota from under their own or other plant species. Plant responses to soil biota varied according to their nutrient-acquisition strategy, including positive feedback for ectomycorrhizal plants...

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