31 Works

Data from: Food availability modulates differences in parental effort between dispersing and philopatric birds

Charlotte Récapet, Pierre Bize & Blandine Doligez
Dispersal entails costs and might have to be traded off against other life-history traits. Dispersing and philopatric individuals may thus exhibit alternative life-history strategies. Importantly, these differences could also partly be modulated by environmental variation. Our previous results in a patchy population of a small passerine, the collared flycatcher, suggest that, as breeding density, a proxy of habitat quality, decreases, dispersing individuals invest less in reproduction but maintain a stable oxidative balance, whereas philopatric individuals...

Data from: Do group dynamics affect colour morph clines during a range shift?

Lesley T. Lancaster, Rachael Y. Dudaniec, Bengt Hansson & Erik I. Svensson
Species exhibiting colour-polymorphism are thought to have an ecological advantage at the landscape scale, because spatial segregation of alternatively-adapted ecotypes into diverse habitats can increase the total species’ niche breadth and thus confer greater geographic range size. However, morph frequencies are also influenced by intra-populational processes such as frequency- or density-dependent social interactions. To identify how social feedback may affect clinal variation in morph frequencies, we investigated reciprocal interactions between morph-specific thermal tolerance, local climatic...

Stable water isotopes in Western Siberian inland waters

P. Ala-Aho, C. Soulsby, O.S. Pokrovsky, S.N. Kirpotin, J. Karlsson, S. Serikova, R. Manasypov, A. Lim, I. Krickov, S.N. Vorobyev, L.G. Kolesnichenko, S. Loiko & D. Tetzlaff
The data consist of stable water isotope composition in the rivers , lakes, soils and flooded areas in the Western Siberia Lowlands (WSL). Sampling area encompassed a 1700 km south-north transect spanning from approx. 56°N to 68°N in latitude and 74°E to 84°E in longitude. Samples were collected during multiple field campaigns between February 2014 and November 2016. The dataset in produced as a part of the JPI/NERC funded SIWA project "Climate impact on the...

Data from: Impact of wild prey availability on livestock predation by snow leopards

Kulbhushansingh R. Suryawanshi, Stephen M. Redpath, Yash Veer Bhatnagar, Uma Ramakrishnan, Vaibhav Chaturvedi, Sophie C. Smout & Charudutt Mishra
An increasing proportion of the world's poor is rearing livestock today, and the global livestock population is growing. Livestock predation by large carnivores and their retaliatory killing is becoming an economic and conservation concern. A common recommendation for carnivore conservation and for reducing predation on livestock is to increase wild prey populations based on the assumption that the carnivores will consume this alternative food. Livestock predation, however, could either reduce or intensify with increases in...

Data from: Responses of bottlenose dolphins and harbor porpoises to impact and vibration piling noise during harbor construction

Isla M. Graham, Enrico Pirotta, Nathan D. Merchant, Adrian Farcas, Tim R. Barton, Barbara Cheney, Gordon D. Hastie & Paul M. Thompson
The development of risk assessments for the exposure of protected populations to noise from coastal construction is constrained by uncertainty over the nature and extent of marine mammal responses to man-made noise. Stakeholder concern often focuses on the potential for local displacement caused by impact piling, where piles are hammered into the seabed. To mitigate this threat, use of vibration piling, where piles are shaken into place with a vibratory hammer, is often encouraged due...

Data from: Pedigree-based inbreeding coefficient explains more variation in fitness than heterozygosity at 160 microsatellites in a wild bird population

Pirmin Nietlisbach, Lukas F. Keller, Glauco Camenisch, Frédéric Guillaume, Peter Arcese, Jane M. Reid & Erik Postma
Although the pedigree-based inbreeding coefficient F predicts the expected proportion of an individual's genome that is identical-by-descent (IBD), heterozygosity at genetic markers captures Mendelian sampling variation and thereby provides an estimate of realized IBD. Realized IBD should hence explain more variation in fitness than their pedigree-based expectations, but how many markers are required to achieve this in practice remains poorly understood. We use extensive pedigree and life-history data from an island population of song sparrows...

Data from: Estimating demographic contributions to effective population size in an age-structured wild population experiencing environmental and demographic stochasticity

Amanda E. Trask, Eric M. Bignal, Davy I. McCracken, Stuart B. Piertney & Jane M. Reid
1.A population's effective size (Ne) is a key parameter that shapes rates of inbreeding and loss of genetic diversity, thereby influencing evolutionary processes and population viability. However estimating Ne, and identifying key demographic mechanisms that underlie the Ne to census population size (N) ratio, remains challenging, especially for small populations with overlapping generations and substantial environmental and demographic stochasticity and hence dynamic age-structure. 2.A sophisticated demographic method of estimating Ne/N, which uses Fisher's reproductive value...

