349 Works

Data from: When should we expect early bursts of trait evolution in comparative data? Predictions from an evolutionary food web model

Travis Ingram, Luke J. Harmon & Jonathan B. Shurin
Conceptual models of adaptive radiation predict that competitive interactions among species will result in an early burst of speciation and trait evolution followed by a slowdown in diversification rates. Empirical studies often show early accumulation of lineages in phylogenetic trees, but usually fail to detect early bursts of phenotypic evolution. We use an evolutionary simulation model to assemble food webs through adaptive radiation, and examine patterns in the resulting phylogenetic trees and species' traits (body...

Data from: The curious case of Hermodice carunculata (Annelida: Amphinomidae): evidence for genetic homogeneity throughout the Atlantic Ocean and adjacent basins

Joseph B. Ahrens, Elizabeth Borda, Rômulo Barroso, Paulo C. Paiva, Alexandra M. Campbell, Alexander Wolf, Maggy M. Nugues, Greg W. Rouse & Anja Schulze
Over the last few decades, advances in molecular techniques have led to the detection of strong geographic population structure and cryptic speciation in many benthic marine taxa, even those with long-lived pelagic larval stages. Polychaete annelids, in particular, generally show a high degree of population divergence, especially in mitochondrial genes. Rarely have molecular studies confirmed the presence of ‘cosmopolitan’ species. The amphinomid polychaete Hermodice carunculata was long considered the sole species within its genus, with...

Data from: High-throughput molecular identification of fish eggs using multiplex suspension bead arrays

Lani U Gleason & Ronald S Burton
The location and abundance of fish eggs provide information concerning the timing and location of spawning activities and can provide fishery-independent estimates of spawning biomass. However, the full value of egg and larval surveys is severely restricted because many species’ eggs and larvae are morphologically similar, making species-level identification difficult. Recent efforts have shown that nearly all species of fish may be identified by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences (e.g., via “DNA barcoding”). By taking advantage...

Data from: Expanding the described metabolome of the marine cyanobacterium Moorea producens JHB through orthogonal natural products workflows

Paul D. Boudreau, Emily A. Monroe, Suneet Mehrotra, Shane Desfor, Anton Korobeynikov, David H. Sherman, Thomas F. Murray, Lena Gerwick, Pieter C. Dorrestein & William H. Gerwick
Moorea producens JHB, a Jamaican strain of tropical filamentous marine cyanobacteria, has been extensively studied by traditional natural products techniques. These previous bioassay and structure guided isolations led to the discovery of two exciting classes of natural products, hectochlorin (1) and jamaicamides A (2) and B (3). In the current study, mass spectrometry-based ‘molecular networking’ was used to visualize the metabolome of Moorea producens JHB, and both guided and enhanced the isolation workflow, revealing additional...

Data from: Olfaction contributes to pelagic navigation in a coastal shark

Andrew P. Nosal, Yi Chao, John D. Farrara, Fei Chai & Philip A. Hastings
How animals navigate the constantly moving and visually uniform pelagic realm, often along straight paths between distant sites, is an enduring mystery. The mechanisms enabling pelagic navigation in cartilaginous fishes are particularly understudied. We used shoreward navigation by leopard sharks (Triakis semifasciata) as a model system to test whether olfaction contributes to pelagic navigation. Leopard sharks were captured alongshore, transported 9 km offshore, released, and acoustically tracked for approximately 4 h each until the transmitter...

Data from: Host coevolution alters the adaptive landscape of a virus

Alita R. Burmeister, Richard E. Lenski & Justin R. Meyer
The origin of new and complex structures and functions is fundamental for shaping the diversity of life. Such key innovations are rare because they require multiple interacting changes. We sought to understand how the adaptive landscape led to an innovation whereby bacteriophage λ evolved the new ability to exploit a receptor, OmpF, on Escherichia coli cells. Previous work showed that this ability evolved repeatedly, despite requiring four mutations in one virus gene. Here, we examine...

Data from: Ecological speciation of bacteriophage lambda in allopatry and sympatry

Justin R. Meyer, Devin T. Dobias, Sarah J. Medina, Lisa Servilio, Animesh Gupta & Richard E. Lenski
Understanding the conditions that allow speciation to occur is difficult because most research has focused on either long-lived organisms or asexual microorganisms. We propagated bacteriophage λ, a virus with rapid generations and frequent recombination, on two Escherichia coli host genotypes that expressed either the LamB or OmpF receptor. When supplied with either single host (allopatry), λ improved its binding to the available receptor while losing its ability to use the alternative. When evolving on both...

Data from: Probiotic treatment restores protection against lethal fungal infection lost during amphibian captivity

Jordan G. Kueneman, Douglas C. Woodhams, Reid Harris, Holly M. Archer, Rob Knight & Valerie J. McKenzie
Host-associated microbiomes perform many beneficial functions including resisting pathogens and training the immune system. Here, we show that amphibians developing in captivity lose substantial skin bacterial diversity, primarily due to reduced ongoing input from environmental sources. We combined studies of wild and captive amphibians with a database of over 1 000 strains that allows us to examine antifungal function of the skin microbiome. We tracked skin bacterial communities of 62 endangered boreal toads, Anaxyrus boreas,...

Data from: Poison and alarm: the Asian hornet Vespa velutina uses sting venom volatiles as alarm pheromone

Ya-Nan Cheng, Ping Wen, Shi-Hao Dong, Ken Tan & James C. Nieh
In colonial organisms, alarm pheromones can provide a key fitness advantage by enhancing colony defense and warning of danger. Learning which species use alarm pheromone and the key compounds involved therefore enhances our understanding of how this important signal has evolved. However, our knowledge of alarm pheromones is more limited in the social wasps and hornets as compared to the social bees and ants. Vespa velutina is an economically important and widespread hornet predator that...

Data from: Age, gender, neck circumference, and Epworth sleepiness scale do not predict obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): the challenge to predict OSA in advanced COPD

Xavier Soler, S.Y. Liao, J.M. Marin, G. Lorenzi-Filho, R. Jen, P. DeYoung, R.L. Owens, A.L. Ries & A. Malhotra
The combination of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. We hypothesized that predictors of OSA among patients with COPD may be distinct from OSA in the general population. Therefore, we investigated associations between traditional OSA risk factors (e.g. age), and sleep questionnaires [e.g. Epworth Sleepiness Scale] in 44 patients with advanced COPD. As a second aim we proposed a pilot, simplified screening test for...

Data from: Geographic signatures in species turnover: decoupling colonization and extinction across a latitudinal gradient

Natalie T. Jones & Benjamin Gilbert
High latitude communities have low species richness and are rapidly warming with climate change. Thus, temporal changes in community composition are expected to be greatest at high latitudes. However, at the same time traits such as body size can also change with latitude, potentially offsetting or increasing changes to community composition over time. We tested how zooplankton communities (copepods and cladocerans) have changed over a 25-75 year time span by assessing colonization and extinction rates...

Data from: Neonicotinoid pesticides and nutritional stress synergistically reduce survival in honey bees

Simone Tosi, James C. Nieh, Fabio Sgolastra, Riccardo Cabbri & Piotr Medrzycki
The honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) is a major pollinator whose health is of global concern. Declines in honey bee health are related to multiple factors, including resource quality and pesticide contamination. Intensive agricultural areas with crop monocultures potentially reduce the quality and quantity of available nutrients and expose bee foragers to pesticides. However, there is, to date, no evidence for synergistic effects between pesticides and nutritional stress in animals. The neonicotinoids clothianidin (CLO) and...

Data from: A 3,000 year record of Caribbean reef urchin communities reveals causes and consequences of long-term decline in Diadema antillarum

Katie L. Cramer, Aaron O'Dea, Carolina Carpenter & Richard D. Norris
Urchins are the last abundant grazers of macroalgae on most Caribbean reefs following the historical overexploitation of herbivorous fishes. The long-spined urchin Diadema antillarum was particularly effective at controlling macroalgae and facilitating coral dominance on Caribbean reefs until its ecological extinction from a catastrophic disease epidemic in the early 1980s. Despite their important role in the structure and functioning of Caribbean reef ecosystems, the natural dynamics of Caribbean reef urchin communities are poorly known due...