Data from: Offspring telomere length in the long lived Alpine swift is negatively related to the age of their biological father and foster mother

François Criscuolo, Sandrine Zahn & Pierre Bize
A growing body of studies is showing that offspring telomere length (TL) can be influenced by the age of their parents. Such a relationship might be explained by variation in TL at conception (gamete effect) and/or by alteration of early growth conditions in species providing parental care. In a long-lived bird with bi-parental care, the Alpine swift (Apus melba), we exchanged an uneven number of 2 to 4-day-old nestlings between pairs as part of a...

Data from: No evidence of inbreeding depression in sperm performance traits in wild song sparrows

Sylvain Losdat, Ryan R. Germain, Pirmin Nietlisbach, Peter Arcese & Jane M. Reid
Inbreeding is widely hypothesized to shape mating systems and population persistence, but such effects will depend on which traits show inbreeding depression. Population and evolutionary consequences could be substantial if inbreeding decreases sperm performance and hence decreases male fertilisation success and female fertility. However, the magnitude of inbreeding depression in sperm performance traits has rarely been estimated in wild populations experiencing natural variation in inbreeding. Further, the hypothesis that inbreeding could increase within-ejaculate variation in...

Data from: Body macronutrient composition is predicted by lipid and not protein content of the diet

Joshua P. Moatt, Catherine Hambly, Elizabeth Heap, Anna Kramer, Fiona Moon, John R. Speakman & Craig A. Walling
1. Diet is an important determinant of fitness related traits including growth, reproduction and survival. Recent work suggests that variation in protein : lipid ratio, particularly the amount of protein, in the diet is a key nutritional parameter. However, the traits that mediate the link between dietary macronutrient ratio and fitness related traits are less well understood. An obvious candidate is body composition, given its well-known link to health. 2. Here we investigate the relationship...

Data from: Vocal foragers and silent crowds: context-dependent vocal variation in Northeast Atlantic long-finned pilot whales

Fleur Visser, Annebelle C. M. Kok, M. G. Oudejans, Lindesay A. S. Scott-Hayward, Stacy L. DeRuiter, Ana C. Alves, Ricardo N. Antunes, Saana Isojunno, Graham J. Pierce, Hans Slabbekoorn, Jef Huisman, Patrick J. O. Miller & Annebelle C.M. Kok
Vocalisations form a key component of the social interactions and foraging behaviour of toothed whales. We investigated changes in calling and echolocation behaviour of long-finned pilot whales between foraging and non-foraging periods, by combining acoustic recordings and diving depth data from tagged individuals with concurrent surface observations on social behaviour of their group. The pilot whales showed marked vocal variation, specific to foraging and social context. During periods of foraging, pilot whales showed more vocal...

Soil and gas measurements from Puna grasslands under different land management over one year

V. Oliver
The dataset contains concentrations of total soil organic carbon, soil carbon fractions, soil CO2 fluxes, soil temperature and moisture in the Peruvian Andes. Measurements and sampling took place between 2010 and 2013. Data were generated as part of a larger NERC project: 'Are tropical uplands regional hotspots for methane and nitrous oxide'

Data from: Taxon abundance, diversity, co-occurrence and network analysis of the ruminal microbiota in response to dietary changes in dairy cows

Ilma Tapio, Daniel Fischer, Lucia Blasco, Miika Tapio, R. John Wallace, Ali R. Bayat, Laura Ventto, Minna Kahala, Enyew Negussie, Kevin J. Shingfield & Johanna Vilkki
The effects of sunflower oil (SO) (0 or 50 g/kg diet dry matter), supplemented to diets contrasting in the proportion of forage and concentrate (FC) (65:35 vs 35:65), were evaluated for their influence on rumen microbiome. Four multiparous Nordic Red dairy cows fitted with rumen cannulae were used in a 4 × 4 Latin square with a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of treatments and four 35-d periods. Ruminal digesta samples were collected on d...