Data from: Mutation in the intracellular chloride channel CLCC1 associated with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa

Lin Li, Xiaodong Jiao, Ilaria D’Atri, Fumihito Ono, Ralph Nelson, Chi-Chao Chan, Naoki Nakaya, Zhiwei Ma, Yan Ma, Xiaoying Cai, Longhua Zhang, Siying Lin, Abdul Hameed, Barry A. Chioza, Holly Hardy, Gavin Arno, Sarah Hull, Muhammad Imran Khan, James Fasham, V. Gaurav Harlalka, Michel Michaelides, Anthony T. Moore, Zeynep Hande Coban Akdemir, Shalini Jhangiani, James R. Lupski … & Frans P. M. Cremers
We identified a homozygous missense alteration (c.75C>A, p.D25E) in CLCC1, encoding a presumptive intracellular chloride channel highly expressed in the retina, associated with autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (arRP) in eight consanguineous families of Pakistani descent. The p.D25E alteration decreased CLCC1 channel function accompanied by accumulation of mutant protein in granules within the ER lumen, while siRNA knockdown of CLCC1 mRNA induced apoptosis in cultured ARPE-19 cells. TALEN KO in zebrafish was lethal 11 days post...

Data from: Acquisition of obligate mutualist symbionts during the larval stage is not beneficial for a coral host

Aaron Hartmann, Kristen Marhaver, Anke Klueter, Michael Lovci, Collin Closek, Erika Diaz Almeyda, Valerie Chamberland, Frederick Archer, Dimitri Deheyn, Mark Vermeij & Monica Medina
Theory suggests that the direct transmission of endosymbionts from parents to offspring (vertical transmission) in animal hosts is advantageous and evolutionarily stable, yet many host species instead acquire their symbionts from the environment (horizontal acquisition). An outstanding question in marine biology is why some scleractinian corals do not provision their eggs and larvae with the endosymbiotic dinoflagellates that are necessary for a juvenile’s ultimate survival. We tested whether the acquisition of photosynthetic endosymbionts (family Symbiodiniaceae)...

Revenue design thinking: constructing an accelerated cash /phased write down story

Christopher Felker
A well-designed data story is a launch point for revenue cycle professionals using analytics to manage accounts receivable according to portfolio principles. In the last 100 (one hundred) days before the close of a fiscal year, holding accounts receivables too long poses an inordinate risk on the perceived value of UCSD Health's trial balance inventory. In April 2018, we started to design a Tableau dashboard that would more accurately forecast two things First Future free...

Contract design thinking: a service oriented architecture SOA for contract models, maintenance and testing

Christopher Felker & Sue Ahl
Contract variances complicate academic medical center accounts receivables because they are one driver of ambiguity when calculating future free cash flows FFCF [1]. UC Health provides leadership and strategic direction for UC’s five academic medical centers and 18 health professional schools. Contract variations within 1 (one) medical center has a multiplier effect in the consolidated annual financial reporting. In December 2017 we created an internal project charter [2] to consolidate contracts financial accounts receivables activity...

Data from: Spatial heterogeneity in species composition constrains plant community responses to herbivory and fertilization

Dorothee Hodapp, Elizabeth T. Borer, W. Stanley Harpole, Eric M. Lind, Eric W. Seabloom, Peter B. Adler, Juan Alberti, Carlos A. Arnillas, Jonathan D. Bakker, Lori Biederman, Marc Cadotte, Elsa E. Cleland, Scott Collins, Philip A. Fay, Jennifer Firn, Nicole Hagenah, Yann Hautier, Oscar Iribarne, Johannes M.H. Knops, Rebecca L. McCulley, Andrew MacDougall, Joslin L. Moore, John W. Morgan, Brent Mortensen, Kimberly J. La Pierre … & Johannes M. H. Knops
Environmental change can result in substantial shifts in community composition. The associated immigration and extinction events are likely constrained by the spatial distribution of species. Still, studies on environmental change typically quantify biotic responses at single spatial (time series within a single plot) or temporal (spatial beta-diversity at single time points) scales, ignoring their potential interdependence. Here, we use data from a global network of grassland experiments to determine how turnover responses to two major...

Data from: Simultaneous radiation of bird and mammal lice following the K-Pg boundary

Kevin P. Johnson, Nam-Phuong Nguyen, Andrew D. Sweet, Bret M. Boyd, Tandy Warnow & Julie M. Allen
The diversification of parasite groups often occurs at the same time as the diversification of their hosts. However, most studies demonstrating this concordance only examine single host-parasite groups. Multiple diverse lineages of ectoparasitic lice occur across both birds and mammals. Here we describe the evolutionary history of lice based on analyses of 1,107 single copy orthologous genes from sequenced genomes of 46 species of lice. We identify three major diverse groups of lice: one exclusively...