Data from: Reconstructing Asian faunal introductions to eastern Africa from multi-proxy biomolecular and archaeological datasets

Mary E. Prendergast, Michael Buckley, Alison Crowther, Heidi Eager, Laurent Frantz, Ophélie Lebrasseur, Rainer Hutterer, Ardern Hulme-Beaman, Wim Van Neer, Katerina Douka, Margaret-Ashley Veall, Eréndira M. Quintana Morales, Verena J. Schuenemann, Ella Reiter, Richard Allen, Evangelos A. Dimopoulos, Richard M. Helm, Ceri Shipton, Ogeto Mwebi, Christiane Denys, Mark C. Horton, Stephanie Wynne-Jones, Jeffrey Fleisher, Chantal Radimilahy, Henry Wright … & Mark Horton
Human-mediated biological exchange has had global social and ecological impacts. In sub-Saharan Africa, several domestic and commensal animals were introduced from Asia in the pre-modern period; however, the timing and nature of these introductions remain contentious. One model supports introduction to the eastern African coast after the mid-first millennium CE, while another posits introduction dating back to 3000 BCE. These distinct scenarios have implications for understanding the emergence of long-distance maritime connectivity, and the ecological...

Data from: A test for paedomorphism in domestic pig cranial morphology

Allowen Evin, Joseph Owen, Greger Larson, Mélanie Debiais-Thibaud, Thomas Cucchi, Una Strand Vidarsdottir & Keith Dobney
Domestic animals are often described as paedomorphic, meaning that they retain juvenile characteristics into adulthood. Through a three-dimensional landmark-based geometric morphometric analysis of cranial morphology at three growth stages, we demonstrate that wild boar (n = 138) and domestic pigs (n = 106) (Sus scrofa) follow distinct ontogenetic trajectories. With the exception of the size ratio between facial and neurocranial regions, paedomorphism does not appear to be the primary pattern describing the observed differences between...

Data from: Understorey plant community composition reflects invasion history decades after invasive Rhododendron has been removed

Janet E. Maclean, Ruth J. Mitchell, David F.R.P. Burslem, David Genney, Jeanette Hall, Robin J. Pakeman & David F. R. P. Burslem
1) A growing awareness of the destructive effects of non-native invasive species has led to a massive increase in removal programmes around the world. Little is typically known about what happens to sites following the removal of the invasives, however, and the implicit assumption that the native community will return, unaided, to pre-invasion conditions is often left untested. 2) We assessed recovery of the native understorey plant community following removal of the non-native invasive Rhododendron...

Data from: Biomarker of burden: feather corticosterone reflects energetic expenditure and allostatic overload in captive waterfowl

David W. Johns, Tracy A. Marchant, Graham D. Fairhurst, John R. Speakman & Robert G. Clark
1.Allostatic load describes the interplay between energetic demand and availability and is highly context dependent, varying between seasons and life history stages. When energy demands exceed physiological set points modulated by glucocorticoid hormones, individuals may experience allostatic overload and transition between stages in sub-optimal physiological states. 2.Corticosterone, the major glucocorticoid hormone regulating energy expenditure in birds, is incorporated into growing feathers (CORTf), and it has been suggested that CORTf reflects long-term records of allostatic load...

Data from: Strong social relationships are associated with decreased longevity in a facultatively social mammal

Daniel T. Blumstein, Dana M. Williams, Alexandra N. Lim, Svenja Kroeger, Julien G.A. Martin & Julien G. A. Martin
Humans in strong social relationships are more likely to live longer because social relationships may buffer stressors and thus have protective effects. However, a shortcoming of human studies is that they often rely on self-reporting of these relationships. By contrast, observational studies of nonhuman animals permit detailed analyses of the specific nature of social relationships. Thus, discoveries that some social animals live longer and healthier lives if they are involved in social grooming, forage together,...

Data from: Evolution of pre-copulatory and post-copulatory strategies of inbreeding avoidance and associated polyandry

A. Bradley Duthie, Greta Bocedi, Ryan R. Germain & Jane M. Reid
Inbreeding depression is widely hypothesised to drive adaptive evolution of pre-copulatory and post-copulatory mechanisms of inbreeding avoidance, which in turn are hypothesised to affect evolution of polyandry (i.e., female multiple mating). However, surprisingly little theory or modelling critically examines selection for pre-copulatory or post-copulatory inbreeding avoidance, or both strategies, given evolutionary constraints and direct costs, or examines how evolution of inbreeding avoidance strategies might feed back to affect evolution of polyandry. Selection for post-copulatory inbreeding...

Data from: Breeding bird species diversity across gradients of land use from forest to agriculture in Europe

Matti J. Koivula, Dan E. Chamberlain, Robert J. Fuller, Stephen C. F. Palmer, Attila Bankovics, Fintan Bracken, Tom Bolger, Eduardo De Juana, Marc Montadert, Renato Neves, Rui Rufino, Angel Sallent, Luís Lopes Da Silva, Pedro J. Leitão, Manfred Steffen & Allan D. Watt
Loss, fragmentation and decreasing quality of habitats have been proposed as major threats to biodiversity world-wide, but relatively little is known about biodiversity responses to multiple pressures, particularly at very large spatial scales. We evaluated the relative contributions of four landscape variables (habitat cover, diversity, fragmentation and productivity) in determining different components of avian diversity across Europe. We sampled breeding birds in multiple 1-km2 landscapes, from high forest cover to intensive agricultural land, in eight...

Data from: Reproductive performance of resident and migrant males, females and pairs in a partially migratory bird

Hannah Grist, Francis Daunt, Sarah Wanless, Sarah J. Burthe, Mark A. Newell, Mike P. Harris & Jane M. Reid
1. Quantifying among-individual variation in life-history strategies, and associated variation in reproductive performance and resulting demographic structure, is key to understanding and predicting population dynamics and life-history evolution. Partial migration, where populations comprise a mixture of resident and seasonally-migrant individuals, constitutes a dimension of life-history variation that could be associated with substantial variation in reproductive performance. However, such variation has rarely been quantified due to the challenge of measuring reproduction and migration across a sufficient...

Data from: TAPBPR bridges UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase 1 onto MHC class I to provide quality control in the antigen presentation pathway

Andreas Neerincx, Clemens Hermann, Robin Antrobus, Andy Van Hateren, Cao Huan, Nico Trautwein, Stefan Stevanović, Tim Elliott, Janet E. Deane, Louise H. Boyle & Huan Cao
Recently we revealed that TAPBPR is a peptide exchange catalyst important for optimal peptide selection by MHC class I molecules. Here we asked if any other co-factors associate with TAPBPR which would explain its effect on peptide selection. We identify an interaction between TAPBPR and UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucosyltransferase 1 (UGT1), a folding sensor in the calnexin/calreticulin quality control cycle known to regenerate the Glc1Man9GlcNAc2 moiety on glycoproteins. Our results suggest the formation of a multimeric complex,...

Data from: Higher predation risk for insect prey at low latitudes and elevations

Tomas Roslin, Bess Hardwick, Vojtech Novotny, William K. Petry, Nigel R. Andrew, Ashley Asmus, Isabel C. Barrio, Yves Basset, Andrea Larissa Boesing, Timothy C. Bonebrake, Erin K. Cameron, Wesley Dáttilo, David A. Donoso, Pavel Drozd, Claudia L. Gray, David S. Hik, Sarah J. Hill, Tapani Hopkins, Shuyin Huang, Bonny Koane, Benita Laird-Hopkins, Liisa Laukkanen, Owen T. Lewis, Sol Milne, Isaiah Mwesige … & Eleanor M. Slade
Biotic interactions underlie ecosystem structure and function, but predicting interaction outcomes is difficult. We tested the hypothesis that biotic interaction strength increases toward the equator, using a global experiment with model caterpillars to measure predation risk. Across an 11,660-kilometer latitudinal gradient spanning six continents, we found increasing predation toward the equator, with a parallel pattern of increasing predation toward lower elevations. Patterns across both latitude and elevation were driven by arthropod predators, with no systematic...

Data from: Range shifting species reduce phylogenetic diversity in high latitude communities via competition

Robert Fitt, Lesley T. Lancaster & Robert N. L. Fitt
Under anthropogenic climate change, many species are expanding their ranges to higher latitudes and altitudes, resulting in novel species interactions. The consequences of these range shifts for native species, patterns of local biodiversity, and community structure in high latitude ecosystems are largely unknown but critical to understand in light of widespread poleward expansions by many warm-adapted generalists. Using niche modelling, phylogenetic methods, and field and laboratory studies, we investigated how colonisation of Scotland by a...

Data from: The changing environment of conservation conflict: geese and farming in Scotland

Tom H. E. Mason, Aidan Keane, Stephen M. Redpath & Nils Bunnefeld
1.Conflict between conservation objectives and human livelihoods is ubiquitous and can be highly damaging, but the processes generating it are poorly understood. Ecological elements are central to conservation conflict, and changes in their dynamics – for instance due to anthropogenic environmental change – are likely to influence the emergence of serious human-wildlife impacts and, consequently, social conflict. 2.We used mixed-effects models to examine the drivers of historic spatio-temporal dynamics in numbers of Greenland barnacle geese...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    31

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    31

Affiliations

  • University of Aberdeen
    31
  • University of St Andrews
    3
  • Centre for Ecology and Hydrology
    2
  • University of Edinburgh
    2
  • Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology
    2
  • University of Zurich
    2
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    2
  • University of Tübingen
    2
  • University of Oxford
    2
  • National Museum
    1