Data from: Underlying mechanisms and ecological context of variation in exploratory behavior of the Argentine ant, Linepithema humile

Hannah Page, Andrew Sweeney, Anna Pilko & Noa Pinter-Wollman
Uncovering how and why animals explore their environment is fundamental for understanding population dynamics, the spread of invasive species, species interactions, etc. In social animals, individuals within a group can vary in their exploratory behavior, and the behavioral composition of the group can determine its collective success. Workers of the invasive Argentine ant (Linepithema humile) exhibit individual variation in exploratory behavior, which affects the colony’s collective nest selection behavior. Here, we examine the mechanisms underlying...

Data from: Evolution of the exclusively human-pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae: human-specific engagement of immunoregulatory Siglecs

Corinna S. Landig, Ashley Hazel, Benjamin P. Kellman, Jerry J. Fong, Flavio Schwarz, Sarika Agarwal, Nissi Varki, Paola Massari, Nathan E. Lewis, Sanjay Ram & Ajit Varki
Neisseria gonorrhoeae causes the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhea exclusively in humans and uses multiple strategies to infect, including acquisition of host sialic acids that cap and mask lipooligosaccharide termini, while restricting complement activation. We hypothesized that gonococci selectively target human anti-inflammatory sialic acid-recognizing Siglec receptors on innate immune cells to blunt host responses, and that pro-inflammatory Siglecs and SIGLEC pseudogene polymorphisms represent host evolutionary adaptions to counteract this interaction. N. gonorrhoeae can indeed engage multiple...

Data from: Cognitive function and mood at high altitude following acclimatization and use of supplemental oxygen and adaptive servoventilation sleep treatments

Erica C. Heinrich, Matea A. Djokic, Dillon Gilbertson, Pamela N. DeYoung, Naa-Oye Bosompra, Lu Wu, Cecilia Y. Anza-Ramirez, Jeremy E. Orr, Frank L. Powell, Atul Malhotra & Tatum S. Simonson
Impairments in cognitive function, mood, and sleep quality occur following ascent to high altitude. Low oxygen (hypoxia) and poor sleep quality are both linked to impaired cognitive performance but their independent contributions at high altitude remain unknown. Adaptive servoventilation (ASV) improves sleep quality by stabilizing breathing and preventing central apneas without supplemental oxygen. We compared the efficacy of ASV and supplemental oxygen sleep treatments for improving daytime cognitive function and mood in high-altitude visitors (N...

Experiencing Cancer in Appalachian Kentucky

Melanie McComsey, David Ahern, Robin C. Vanderpool, Timothy W. Mullett, Ming-Yuan Chih, Meghan Johnson, Michele Ellison, Karen Onyeije, Bradford W. Hesse & Eliah Aronoff-Spencer
Nothing tells the story of people working together better than a community quilt. A diversity of talents, colors, and materials brought together through skill and shared purpose. Perhaps never before have we as Americans needed a stronger reminder that many hands make short work of big problems. The work presented here by the L.A.U.N.C.H. Collaborative offers a new framework for health care that could be compared to a digital quilt, powered by community-based participatory design,...

Bacterial exposure mediates developmental plasticity and resistance to lethal Vibrio lentus Infection in purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) larvae

Nicholas Schuh, Tyler Carrier, Catherine Schrankel, Adam Reitzel, Andreas Heyland & Jonathan Rast
Exposure to and colonization by bacteria during development have wide-ranging beneficial effects on animal biology but can also inhibit growth or cause disease. The immune system is the prime mediator of these microbial interactions and is itself shaped by them. Studies using diverse animal taxa have begun to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the acquisition and transmission of bacterial symbionts and their interactions with developing immune systems. Moreover, the contexts of these associations are often confounded...

Bacteriophage lambda overcomes a perturbation in its host‐viral genetic network through mutualism and evolution of life history traits

Animesh Gupta, Anechelle N. Soto, Sarah J. Medina, Katherine L. Petrie & Justin R. Meyer
An important driver of viral evolution is natural selection to optimize the use of their hosts’ genetic network. To learn how viruses respond to this pressure, we disrupted the genetic network of Escherichia coli to inhibit replication of its virus, bacteriophage lambda, and then observed how λ evolved to compensate. We deleted E. coli's dnaJ gene, which lambda uses to initiate DNA replication. Lambda partially restored its ability to reproduce with just two adaptive mutations...

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